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RNs tell your hospitals to hire new grads

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by DedHedRN DedHedRN (Member) Member

DedHedRN has 6 years experience and specializes in Medical Surgical.

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You are reading page 11 of RNs tell your hospitals to hire new grads. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

Jenni811 has 3 years experience as a RN and specializes in Intermediate care.

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the "pre-penicillin" nurse calls herself that, she made it up! just thought i'd put that out there. its not us being mean, its all in fun with her.

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OCNRN63 is a RN and specializes in Oncology; medical specialty website.

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Ok, lets just put it this way...we call one of our nurses the "pre-penicillin nurse"...think about it.

One of our nurses has GRANDCHILDREN! that are nurses, and one of her grandchild nurses is having a child. Yes, she is going to be a great-grandma.

...its not the age i dont mind. Because they are good nurses, they know alot and are very compassionate. But when they cannot physically do the labor that is being asked of them, i think thats when it's time to start thinking of something they are capable of doing.

, Im just saying im sick of doing their work for them because "They have a bad back" or "need to rest"

Our patients get turned every 2 hours, and its the job of the RN and the CNA to do their own patients TOGETHER. So every 2 hours we get together with our RN and turn our patients that need to be turned or can't do it themselves.

but when im paired with these nurses (Im still a CNA-transitioning into RN role), i get REALLY frustrated because i have to wait until the other nurses or the other CNA's are done with their patient's so i can get mine turned because the nurse i'm with can't do it, because of her "bad back"

i just had physical eval they do for a job, and it was a requirment that i could lift "50 lbs" Hey...no problem for me!! I'm 22 years old. I can lift 50 lbs. But these nurses im talking about couldnt lift 10 lbs! So what makes it ok for them to not be able to lift 50 lbs.??

But....if i am assigned with a 70 year old something nurse that can physically do the work, without putting extra work on me or other coworkers then GREAT! more power to him/her.

It's easy to sit back and defend these specific nurses, but when you are placed in the position of getting the extra work load, or patient's care is being minimized because their nurse can't do the physical labor, then something needs to change!!

Come back and judge other RNs when you yourself are an RN. What does that mean, "CNA transitioning into RN role", anyway?

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2 Articles; 5,682 Posts; 50,655 Profile Views

One of our nurses has GRANDCHILDREN!
Gasp!

Oh yeah, a number of my coworkers have grandkids...

and what most of them lack in physical prowess, they more than make up for with clinical experience and psychomotor expertise.

The young 'uns contribute their superior physical strength and endurance and the older folks contribute their expertise and reasoning.

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CCL RN has 10 years experience as a RN and specializes in Cath Lab/ ICU.

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Come back and judge other RNs when you yourself are an RN. What does that mean, "CNA transitioning into RN role", anyway?

Exactly.

And just where do they think the "old" nurses hurt their backs?? We are going to have 22yr old CNAs criticizing experienced nurses because, after giving their bodies and souls to nursing, they have a bad back??

Welcome to the state of nursing today. And if that CNA ever fully "transitions" to the role of the RN I hope there aren't 22 year olds behind her waiting for her to flounder as well...

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redhead_NURSE98! is a ADN and specializes in Med/surg, Quality & Risk.

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It's not really that confusing. They went back to school in their late 50s. I had one in my graduating class and there have been a few posters here that are older new grads.

Well see the confusing part is where someone says "Are you really 61" and she says "NO as you can see I'm a new grad looking for a job." So, is she 61, is she a new grad or both? It's all very taxing on my tiny brain.

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Well see the confusing part is where someone says "Are you really 61" and she says "NO as you can see I'm a new grad looking for a job." So, is she 61, is she a new grad or both? It's all very taxing on my tiny brain.

I didn't notice the "no" until I went back and reread the comments after I had already posted that reply. Further confusing is the "1987" in the user name. Of course that could be any significant year, but makes you think it's a birth year, making them 23 or 24.

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nursel56 has 25+ years experience and specializes in Peds/outpatient FP,derm,allergy/private duty.

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the "pre-penicillin" nurse calls herself that, she made it up! just thought i'd put that out there. its not us being mean, its all in fun with her.

That's good! Because otherwise . . .:uhoh21: and really I think you should help her out because the ability to poke fun at yourself is GOLD in our line of work. In fact, I suggest you buy her lunch. Also, her grandchildren, great-grands, great-great-great etc are the cutest things you've ever seen in your life. Signed, post oral polio vaccine nurse.

Have you brought up any of these issues (partner who can't lift with you) with your management/charge nurses?

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Jenni with a little heart over the "i" in pink Sharpie -- that's my guess :D

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eriksoln has 15 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in M/S, Travel Nursing, Pulmonary.

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Ok, lets just put it this way...we call one of our nurses the "pre-penicillin nurse"...think about it.

One of our nurses has GRANDCHILDREN! that are nurses, and one of her grandchild nurses is having a child. Yes, she is going to be a great-grandma.

...its not the age i dont mind. Because they are good nurses, they know alot and are very compassionate. But when they cannot physically do the labor that is being asked of them, i think thats when it's time to start thinking of something they are capable of doing.

, Im just saying im sick of doing their work for them because "They have a bad back" or "need to rest"

Our patients get turned every 2 hours, and its the job of the RN and the CNA to do their own patients TOGETHER. So every 2 hours we get together with our RN and turn our patients that need to be turned or can't do it themselves.

but when im paired with these nurses (Im still a CNA-transitioning into RN role), i get REALLY frustrated because i have to wait until the other nurses or the other CNA's are done with their patient's so i can get mine turned because the nurse i'm with can't do it, because of her "bad back"

i just had physical eval they do for a job, and it was a requirment that i could lift "50 lbs" Hey...no problem for me!! I'm 22 years old. I can lift 50 lbs. But these nurses im talking about couldnt lift 10 lbs! So what makes it ok for them to not be able to lift 50 lbs.??

But....if i am assigned with a 70 year old something nurse that can physically do the work, without putting extra work on me or other coworkers then GREAT! more power to him/her.

It's easy to sit back and defend these specific nurses, but when you are placed in the position of getting the extra work load, or patient's care is being minimized because their nurse can't do the physical labor, then something needs to change!!

I have to step in here. Lots of nurses will more than likely be offended by this but the reality of nursing is.......the labor side of it (lifting, transfering etc.....) is a part of it, and its not optional. You don't get to graduate from doing it.

Being a male nurse gives me a special perspective on it. I have worked on units where nurses finger you as the serogate CNA simply because you are more able to do the physical aspects of the care. I can tell you some stories about how the buck got passed off to me for the "physical labor" that would make your head spin and have you looking for the nurse so you could slap them.

I was lucky though, learned to deal with it at my first job. I had a great group of veteran nurses (thats my term for them anyway) who understood they wanted us (the newer nurses) around. Having us there meant them getting more weekends off, more holidays off, less night shifts etc etc..... They also understood there were nurses who........abused the "teamwork" concept. Always needing me to do this and that for their pt's, but......well......nothing was done for me in return. I'd fall behind from toileting their pts and doing all their lifting, but no help with putting in orders or anything else they could have done.

See........"teamwork" implies a TWO WAY RELATION. If its all just you doing stuff for them and then its all said and done, its not "teamwork", its just you carrying their load.

The problem is, in trying to be superman and make our coworkers happy with us, we forget what our true purpose is.......being there for the pt. You aren't doing your patients any favors if you are running around playing serogate CNA, but their meds are late, they have to wait longer for pain meds, orders take longer to get implemented and they don't get the same level of TLC as the other nurse's pt's. Sometimes, mediating for our patients means deflecting needy nurses and spending time with the pt.

The true "team" nurses at my first job taught me where to draw the line between "helping" someone and being taken advantage of. You'll learn where that line is for you too. Biggest thing to remember is, if your pt. care is suffering due to too much time being spent with needy nurse.......time to draw the line.

Now, on the other hand, if you are getting help with orders and they don't mind running and getting pain meds while you are being serogate CNA.........no problem.

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Hoozdo has 15 years experience as a ADN and specializes in ICU, Research, Corrections.

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But when they cannot physically do the labor that is being asked of them, i think thats when it's time to start thinking of something they are capable of doing.

, Im just saying im sick of doing their work for them because "They have a bad back" or "need to rest"

Our patients get turned every 2 hours, and its the job of the RN and the CNA to do their own patients TOGETHER. So every 2 hours we get together with our RN and turn our patients that need to be turned or can't do it themselves.

but when im paired with these nurses (Im still a CNA-transitioning into RN role), i get REALLY frustrated because i have to wait until the other nurses or the other CNA's are done with their patient's so i can get mine turned because the nurse i'm with can't do it, because of her "bad back"

i just had physical eval they do for a job, and it was a requirment that i could lift "50 lbs" Hey...no problem for me!! I'm 22 years old. I can lift 50 lbs. But these nurses im talking about couldnt lift 10 lbs! So what makes it ok for them to not be able to lift 50 lbs.??

50 pounds? :lol2: I can lift 50 pounds with no problem and I am older than 50.

The problem is, I have never had a pt that weighed 50 pounds. 500 pounds is

more like it. When you have 500 pounds of intubated, sedated weight talk to me

about lifting a mere 50 pounds. I ripped cartilage from my rib cage lifting a 500

pounder with one person's help, and it WILL NEVER happen again.

There's nothing wrong with asking for EXTRA lifting help for dead weight > 300

lbs and I don't care how old you are.

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SummitRN has 5 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in ICU.

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No, your wrong. I provided hard data on birth rates for the last 100 years. Its not speculation - there will be a massive increase in people needing care in the next 20 years. Unless they invent a way to reverse the aging process.

You assume both that the economy will improve significantly and that care will be provided in the same model as now. Neither is necessarily the case, particularly as one requires the other!

If the economy is slow and haggard, if we experience stagnation (or stagflation), there will NOT be more jobs, and the new care requirements will result in diluted quality (read non-RN care) to handle the increased demands at lower cost.

The problem isn't that there isn't a "need" per se, but that management has learned they don't have to fill the need or they can improve the tech : patient ratio for cheaper than the RN : patient ratio. When the economy improves, what motivation will management have to change this new status quo, especially as reimbursements drop?

Further, even if your peachy scenario came to fruition (and we all hope it does), the ever accelerating rate of new grad production can still outstrip increased future employment demands, especially as the market already has a ever growing backlog of unemployed NGs.

Lastly, the majority of NGs are not entering the profession looking for careers in LTC or HH (nothing wrong with LTC or HH, it is just not what many desire). I agree that is where the new demand will be until nonRNs take over the role, but that is not where the majority new blood wants to be nor remain for long. A possible scenario is that the nursing shortage will return to HH and LTC while acute positions grow increasingly competitive and the lifespan of the NG in the job market will be increasingly short as those unable to find the nursingjob they want switch careers after a few years in LTC.

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