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Quo Vadis?

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Specializes in LTC, assisted living, med-surg, psych. Has 20 years experience.

Is it time to quit?

For those who know little of Latin, the phrase means "Where are you going?" An aging nurse stands at a crossroads in both her career and her life, agonizing over the choices before her and wondering which direction she should take. Should she fight for what was once the best job she's ever had, or start looking for another? Even more critical, should she try harder, knowing that she's already given it her all.....or accept the truth that it's over?

Quo Vadis?

Life, as my grandmother used to say is a very odd little duck......you live through five or six decades, fashioning an existence that (hopefully) reflects your values, and learning to be at peace with who you are and where you're going. Then suddenly "stuff" gets real, and you find yourself standing at a crossroads where you're given a list of choices as to where you want to go next; the only option you don't have is staying where you are.

I just arrived at that intersection yesterday. And I already hate it here.

For some time now, I've been battling a personal issue that I've realized---too late---really does affect my work, no matter how much I wish it weren't so or how often I've denied it. Now it's developed a new wrinkle that is likely going to cost me my job in the short run, and perhaps my career as well: I've developed work-related anxiety attacks.

I don't mean just a little nervousness, or the stray "Omigosh, I can't do this anymore!" I'm talking about a primal fear that floods my entire body with stress hormones that I can literally feel---my heart flutters wildly, my stomach turns to stone and drops into my pelvic floor, my throat closes up, and my hands shake like leaves in a brisk wind.....all because I can no longer perform consistently at the level of intensity my job demands.

Naturally, I was the last person to figure this out. I've been clinging desperately to life at work since the disastrous state survey in which my department was scourged ferociously for multiple documentation issues. Six months later, we still have not succeeded in passing. And I have it on good authority that if we don't pass the next re-survey, the top three managers will be replaced.

I'm number two. In more ways than I'd prefer to count.

Look, I get it. I've been in this business long enough to know more than I ever wanted to about the 'business end' of things. I myself have fired people for poor performance; it doesn't take a Donald Trump to figure out who their problem children are and get rid of them before they can cause even more trouble.

None of that mattered one bit to a certain MD I see pretty frequently, who promptly took note of how stressed-out I am and wrote an order taking me out of work for a minimum of ten days. This is not to say I had no choice in the matter; unfortunately, the options were limited to either taking time off---NOW---or going inpatient.

I chose the timeout.

Now my boss is upset, and the rumors are spreading among the staff like wildfire. My condition is not the world's best-kept secret, but until now I never thought of it as a career-killer. Maybe it doesn't have to be.....but I do know that I'm done at my current position. Oh, I'll still be employed for a bit longer while the TPTB figure out how to dump me without running afoul of the Americans with Disabilities Act, but eventually they will. I know it as well as I know my own name.

That said, I've never worked with better people. My boss, my co-workers, my subordinates, and most of my residents are simply awesome. (I could do without the families, but that's a whole 'nother subject.) I hate the idea that I will soon be leaving them, even if I do manage to get my department through this next survey. Bottom line, I can't take the pressure anymore, and it's time for me to own up to that.

It's often said that God never gives us more than we can handle. But as a dear friend of mine says, He sometimes does hand us a burden that we cannot bear, so He also gives us wisdom to know when something is no longer ours to handle.

I am not there yet. Someday in the not-too-distant future I will be, but I have this crossroads to navigate before I can be on my way........and oh, so much more to learn.

I'm a Registered Nurse and writer who, in better times, has enjoyed a busy and varied career which includes stints as a Med/Surg floor nurse, a director of nursing, a nurse consultant, and an assistant administrator. And when I'm not working as a nurse, I'm writing about nursing right here at allnurses.com and putting together the chapters for a future book about---what else?---nursing.

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25 Comment(s)

Esme12, ASN, BSN, RN

Specializes in Critical Care, ED, Cath lab, CTPAC,Trauma. Has 41 years experience.

Viva!!! ((HUGS))

I hear what you are saying......

Quote
It's often said that God never gives us more than we can handle. But as a dear friend of mine says, He sometimes does hand us a burden that we cannot bear, so He also gives us wisdom to know when something is no longer ours to handle.

But I have so many days I wish he didn't trust me so much!!!

We are kindred souls you and I for different reasons.......and walk the same path....((HUGS))

motherof3sons

Specializes in LTC. Has 22 years experience.

May you find peace with the decisions you need to make and a ton of wisdom as you travel this road.

Ginger's Mom, MSN, RN

Has 41 years experience.

Viva, while you feel committed to this position ,there is no shame in moving to a less stressful position. I do not know the reasons why you failed the audit, but my past experience has been that there could be many factors such as lack of support from HQ, lack of staff, unreasonable auditor, etc usually it is a system failure not a failure of one person.

Marisette, BSN, RN

Specializes in Registered Nurse. Has 28 years experience.

I have struggled with state audits during my nursing career, past most, but there were two that I had "conditions" placed and I had to undergo a second audit or a corrective action plan. I felt that it would be the end of my career and that I could be fired. I was fortunate and finally passed inspections so I don't think you should give up. However, having the threat of not passing inspections is a heavy burden to bear. I no longer wish to live with the threat and the anxiety that goes with it. So I do my best and whenever the anxiety kicks in, I daydream about my back up plan. I don't feel committed to my employer, so it may be easier for me. I realize that I may not find another nursing job at my age and with my experience. But, I'm prepared to take a pay cut, leave nursing and work at walmart, if I must. I keep telling myself it will be difficult, but I will survive if it ever comes to that. So do your best, but know that if things don't go as planned, you will survive. It will be a new chapter in your life, but you will survive...

Nascar nurse, ASN, RN

Specializes in LTC & Hospice. Has 35 years experience.

Hugs to you Viva - You may have your moments of weakness, but you also display a great deal of strength. Let that carry you thru whatever path you go down.

cherryames1949

Specializes in Oncology&Homecare. Has 27 years experience.

Viva, I was so sorry to read this article. You are obviously in distress. You are a bright, talented, can do nurse. I think that the universe and your body are sending you a message. Enough is enough. I don't have to tell you that stress can kill. I don't have any answers for you because only you can find the right answer for yourself. I do know that you have the support of all of your followers on all nurses. I'm sending you positive thoughts and prayers. You will get through this. It won't be easy but I have faith in you.

You have so much knowledge, so much experience..ever thought about becoming a contractor for surveys? If not working for those who actually conduct them what about a company that helps others get through them - like "mock" surveys? Two different places I worked used contractors like this to come in before state hit & point out where the weaknesses were, etc. They were invaluable to these facilities and both places never failed nor received an flags because of using this pre-survey service. You could consider working for the state surveyors as well...whatever you chose, where ever you land, the employer will be lucky to have you. As bad as you feel and as hard as this time is, you will get through this - like others on here, I'm rooting for you!

VivaLasViejas, ASN, RN

Specializes in LTC, assisted living, med-surg, psych. Has 20 years experience.

You know what's funny.......during my grilling session with the surveyors, I was joking around a little and told them I'd almost gone over to the "dark side" a few years back. They grinned and one person said in all seriousness, "Hey you could still come over to the dark side, we have openings." I can think of worse fates. :sneaky:

Why don't you retrain as a dental assistant or something.

Less pay probably but not all that anxiety, stress, responsibility and liability.

Baubo516, RN

Specializes in Skilled Nursing/Rehab. Has 3 years experience.

I understand the feeling of loyalty to your employers and coworkers, and the pain of having to make a decision to change your path. I believe that in the end, you should not sacrifice your health and mental well-being for a job, even if it has been a vocation for you. This is what led me to change careers and head toward nursing.

I wish you peace and comfort as you navigate this crossroads in your life.

Your posts have inspired me for a few years now. You have such kindness in your heart. You are a good person and deserve to be happy going into work everyday. Something better is out there for you. You can not watch every single person in your facility every second to make sure that they do not make a mistake when State is in surveying your facility, I am sure you did the best you could. Keep your chin up Viva!!!!!!!!!!!!

Thank you for sharing this!

Esme12, ASN, BSN, RN

Specializes in Critical Care, ED, Cath lab, CTPAC,Trauma. Has 41 years experience.

VivaLasViejas said:
You know what's funny.......during my grilling session with the surveyors, I was joking around a little and told them I'd almost gone over to the "dark side" a few years back. They grinned and one person said in all seriousness, "Hey you could still come over to the dark side, we have openings." I can think of worse fates. :sneaky:

State or JACHO? Doesn't matter.....I have to secretly share...it's not a bad gig....:up:

heron, ASN, RN

Specializes in Hospice. Has 40 years experience.

At 63 yo, I'm finding that sheer fatigue is really affecting my ability to do my job competently. While neither emotionally nor financially ready to retire, I've had to ask myself whether I want to end a 40+ year career by causing harm or getting fired. It kind of put it into perspective for me and by August I'll either be part time or resigned, depending on which way my DON jumps.

Here's a thought - maybe mgt would consider accepting a resignation then hiring you as a consultant to help your replacement get thru the next survey ... You get out from under and facility still gets the benefit of your expertise. And you wouldn't be leaving your coworkers and residents in the lurch.

Whatever ... The idea of a consulting gig or "going to the dark side" seem promising.

Am thinking the good thought for you!

elprup, BSN, RN

Has 2 years experience.

I remember reading something Mother Theresa suppsedly said in response to the saying, "God only gives us as much as we can handle." Mother Teresa's reply, "How strong does he think I am?!" Fitting, I think. Best wishes.

God has reasons for everything , even the smallest thing He placed here on earth - He does it for a reason....

and .... even in the worst situation in our life ,there is wisdom that He wants you to understand. Trust Him with all your heart because He loves you...