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Esme12

Esme12

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  1. Esme12

    Passed my NCLEX-RN! My NCLEX Review Material Tips

    You do realize that post was from 2 years ago and the notes are on the original first post. 25855834-Nclex-Study-Guide Must READ before test.pdf (251.8 KB, 80072 views) LabValues[1]nclex review2.docx (11.8 KB, 139423 views)
  2. Esme12

    Passed my NCLEX-RN! My NCLEX Review Material Tips

    You do realize that post was from 2 years ago and the notes are on the original first post. 25855834-Nclex-Study-Guide Must READ before test.pdf (251.8 KB, 80072 views) LabValues[1]nclex review2.docx (11.8 KB, 139423 views)
  3. Esme12

    Measles, Mumps, Rubella... Forgotten but NOT Gone

    This is one of those subjects that people are passionate about. On both sides. I think there has been a TON of misinformation out there about vaccination from both sides. I am mistrustful of BIG PHARMA. They have covered bad things in the past...what stops them from it now? I have vaccinated my children and will continue to do so. That being said there are some vaccinations I am mistrustful of...for me it's the HPV and Flu. It is a benefit versus risk. Unfortunately with my daughter entering nursing school she no longer has a right to refuse the Flu vaccine and being 18 needs to make that decision. I pray she will be fine. I truly wish someone would study the effects of life long vaccinations on the immune system with the rise in auto-immune disorders...are we stressing the immune system to the brink that if feels the body itself is something to attack? It makes me wonder. Allnurses promotes a good debate...as long as the posters remain polite.
  4. Esme12

    concept mapping for pneumonia

    Care plans really aren't that hard with the right resources and assessment about what your patient needs. Many nursing students over this this process and become over whelmed. Think about your care plan as a recipe card for how to care for the patient step by step. So, when you ask about a care plan...tell us about your patient. What did you see? What did they say? What does your brain tell you that they need. Let the patient/patient assessment drive your diagnosis. Do not try to fit the patient to the diagnosis you found first. You need to know the pathophysiology of your disease process. You need to assess your patient, collect data then find a diagnosis. Let the patient data drive that diagnosis. So......back to square one.....What is your assessment? What are the vital signs? What is your patient saying?. Is the the patient having pain? Are they having difficulty with ADLS? What teaching do they need? What does the patient need? What is the most important to them now? What is important for them to know in the future. TELL ME ABOUT YOUR PATIENT...:) The medical diagnosis is the disease itself. It is what the patient has not necessarily what the patient needs. the nursing diagnosis is what are you going to do about it, what are you going to look for, and what do you need to do/look for first. From what you posted I do not have the information necessary to make a nursing diagnosis. Care plans when you are in school are teaching you what you need to do to actually look for, what you need to do to intervene and improve for the patient to be well and return to their previous level of life or to make them the best you you can be. It is trying to teach you how to think like a nurse. Think of the care plan as a recipe to caring for your patient. your plan of how you are going to care for them. how you are going to care for them. what you want to happen as a result of your caring for them. What would you like to see for them in the future, even if that goal is that you don't want them to become worse, maintain the same, or even to have a peaceful pain free death. Every single nursing diagnosis has its own set of symptoms, or defining characteristics. they are listed in the NANDA taxonomy and in many of the current nursing care plan books that are currently on the market that include nursing diagnosis information. You need to have access to these books when you are working on care plans. You need to use the nursing diagnoses that NANDA has defined and given related factors and defining characteristics for. These books have what you need to get this information to help you in writing care plans so you diagnose your patients correctly. Don't focus your efforts on the nursing diagnoses when you should be focusing on the assessment and the patients abnormal data that you collected. These will become their symptoms, or what NANDA calls defining characteristics. From a very wise AN contributor Daytonite.......make sure you follow these steps first and in order and let the patient drive your diagnosis not try to fit the patient to the diagnosis you found first. Here are the steps of the nursing process and what you should be doing in each step when you are doing a written care plan: ADPIE Care plan reality: The foundation of any care plan is the signs, symptoms or responses that patient is having to what is happening to them. What is happening to them could be the medical disease, a physical condition, a failure to perform ADLS (activities of daily living), or a failure to be able to interact appropriately or successfully within their environment. Therefore, one of your primary goals as a problem solver is to collect as much data as you can get your hands on. The more the better. You have to be the detective and always be on the alert and lookout for clues, at all times, and that is Step #1 of the nursing process. Assessment is an important skill. It will take you a long time to become proficient in assessing patients. Assessment not only includes doing the traditional head-to-toe exam, but also listening to what patients have to say and questioning them. History can reveal import clues. It takes time and experience to know what questions to ask to elicit good answers (interview skills). Part of this assessment process is knowing the pathophysiology of the medical disease or condition that the patient has. But, there will be times that this won't be known. Just keep in mind that you have to be like a nurse detective always snooping around and looking for those clues. A nursing diagnosis standing by itself means nothing. The meat of this care plan of yours will lie in the abnormal data (symptoms) that you collected during your assessment of this patient......in order for you to pick any nursing diagnoses for a patient you need to know what the patient's symptoms are. Although your patient isn't real you do have information available. What I would suggest you do is to work the nursing process from step #1. Take a look at the information you collected on the patient during your physical assessment and review of their medical record. Start making a list of abnormal data which will now become a list of their symptoms. Don't forget to include an assessment of their ability to perform ADLS (because that's what we nurses shine at). The ADLS are bathing, dressing, transferring from bed or chair, walking, eating, toilet use, and grooming. and, one more thing you should do is to look up information about symptoms that stand out to you. What is the physiology and what are the signs and symptoms (manifestations) you are likely to see in the patient. did you miss any of the signs and symptoms in the patient? if so, now is the time to add them to your list. This is all part of preparing to move onto step #2 of the process which is determining your patient's problem and choosing nursing diagnoses. but, you have to have those signs, symptoms and patient responses to back it all up. Care plan reality: What you are calling a nursing diagnosis is actually a shorthand label for the patient problem.. The patient problem is more accurately described in the definition of the nursing diagnosis. Critical Thinking Flow Sheet for Nursing Students(1).doc
  5. Esme12

    concept mapping for pneumonia

    Concept Mapping Homepage How to construct a concept map. These are really helpful links.....I am not a big fan of them....you can also purchase care map software. here is an example.....NUR 421_CONCEPT MAP PROJECT_CHF
  6. Esme12

    Passed my NCLEX-RN! My NCLEX Review Material Tips

    here it is try thisLabValues[1]nclex review2(2).docx
  7. Esme12

    Cannabis and Healthcare 2014

    It is good to note that the state boards in Colorado have not changed their views on the use of marijuana The nursing board follows the physician point of view.
  8. Esme12

    Losing my religion

    MODERATOR NOTE: Several posts have been deleted. This thread is about THE PATIENT and their religiosity and our obligation to promote and support the patient regardless of OUR beliefs. If members want to debate personal religion please start a thread in the breakroom.... Ethics / Philosophy / Religion Please stick to topic....
  9. Esme12

    Losing my religion

    MODERATOR NOTE: Allnurses allows debates....but responses must be polite and constructive Further posts will be edited/deleted and points assigned. This is the spirituality forum.
  10. Esme12

    Losing my religion

    I agree.....I agree.
  11. Esme12

    Losing my religion

    Politically correct
  12. Esme12

    Losing my religion

    I think those nurses are unprofessional regardless of their religion....or their verbal regurgitation of their personal life. By no means are all nurses who feel religion should be left at home unprofessional. It is a constant battle with my teens about over sharing in any circumstance. Social media has given people verbal diarrhea that I find puzzling.....what is up with this over sharing???? I am for leaving religion at home.....with my personal life. It is NOT my patients business to know my business. Oh, I share certain things, like I have a crazy camera hog weimaraner, or my children did such and such ....if the conversation warrants it.....to make the patient feel I am sharing (although, heavily edited for privacy sake)....patients want to feel comforted and less vulnerable.
  13. Esme12

    Losing my religion

    Here is the deal.....no one is asking anyone to "lose their religion" it's a euphemism. Even the best patient, who asked you to pray, can report you for "preaching" to them and you will find yourself in hot water. I have seen it. Patients feel it intrusive...even if they believe the same thing. Each nurse will have to judge for his/her self whether the risk is worth it. If it is...then so be it. However, be prepared for the consequences. I worked for years in a Catholic facility. I loved morning blessings and that mass will be celebrated in the chapel...I miss that feeling of familiarity of peace. They are no longer said because of religious freedom and those who are not catholic were offended....sometimes being PC isn't what it's cracked up to be. sigh.... It is about the patient and not the nurse. Regardless of your personal beliefs....I believe it just doesn't belong at the bedside.
  14. Esme12

    Losing my religion

    MODERATOR NOTE: Several posts have been edited. Personal attacks will not be tolerated. Please be respectful of each other when posting.....these polarizing topics are important for awareness and to improve who we are as nurses.
  15. Esme12

    Losing my religion

    These posts are always polarizing...religion is a very personal topic and always highly debated. I am always respectful of every religion and all beliefs ...or lack there of....for it isn't about me....it's about them....the PATIENT. I am confused when people demand tolerance yet throw an opposing clergy out of a hospital room or feel in some way they must educate a complete stranger about the benefits for Jesus Christ. I also realize that when people react strongly it is out of grief and I take no personal offense....again is isn't about me because I am the nurse. When my BIL lay dying I accepted all prayer for I needed all the help I could get, from what ever source possible, to help give my sister and my nieces find strength and peace for death was inevitable. I was not offended that the clergy in house was not of my specific religion. For I always had the opportunity to politely decline. What is important is that religion...it is for the PATIENT, about the PATIENT, about what the PATIENT needs. It has nothing what so ever to do with the nurse other than what is important to the patient. I have been in rooms when prayers of many kinds are prayer and blessings given.......whether or not I agree is of NO consequence....I bow my head out of respect for my PATIENT and the family. REGARDLESS of their beliefs or lack of beliefs. We need to be RESPECTFUL at ALL times especially of each other.
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