Jump to content

Terminated

Posted

Wow, this is very hard to take in. I was just fired for something that I didn't even know I did wrong. I used my nursing judgement in Friday when a patient did something and I wrote a note about it. I even checked with 2 other nurses (sitting at the desk with me) to make sure a general note was adequate not an "expanded note" and they said that's all they would do too.

In any case it's the "termination process" that's killing me here. I was advised by a supervisor over the weekend to check in with someone from administration to review my "file" on Monday. Monday morning I get a phone call from another supervisor about Fridays incident, I explained in full detail. On my way in on Monday I get another phone call about Fridays "incident," I explain in full detail, said that it's all in my note and asked if I had anything to worry about. We arranged to meet Wednesday. I told her I was on my way in then anyway, she said not necessary.

I went in to review my file. My DON saw me, glared and went into her office. I went to see an administraitor I had a good connection with and told her that I wanted to sit down with her and review my file in private. We ran around for 10 minutes until I was told that the DON was ready to see me. I said that I wasn't here to see her and we were meeting Wednesday. Didn't seem to matter.

I went in. DON at her desk. Supervisor who called me at a table taking notes. They told me that I was suspended and I wasnt supposed to be there. Nobody had told me I was suspended before this. We had only aggreed to meet on Wednesday. They asked me to explain Fridays events where I did nothing wrong. I explained. I was criticized. I defended. They yelled. I started sweating, shaking and told theme that I had only come in to see my file. I left the office.

I was pulled into HR. They showed me my file. HR went to see my DON. The administrator I "trusted" came in to see me. I tried talking to her about my write ups to understand them because I didn't and then she started asking me about my wedding, insisting we lighten the mood and talk about that instead.

HR returned and said I needed to go back to the DON's office. DON, Suservisor, HR and me. I was told that I broke policy. I asked what one and if I could see it, they said no. I asked HR to advocate for me, she said that she has to advocate for everyone in the room, including the DON and Supervisor. I was handed a paper that said I was terminated. I told them I did what I was trained to do, they need to re-educate the people who trained me. They said this isn't about them, this is about you. I got up and walked out. HR followed my yelling "I'm going to need your badge!" I tried to step into an office she said " you can't go in there!" Then "don't forget to bring back your badge!"

I don't know I'm mixed up. I was looking for other employment and I'm about 90% sure I have another job. But this termination process seems very weird. I have felt like my head had been on a chopping block for weeks and I think they were looking for anything to kick me out. Should I do anything about this? If so, what?

Edited by sdugan07

sallyrnrrt, ADN, RN

Specializes in critical care, ER,ICU, CVSURG, CCU.

Seems extremely, if I perceived an error, when I was DON, I tried turning it into a "teachable moment"

best wishes

roser13, ASN, RN

Specializes in Med/Surg, Ortho, ASC. Has 17 years experience.

It's hard to understand your situation due to lack of details. But you are correct to be vague on the internet. I'm just not sure that anyone can advise you without a better understanding of the situation.

By "do anything," do you mean challenge your termination? If so, your best bet would be to hire an attorney who would have access to all the details.

klone, MSN, RN

Specializes in OB-Gyn/Primary Care/Ambulatory Leadership. Has 15 years experience.

Sounds like they've been looking for a reason to let you go. If it wasn't this, it would be something else. I would see no value to myself to continue working there. So with that in mind, I wouldn't "do anything" unless you're hoping for compensatory damages. Wrongful termination lawsuits are very hard to win, though.

BSNbeDONE, ASN, BSN, LPN, RN

Specializes in Med/Surg, LTACH, LTC, Home Health. Has 35 years experience.

If you could at least tell us what the patient did, then we could provide examples of how we'd respond/proceed if in that particular situation.

Been there,done that, ASN, RN

Has 33 years experience.

Sounds like they've been looking for a reason to let you go. If it wasn't this, it would be something else. I would see no value to myself to continue working there. So with that in mind, I wouldn't "do anything" unless you're hoping for compensatory damages. Wrongful termination lawsuits are very hard to win, though.

Wrongful termination lawsuits, are a piece of cake with the right lawyer.

Been there,done that, ASN, RN

Has 33 years experience.

What exactly were you terminated for? If you were called in to review your "file".. it looks like you have been in the disciplinary process.. and this incident was the final straw.

I wasn't called in to review my file. I went in to see it for myself so I could understand it. I had a meeting arranged for Wednesday and they decided to meet with me yesterday because I was there. I don't want to give details on what happened Friday, but I can honestly say that I don't believe I did anything wrong, and if it happened again I would do the same thing.

I'm not sure what you are wanting here. We have no idea what really happened, what you actually did, what they objected to about your actions, etc. I guess all we can do is give you moral support. Yes, you could get a lawyer to fight it if you have the $$ to do so.

Good luck.

NotYourMamasRN

Specializes in Float Pool - A Little Bit of Everything. Has 6 years experience.

I don't really understand what happened. But I definitely can say that I saw a lot of shady employment practices in LTC/SNF.

KatieMI, BSN, MSN, RN

Specializes in ICU, LTACH, Internal Medicine. Has 8 years experience.

While I do not understand what exactly happened, there are couple of things for future reference:

1) never, EVER trust anybody from administration. Period. These guys are not your friends.

2). Never, EVER trust HR. Same as above.

3). Never, ever, sign anything you do not understand. If they cannot let you know what schmolicy you broke, POLITELY and INDIRECTLY let them know that the further talks will resume just as soon as the schmolicy in question will be given to you in written form, WITH the date on it (so you know it was not just pulled from the thin air for the case). "I am so sorry but I just do not understand what is the problem with (...)", repeat as needed.

4). Never, EVER buy out talks about weddings, churches, kids, dogs, etc. You were called to see the file, so that's what you are going to do. POLITELY redirect the talk.

5). Secure relationship with workplace violation lawyer before you accept any job. It can be the same guy who runs your estate/family/other neutral business just sitting there, for the beginning. Usually it is enough to bring everybody else in the room back to the Earth.

6). Never argue and never defend anything. Never tell that other nurses did the same thing or worse -everybody speeds, but only someone gets pulled off. That's life, it is not fair, but it is an absolute unprofessional thing to push your mistakes to someone else. Speak ONLY about yourself.

7). There is no such thing as "excessive nursing note". If it has to be the size of "War and Peace", so be it.

8). ONE discipline on file should be a reason to look for other place, two such things are absolute indication to change jobs STAT, till you still can do it on your own.

Edited by KatieMI

CelticGoddess, BSN, RN

Specializes in Palliative, Onc, Med-Surg, Home Hospice. Has 6 years experience.

Wrongful termination lawsuits, are a piece of cake with the right lawyer.

Not in a right to work state.

Been there,done that, ASN, RN

Has 33 years experience.

Not in a right to work state.

I am not saying I know law. I do know that a coworker was terminated, the paper trail leading to her dismissal was immaculate. Her brother was a lawyer, got her reinstated and 20K to boot. All depends on the right lawyer, should OP choose to fight the termination.

HouTx, BSN, MSN, EdD

Specializes in Critical Care, Education. Has 35 years experience.

I believe that there may be a misunderstanding of "right to work state". That term simply means that there can be no 'closed shops' in which all employees MUST join a union. That's all. It does not mean that residents are deprived of rights granted by Federal law. My state has a well-known anti-union/organized labor stance, but that doesn't mean that unions do not exist here because they do.

We can certainly sue for any sort of unlawful treatment, employment discrimination or wrongful termination. This is strongly supported by one of our other 'claims to fame'.... lawyers who are renown for their ultra high-dollar litigation.

CelticGoddess, BSN, RN

Specializes in Palliative, Onc, Med-Surg, Home Hospice. Has 6 years experience.

I believe that there may be a misunderstanding of "right to work state". That term simply means that there can be no 'closed shops' in which all employees MUST join a union. That's all. It does not mean that residents are deprived of rights granted by Federal law. My state has a well-known anti-union/organized labor stance, but that doesn't mean that unions do not exist here because they do.

We can certainly sue for any sort of unlawful treatment, employment discrimination or wrongful termination. This is strongly supported by one of our other 'claims to fame'.... lawyers who are renown for their ultra high-dollar litigation.

Okay, not right to work but at will. SC is an at will state and an employee can be terminated for any reason (or nor reason at all) unless it is based on a protected class. It can be very very difficult to prove wrongful termination in SC. And I have, in the past, tried. My father also tried (he was actually terminated for age) and was not successful (even with a top employment attorney in SC) even though the company he had worked for effed up.

Suing for unlawful treatment and discrimination (which is still hard in this state, just ask my dad) is easier but when you work in an at will state, where it is legal to terminate based on "I don't like you", it's extremely difficult to prove wrongful termination.

Wrongful termination is hard to prove in at will states. Lawyers are expensive. It can be done, however, if your facility has a written protocol for how terminations are supposed to be handled and the facility deviates from that. I'd ask to see your employee handbook if you haven't already got a copy.

klone, MSN, RN

Specializes in OB-Gyn/Primary Care/Ambulatory Leadership. Has 15 years experience.

Not in a right to work state.

The term is "employment at will" - "right to work" is something entirely different.

Here is a tip to ANYONE reading this comment:

If you feel that you have one foot out the door and you are asked to come in and meet with the manager/director/administrator/head honcho, or whatever about an incident (directly related to you), say "I will need to check my schedule. I'll contact you." Then, send a resignation letter in writing, via email, pronto.

Don't give them that chance to say in writing that "we met with so-and-so, and warn so-and-so, and so-and-so's performance is below average, blah, blah blah." Otherwise, the writing goes on your record and you will be blocked from going to another unit at the hospital, even though their accusations are as weak as sin.

Again, don't meet with them. By resigning without a meeting, any negative evaluation post-resignation would look retaliation.

Plus, resigning > termination. With a termination, you have to report the job.

Edited by DTWriter