Thermometer

  1. I have to purchase a new Thermometer for the clinic (the one here is a dinosaur that doesn't work when you want it to). I am currently using a cheapo digital that takes about 2-3 mins to get a reading.
    Looking for some feed back on what kind you use.

    I want to get something that is cost effective and reliable.

    I was looking at the no touch infrared, does anyone currently use one.
    I'm tore between the infrared and tympanic!
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  2. 11 Comments

  3. by   BeckyESRN
    I use an infrared. I love my VeraTemp, but they stopped making them. I just pick up a Preve on Amazon and it's great!
  4. by   caliotter3
    I use a tympanic thermometer, the Braun one, that came out several years ago. Or, whatever is provided where I work.
  5. by   scuba nurse
    Quote from BeckyESRN
    I use an infrared. I love my VeraTemp, but they stopped making them. I just pick up a Preve on Amazon and it's great!
    I use the Vera Temp as well and LOVE it. I didn't know they dont make it anymore!
  6. by   ruby_jane
    From a CE I did a minute ago: oral thermometry is the most accurate (actually, rectal is the most accurate but no, thanks). I have loved my Welch Allyn thermometer for seven years. During the Ebola Year they bought me a temporal thermometer, which reads up to two degrees off! Useful for the kids in our sheltered classroom and the kid who is chewing gum or just got done with a Starbucks, though.
  7. by   OldDude
    Quote from ruby_jane
    From a CE I did a minute ago: oral thermometry is the most accurate (actually, rectal is the most accurate but no, thanks). I have loved my Welch Allyn thermometer for seven years. During the Ebola Year they bought me a temporal thermometer, which reads up to two degrees off! Useful for the kids in our sheltered classroom and the kid who is chewing gum or just got done with a Starbucks, though.
    I've tried others of all kinds but I predominantly use the Welch Allyn SureTemp oral. I have a laser one for those with sensitive gag reflex but I find it usually reads cooler than reality. I think the oral is the most accurate - other than rectal of course but...

    I will not use a temporal thermometer.
  8. by   canoehead
    I used temporal artery thermometers at an ER I used to work in. They are laughable for accuracy, and as much as five degrees out from the rectal temp. It was more accurate to feel the child's forehead and guess. I wrote to the company for suggestions on improving accuracy, but nothing they sent me made a bit of difference. I am team tympanic, all the way.
  9. by   GmaPearl BSN RN
    Love my Welch Allyn SureTemp. 23 years and still going strong!
  10. by   aprilmoss
    Braun tympanics now which replaced our old Welsh-Allen electronic oral (and I guess rectal though I never had the probe covers for that, though I contemplated threatening some of my frequent flyers with that).
  11. by   MrNurse(x2)
    We had a highly rated IR that was highly inaccurate before I started here. Shudder to think of the febrile students that stayed, but truly, the teachers sent most home (no nurse). I use a Braun (consumer division of Welch-Allyn) tympanic. Faster than the orals I used in the past.
  12. by   ~♪♫ in my ♥~
    I own four digital thermometers...

    Filac 3000

    WelchAllyn SureTemp Plus (1 w/ an oral/axillary probe and one w/ a rectal probe)

    Exergen TAT-5000

    I have a few comments and observations:

    1) The Filac and the WelchAllyn are essentially identical as regards their primary function - a single temperature measurement. I chose one vs. the other based only on which probe covers were readily available at my place(s) of work.

    2) Temporal IR thermometry vs. oral thermocouple thermometry: When performed properly, the differences are within experimental accuracy. I have taken many dozens of measurements comparing my oral and temporal devices and I do not find a statistically significant difference... except that based on technique.

    3) Oral vs. axillary thermometry: Again, over many samples, I have not found any statistically significant difference... except that based on technique.

    4) Oral vs rectal thermometry: Over several samples, I again have not found any statistically significant difference... except that based on technique.

    Regarding technique:

    Just recently I was called to the bedside to assess a patient with an acute mental status change. There had earlier been a fever documented of 102.4. The bedside nurse told me that she'd just checked another temp (orally) and that it was 97.8. The lower number was inconsistent with the patient presentation (he felt very warm to the touch) and - presuming the accuracy of the earlier reading less than 60m prior - did not make sense physiologically. I made several attempts at an oral temperature but couldn't get the probe firmly nestled against the posterior frenulum due to patient's biting and moving. I finally went to an axillary measurement and found 102.7.

    Just a moment ago, I used my Filac and checked three oral temps on myself... 98.3, 97.9, and 96.3... The first two were on alternate sides of my posterior frenulum while the third was under my tongue more anteriorly - the way that many patients try to have their oral temps taken. I followed these up with an axillary temp of 98.1. I don't have my TAT readily available but have done numerous comparisons and always get good correlation when I use it exactly as recommended by Exergen.

    My observation is that all temps are all technique dependent. The only thing a rectal temp offers is the simplest technique of them all.
  13. by   MrsK_Nurse
    I think that oral is the only way to go. I have had trouble with my infared no touch thermometer here at school and I used to work MedSurg and our PACU would use a temporal thermometer, we used oral or rectal. In report we would get that their temp was 97.9 when they got to the floor and we checked with rectal it would be 92.7.

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