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New Grad COVID

Updated | Posted

Has 1 years experience.

Some advice on whether to take this job would be so awesome!

I graduated and passed my NCLEX already. I interviewed for a CV PCU in AZ that changed over to a COVID PCU. During the interviewing process, I learned that I was on orientation for 3 months, but only guaranteed a preceptor for 1 month. They said they would increase times for me to make sure I'm safe but, "asking for a preceptor for 3 months is a lot to ask for a new grad that's too many resources to dedicate on one person." They then explained they offered one of the best orientations in the area(AZ), but I am well aware of many programs with at least 3 months with a preceptor. They are also offering no PTO, so if I catch COVID, they will furlough me so I can collect unemployment if it's longer-term. My old classmates already working there one in a PCU has a preceptor for 3 months, and the other in mother-baby has a preceptor for 1 month. I am not sure if I should just expect a longer preceptorship like my PCU classmate or be prepared to be thrown out on my own to early, possibly. I have been going back and forth on this opportunity jobs are so hard to find and maybe I am just being a baby. The experience skill-wise is going to be amazing. I just don't know if I feel safe with those possible conditions, and I would be moving back to a place where I really don't have many friends, and don't like the town. I still have another 2-5 months for my California license to come through (where I live now).

Does this sound like a good/safe job for myself and my license to take?

7 hours ago, Kitkat191 said:

"asking for a preceptor for 3 months is a lot to ask for a new grad that's too many resources to dedicate on one person."

Hm. I wish there was an emoji for this.

Well, I guess I would start by saying that if they can't provide the bare minimum that most people in your situation need, they have no business hiring new grads.

I give admins credit though, they never run out of ways to spin a situation or ways to disparage a nurse, either one. These people love to hire new grads and apparently now they have decided to just brazenly make it look like there's something wrong with wanting an appropriate training.

7 hours ago, Kitkat191 said:

They are also offering no PTO, so if I catch COVID

Well, that's one scenario.

So you get no vacation, either?

7 hours ago, Kitkat191 said:

They then explained they offered one of the best orientations in the area(AZ)

They also believe you are dumb enough to believe bald-faced lies.

I'm guessing these people utterly suck, but the really sad news is that they may not be much different from anywhere else or any other offer you might get.

7 hours ago, Kitkat191 said:

Does this sound like a good/safe job for myself and my license to take? 

No...

There's no way I would move states to a town I didn't like to work for these people.

But, others have different motivations, needs and goals.

Best of luck ~

ETA I will say this: There's principles and ideals, and then there is what can be accomplished if you have your own goals and a positive mindset--meaning you are mentally tough and capable of pushing through no matter what happens. You could choose to do that in this scenario. But what you shouldn't do is believe that "it won't be that bad." Because it sounds ridiculous. If you can handle ridiculous then go for it.

Edited by JKL33

Sour Lemon

Has 9 years experience.

11 hours ago, Kitkat191 said:

Some advice on whether to take this job would be so awesome!

I graduated and passed my NCLEX already. I interviewed for a CV PCU in AZ that changed over to a COVID PCU. During the interviewing process, I learned that I was on orientation for 3 months, but only guaranteed a preceptor for 1 month. They said they would increase times for me to make sure I'm safe but, "asking for a preceptor for 3 months is a lot to ask for a new grad that's too many resources to dedicate on one person." They then explained they offered one of the best orientations in the area(AZ), but I am well aware of many programs with at least 3 months with a preceptor. They are also offering no PTO, so if I catch COVID, they will furlough me so I can collect unemployment if it's longer-term. My old classmates already working there one in a PCU has a preceptor for 3 months, and the other in mother-baby has a preceptor for 1 month. I am not sure if I should just expect a longer preceptorship like my PCU classmate or be prepared to be thrown out on my own to early, possibly. I have been going back and forth on this opportunity jobs are so hard to find and maybe I am just being a baby. The experience skill-wise is going to be amazing. I just don't know if I feel safe with those possible conditions, and I would be moving back to a place where I really don't have many friends, and don't like the town. I still have another 2-5 months for my California license to come through (where I live now).

Does this sound like a good/safe job for myself and my license to take?

That sounds terrible, but it really comes down to what better options you might have. I especially like the part about them furloughing you if you get sick. How kind and helpful of them. I literally laughed.

One month with a preceptor doesn't seem anywhere adequate for a new graduate. I suppose it could be okay if you'll be working with a bunch of senior nurses available and willing to help, but that most likely won't be the case.

Nunya, BSN

Specializes in NICU/Mother-Baby/Peds/Mgmt. Has 39 years experience.

How can you be on orientation for 3 months without a guaranteed preceptor for (possibly) two of those months? 🤔. In my book that's called a one month orientation. I have never been told this, after 30 years and 13 inpatient jobs and 3 clinic jobs. Do you just ask whoever is around if you have questions? You sure better hope they want to teach you, have the time and know what they're talking about. I wouldn't do it with all my experience and you shouldn't do it as a new nurse, I can't imagine you'll get any support if you make a mistake. Don't do it.

Edit: reread your post, one month in MBU for your friend? That sounds incredibly dangerous, new Moms and babies can crump incredibly fast. I suggest you stay out of AZ altogether if that's how they train nurses.

Edited by Nunya

mmc51264, ADN, BSN, MSN, RN

Specializes in orthopedic; Informatics, diabetes. Has 9 years experience.

Run. If anything, new grads need more time WITH a preceptor now more than ever as many new grads had virtual clinical. We are extending time w/new grads

NRSKarenRN, BSN, RN

Specializes in Vents, Telemetry, Home Care, Home infusion. Has 44 years experience.

AZ is COVID hot spot.

If hospital FT is working 3-12hr shifts/week--- one month with a preceptor is total of 12 shifts --- INADEQUATE with today's acutely ill hospitalized patients + add in COVID precautions/issues. Sense desperate facility that's hiring new grads as experienced staff left due to covid fears or they are out on FMLA/quarantine.

You need to check HR at other hospitals/facilities to get the lowdown on new grad orientation. Not a safe orientation IMHO.

Nurse SMS, MSN, RN

Specializes in Critical Care; Cardiac; Professional Development. Has 10 years experience.

This would be a hard No.

In another lifetime, I worked at a major US airport as a customer service rep for a major airline. Our computer training lasted 6 weeks and we had to have a station "buddy" with us for 3 weeks solid to show us the way. This was just to check-in people and bags, do basic ticketing and send them off to worldwide destinations!

Your potential job gives you 4 weeks training dealing with very, very sick people VS. my old job giving me 3 weeks of checking in suitcases and giving seat assignments.

Yeah, that's a hard NO on this job in AZ!

FallingInPlace, ADN, BSN, RN

Specializes in Med Surg, Hospice, Wound Care. Has 8 years experience.

My experience as a nurse on a COVID med-surg unit is that our patients get sick incredibly fast, and newer nurses struggle with identifying that. You develop your 6th sense after your first year of nursing, and learn what to do about it. The first year is so incredibly difficult and important for developing your nursing skills. I cannot emphasize enough that they would be putting you in a very difficult position, and it just shows their desperation and lack of commitment to patient safety and staff development. Like everyone else has said, no way! Find a place that is willing to invest in YOU.

jb_mmmm, BSN, RN

Specializes in Rehabilitation. Has 2 years experience.

He** no any unit that thinks three months is too much for a new grad is trying to yeet you out by yourself too early. go to another unit thatll guarantee your three months of preceptorship, and advocare for yourself if they try to cheat you out of it too

Edited by jb_mmmm

HiddencatBSN, BSN

Specializes in Peds ED. Has 10 years experience.

I’m so confused how they can call it a 3 month orientation when only 1 month is with a preceptor. This sounds awful. When I’ve changed jobs I often get 8-10 weeks orientation as an EXPERIENCED nurse. My current facility has new grads on orientation for 6 months in specialty/high acuity areas.

Another vote for NO.

On 8/22/2020 at 7:30 PM, HiddencatBSN said:

I’m so confused how they can call it a 3 month orientation when only 1 month is with a preceptor.

IMO there is pathology in there somewhere. The person who says stuff like this with the expectation that anyone is going to believe it has a real problem.

 

Tweety, BSN, RN

Specializes in Med-Surg, Trauma, Ortho, Neuro, Cardiac. Has 28 years experience.

Must agree with the above that there are red flags here and it's a good idea for you not to take this job.  

Kitkat191, BSN, RN

Has 1 years experience.

I have declined the job after reading all the advice. I'm glad I reached out when my head wasn't listening to my gut. I was able to find a job elsewhere with an amazing orientation starting soon. Thank you everyone who responded. 

Sour Lemon

Has 9 years experience.

49 minutes ago, Kitkat191 said:

I have declined the job after reading all the advice. I'm glad I reached out when my head wasn't listening to my gut. I was able to find a job elsewhere with an amazing orientation starting soon. Thank you everyone who responded. 

Congratulations!

Wonderful!