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Is someone justified in harassing someone to tell them if they got vaccinated or not?

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9 minutes ago, Conqueror+ said:

I'm claiming the side that doesn't see room for name calling amongst professionals.

You really believe the name-calling has only come from one side? Seriously?

Conqueror+, BSN, RN

Has 27 years experience.

2 hours ago, Wuzzie said:

You really believe the name-calling has only come from one side? Seriously?

No and that was part of my point. There is this blatant lie that people on one side are "rabid and aggressive" while another is speaking lovingly about the data with only respect.

Conqueror+, BSN, RN

Has 27 years experience.

2 hours ago, toomuchbaloney said:

So? The unvaccinated person should just keep their reasons "private" if they don't want to deal with the resultant discussion and challenges to reasoning.  That's safer for the entire country,  when those choosing unwisely don't share their distrust and suspicions during a pandemic. 

I think you are intentionally missing what I am saying. I mentioned the right to not discuss it either way. To put it more simply "none of your business" when asked. If someone is for or against it they are only asking to see if you give what they consider the "right" answer before drama ensues.

toomuchbaloney

Has 43 years experience.

33 minutes ago, Conqueror+ said:

I think you are intentionally missing what I am saying. I mentioned the right to not discuss it either way. To put it more simply "none of your business" when asked. If someone is for or against it they are only asking to see if you give what they consider the "right" answer before drama ensues.

It's a matter of public health and personal risk. 

Elvis is alive.

Covid is not real.

I am vaccinated against idiocracy.

Covid is real.

Everything on the Internet is true.

Trust all government officials, they have your interest at heart.

To thine own self, be true.

 

MunoRN, RN

Specializes in Critical Care. Has 10 years experience.

20 hours ago, Conqueror+ said:

Its interesting that unvaccinated folks are characterized as rabid, idiotic and aggressive. The pro-vaxxers are no better with their condescension and name calling. MAYBE some unvaccinated folks aren't comfortable talking because no one likes a pushy, judgmental know it all in their business or their face. I envision doing this to a patient who declines. Nurses would be appalled but have NO issue doing it to each other. 

I don't disagree that personal decisions aren't anyone else's business, personal decisions being those that don't affect others.

But saying that someone's decision to not get a Covid vaccine (and the misinformation that is often shared to justify that decision) is purely personal is like saying whether or not someone drives drunk is their own business, not anyone else's.

Vaccination offers a benefit to the person vaccinated, but more importantly it benefits society as a whole.  Vaccination is how we get ourselves out of a pandemic, and it's how we protect each other.  This is generally referred to as Public Health, and promoting public health, as well as criticizing those who threaten public health, are well within the professional expectations of a nurse.  

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I don't disagree that personal decisions aren't anyone else's business, personal decisions being those that don't affect others.

Everything one does affects others....this is a invalid argument. Every decision is personal and affects everyone else. It is an individual decision based on each circumstance given in each moment. I am free to make my own choices. I am not beholden to others, only myself. To claim otherwise, would be false to the notion of the essence of freedom itself.
 

I choose freedom:

"The last of the human freedoms: to choose one's attitude in any given set of circumstances, to choose one's own way." - Victor Frankl

 

@IamICU yes but when your choices affect others you have a moral obligation to at least consider and attempt to mitigate them. 

23 minutes ago, MunoRN said:

This is generally referred to as Public Health, and promoting public health, as well as criticizing those who threaten public health, are well within the professional expectations of a nurse.  

Agree.

I do think there is a distinction between criticizing (and critiquing) vs. name-calling.

This comment is referencing no one in particular as it is an example we've probably all heard in various circles, but take the term "covidiot." Fine, we might be thinking that, we might be disgusted with some of these people's behavior, we might vehemently disagree with them. So...if someone wants to characterize them as "covidiot," so be it. My personal belief is that at the end of the day that sure the heck doesn't help any public health effort; I would go as far as saying it makes it more difficult.  So then the name-caller would need to accept the discrepancy between their purported beliefs and their behavior.

MunoRN, RN

Specializes in Critical Care. Has 10 years experience.

7 minutes ago, IamICU said:

Everything one does affects others....this is a invalid argument. Every decision is personal and affects everyone else. It is an individual decision based on each circumstance given in each moment. I am free to make my own choices. I am not beholden to others, only myself. To claim otherwise, would be false to the notion of the essence of freedom itself.
 

I choose freedom:

"The last of the human freedoms: to choose one's attitude in any given set of circumstances, to choose one's own way." - Victor Frankl

 

Given the context that's kind of an absurd argument but I'll play along.

I'm currently choosing between two baseball games to watch, it's certainly not impossible that the decision I make will never have any effect on others.

What we're discussing is whether the degree to which a decision affects others should determine the degree to which others should be able to comment or criticize that decision.  I would disagree that which baseball game I choose to watch has the same effect on Public health as whether or not half the country remains unvaccinated.

nursel56

Specializes in Peds/outpatient FP,derm,allergy/private duty. Has 45 years experience.

On 7/19/2021 at 10:13 PM, DesiDani said:

should-you-share-your-vaccine-status.jpg.645ea6eec99292a41dfd6730c6d35dde.jpg

Say you got vaccinated and choose not to stand in the middle of the street to tell the world. Yet friend or coworker keeps nagging you to tell them if you did or not 

Harassing someone about anything, generally speaking is a bad idea, and in certain instances qualify for remediation in the courts.

If this occurs in a work situation, it is at best a morale killer, and if it occurs frequently, evidence of a toxic work culture.

The situation as presented doesn't have enough information. Harassment and nagging refer to repeated questioning or repeated requests to alter behavior.

I don't have any emotional or political baggage associated with the concept of vaccination requirements at the workplace, though. I wouldn't have a problem simply answering the question. If a friend is doing the nagging and harassing, I would want to seriously rethink whether or not they really are a friend.

I have no moral obligation to the masses.