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What to do about DNP and flu shot?

Nurses   (20,565 Views | 262 Replies)

Travelingon has 17 years experience as a BSN.

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BostonFNP has 9 years experience as a APRN and specializes in Adult Internal Medicine.

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2 hours ago, tacticool said:

This post by the OP is ludicrious. Not mentioning the fact that they're not going to be a practicing Nurse Practitioner left out the fact that not getting the flu shot was germane. 

FWIW the OP wants to be a nurse leader/educator not a APRN.

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dirtyhippiegirl has 8 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in PDN; Burn; Phone triage.

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My husband and I were hiking and climbing in Nepal last year. At one point, we were in villages that were a 2 to 3 day hike to the nearest village with a road and from there, a 6ish hour bus drive to the nearest facility approximating a hospital in Kathmandu (tourists are advised to go to India for medical treatment because Nepalese hospitals are so bad, btw) -- assuming the road didn't get washed out etc. It really put the privilege we have as Westerners in not-dirt poor countries to even be having this discussion into perspective for me.

I am also fit enough to carry 20 lbs of gear on my back for almost 3 weeks while hiking and climbing 8 to 12 miles a day at altitudes up to 18,000 ft. I have had the flu shot every year since I was a baby and have never been sick in my life to the point that I thought I might have influenza. Ta da.

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On 1/29/2020 at 8:54 PM, LovingLife123 said:

Career change.  It should not be possible to get a masters or doctorate in nursing and not believe in the flu shot.  

Slippery slope.

People can Think and Believe whatever they want.  God-given minds and innate freedom and all that.

What we have to do to keep a job can be another story.

For OP:  I think your choice is obvious.  And you will make more money as a DBA, won't you?  And avoid all the hassles nurses have to put up with.  Good luck with your decision.

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Guest957596 has 3 years experience and specializes in BSN, RN-BC, NREMT, EMT-P, TCRN.

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11 hours ago, BostonFNP said:

FWIW the OP wants to be a nurse leader/educator not a APRN.

Exactly, that's what I said. She didn't mention initially she didn't want to be a practicing NP. But even as an educator/leader, she has to educate people about the value and necessity of vaccinations.

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MemphisRN has 43 years experience as a ASN, BSN, MSN and specializes in Hospice.

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This is very confusing to me. If the OP wants to just be an educator/leader then get a PhD instead of the DNP. I plan to get my PhD in nursing research and education. I think I am to old to do the FNP. My end goal is to teach and do research at the university level as my retirement. But if I was going to do any type of patient care I would expect to get the flu shot. Not for my protection but for protection of the patients and families I come into contact with in the course of delivering care. I work in hospice and my patients already have a short life expectancy. I don't want to do anything that would make it even shorter. I have seen a lot of patients that were fine on Tuesday pass away on Thursday because they went septic from a bug and couldn't fight it off. Bottom line, no patient contact then skip the flu shot. Patient contact, get the flu shot. 😀

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Banana nut has 2 years experience as a BSN, RN, EMT-B.

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Why don't we check titers for flu immunity before we give the flu shot? What if im already immune to the flu that im getting the shot for?   Wouldn't that be an unnecessary risk for injury?  I personally have had a physical injury from the flu shot so i decline it every year. It's too invasive for me and just don't see how the benefit outweighs the risk in relation getting another physicalinjury from the needle stick.  I have not gotten or given the flu to anyone in 10 years of working direct patient care.  

Edited by Banana nut

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6 hours ago, Kooky Korky said:

What we have to do to keep a job can be another story.

Korky has the right idea, right on point.

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KatieMI has 6 years experience as a BSN, MSN, RN and specializes in ICU, LTACH, Internal Medicine.

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6 minutes ago, Banana nut said:

Why don't we check titers for flu immunity before we give the flu shot? What if im already immune to the flu that im getting the shot for?   Wouldn't have be unnecessary risk for injury?  I personally have had a physical injury from the flu shot so i haven't gotten one in years.  It's too invasive for me and just don't see how the benefit outweighs the risk in relation getting a intestinal injury from the needle stick.  I have not gotten or given the flu to anyone in 10 years of working direct patient care.  

Because the main antigens of influenza virus undergo quick mutations. You might have high titer of antibodies for, say, neuraminidase A variant 2019 but it is 2020 now and the most common circulating variety of virus got different neuraminidase A. It is now variant 2020 against which you do not have immunity. 

Second thing, the three main antigens of influenza virus are small proteins with low molecular mass and therefore small "responce region" (this is the area of viral protein molecule which starts immune responce). As a common rule, the bigger the region, the stronger goes  immune responce and the longer it lasts (that's why people can be severely allergic to bee venom, peanuts and other stuff all their lives after only a few contacts in childhood). 

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subee has 48 years experience as a MSN, CRNA and specializes in CRNA, Finally retired.

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On 2/8/2020 at 9:06 AM, Banana nut said:

Why don't we check titers for flu immunity before we give the flu shot? What if im already immune to the flu that im getting the shot for?   Wouldn't that be an unnecessary risk for injury?  I personally have had a physical injury from the flu shot so i decline it every year. It's too invasive for me and just don't see how the benefit outweighs the risk in relation getting another physicalinjury from the needle stick.  I have not gotten or given the flu to anyone in 10 years of working direct patient care.  

I'm a little surprised a nurse doesn't understand how short lived the flu shot is.  Otherwise, we'd only have to get one very occasionally.  Maybe you don't work with sick people?  Just because gave me a bad dye job 20 years ago, doesn't mean I would swear off highlights the rest of my life if I follow your logic.  And that's great that you have never had the flu.  I wish we could study what the qualities are that give you that edge.  

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Banana nut has 2 years experience as a BSN, RN, EMT-B.

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39 minutes ago, KatieMI said:

Because the main antigens of influenza virus undergo quick mutations. You might have high titer of antibodies for, say, neuraminidase A variant 2019 but it is 2020 now and the most common circulating variety of virus got different neuraminidase A. It is now variant 2020 against which you do not have immunity. 

Second thing, the three main antigens of influenza virus are small proteins with low molecular mass and therefore small "responce region" (this is the area of viral protein molecule which starts immune responce). As a common rule, the bigger the region, the stronger goes  immune responce and the longer it lasts (that's why people can be severely allergic to bee venom, peanuts and other stuff all their lives after only a few contacts in childhood). 

Thank  you  for your response; I understand that the virus antigens can change,  but the efficacy of the vaccine is ~20% as it is, so I feel if they aren't going to see if ive been previously exposed or if im already immune to what they are trying to inject me with it feels like bad science. Like throwing darts blindfolded with my personal health at risk and with very low odds of a reward if any at all.  

Edited by Banana nut

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subee has 48 years experience as a MSN, CRNA and specializes in CRNA, Finally retired.

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Are you insinuating that EVERY person should have titres done before getting a flu shot?  Denial, denial, denial.  You've got a fixed idea and nothing is going to change your mind.  Bad science.  

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Banana nut has 2 years experience as a BSN, RN, EMT-B.

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Just now, subee said:

Are you insinuating that EVERY person should have titres done before getting a flu shot?  Denial, denial, denial.  You've got a fixed idea and nothing is going to change your mind.  Bad science.  

I am concerned about my personal health and safely above everything else so I don't really care if we check anyone else's titers i do however feel im entitled to proper investigation and discover before a forced intervention is placed upon me.  

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