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Is it easier?

Has 20 years experience.

Do you think it is an easier adjustment to go from LPN to RN than it would have been having no previous knowledge of nursing?

Or does it make it more difficult because you have preconceived ideas and your own way of doing things, and school teaches differently?

I find my education has been easier for the nursing part, because I have learned so much by being a LPN. However, I have run into a few obstacles where my already being a nurse has caused a bit of confusion...nothing major, thank goodness, just a glitch or two here and there....

and some of the "other" classes...well...let's just say....:uhoh3:

What do you all think?

GooeyRN, ASN, RN

Has 12 years experience. Specializes in Psych, Med/Surg, LTC.

I was an LPN before becoming an RN. I found it much easier this way. You don't have to learn all of the terminology, you have the basics, and already have practice w/ a lot of the skills, so you aren't as nervous in clinical. Its just difficult to remember to do things "by the book" in clinicals sometimes if you have developed any bad habits. I prefered not to let teachers know that I was an LPN. This way I wasn't expected to know everything, or though of as "the class know it all".

Marie_LPN, RN, LPN, RN

Specializes in 5 yrs OR, ASU Pre-Op 2 yr. ER.

I feel like i have a leg-up on things. I have a remote idea of what to expect, and some of this stuff isn't new to me.

Yet then again, if the prof. knows i'm a nurse, they almost see that as a "well you know this already."

candykane

Specializes in LTC, CCU.

I feel being a LPN has been a tremendous help in the RN program. The traditional students did not have a pharmacology class. They are learning a few drugs along with the disease process. I feel already being familiar with lots of the drugs and the uses of them has affected my grades as well knowing lab values.

I would have to say it has been so much easier for me compared to not having any nursing knowledge.

mhull

Has 8 years experience. Specializes in ER (My favorite), NICU, Hospice.

i don't think it is easier, but it sure has helped having my lpn and working as one. i am glad i have done my education this way.

michelle

luv4nursing

Has 5 years experience. Specializes in Med/Surg, Tele, Peds, LDRP.

I think it makes it much easier. My teachers from school say that the community college says the LPN grads, especially from our program, come well prepared and tend to be highly successful-especially clinically. They consider LPN school a crash course nursing program, and RN goes back to fill in the gaps and go in greater detail. Not to mention the big raise! ;)

rehab nurse

Specializes in rehab; med/surg; l&d; peds/home care.

i definately think being a lpn helped me tackle my seven nursing courses. a lot of it was refresher type things. i was young when i did my lpn program, just 18, and it was a hard year taking 61 credits over three semesters. it didn't come together until the end of the year. but i have learned a tremendous amount of information in the "real world", things you can't learn in school. and i believe this helped me with the lpn-rn transition, and i definately think it will help me be a better RN.

one thing i am scared of is being "the RN", since in my classes as an lpn, it was drilled in our heads, "if you need help, or don't know something...take it to the RN!!". that was the answer to EVERYTHING. so i am a little scared that i will now be the RN! lol...

i am looking forward to starting a new chapter in my life as an RN. hopefully next fall i'll finally be one! esp since i have another 30 or so years to work, i need some other options besides LTC...that has really burned me out:stone

there i go blabbing again...sorry!

oh yeah, in response to someone's question about courses we are taking..

i'm taking: psychology of adulthood and aging, life span psychology, ethics, and pathology. this past year i've taken (all through Excelsior): a&p, micro, foundations of gerontology, nursing concepts 1 through 7. next semester i'm taking english comp and then i'm done except for the cpne! i'll be eligible to be on the wait list for cpne at the end of december!

Kelly_the_Great

Specializes in home & public health, med-surg, hospice.

Definitely easier (so far - haven't gotten to pedi or ob yet & haven't worked in them either so we'll see).

Ironically, the theory classes have been a lot easier for me than my peers. It's kind of funny because I think theory is usually the one thing I think most people think separates the vocational nurse from professional.

Clinicals have been harder, well, not harder, not any harder than LVN clinicals were but I get assigned more difficult/complex patients than my peers often and less guidance because it's assumed I can "handle it" as one instructor said recently.

michelle95

Specializes in Geriatrics, DD, Peri-op.

I know that I am not a student now...but, I just graduated from the RN program after 6 years of being an LPN.

My biggest problem with RN school is that I felt that clinicals were a huge waste of time for me. Don't get me wrong, I learned some things but having to stand around waiting for a teacher so I could give an insulin shot or nystatin swish and swallow was very frustrating. The problem is having to blend in with the generic RN students. If they could set up a special program in which there are just LPNs, the time it takes to obtain an RN degree could probably be shortened.

As far as if my LPN helped me? Yes, definitely. In class, I could relate certain patient situations to whatever the teacher was talking about. Then, light bulbs went off.

one thing i am scared of is being "the RN", since in my classes as an lpn, it was drilled in our heads, "if you need help, or don't know something...take it to the RN!!". that was the answer to EVERYTHING. so i am a little scared that i will now be the RN! lol...

This is the biggest hurdle that I have to overcome. Right now I am working on a telemtry/progressive care floor. I have some pretty critical patients at times. Today I had a guy on a dopamine drip....I was kind of freaking about that. It is a lot of responsibility. I'll probably head back to LTC soon. I like stability and routine.

Half of my class was LPNs and they were much better at clinicals. They also seemed much less stressed out. Though there seemed to be no advantage with raw test scores they were better at applying the knowledge. Over all I would say it is an advantage.

meownsmile, BSN, RN

Specializes in Med/Surg, Ortho.

I think technically, it made things a bit easier because most of the things your getting are familiar, however, learning how to think like an RN is the biggest change.

oldnurse newnurse

Has 12 years experience. Specializes in Gerontology.

it helps in some ways but in some ways it does not help. Graduating 12/18/05 pinning 12/11/05 BSN-RN

Meo is right IMHO. Critical thinking is the core of being an RN (though I have worked with experienced LVN's that are quite adept at it). Love that kitty Meo!:)

meownsmile, BSN, RN

Specializes in Med/Surg, Ortho.

Meo is right IMHO. Critical thinking is the core of being an RN (though I have worked with experienced LVN's that are quite adept at it). Love that kitty Meo!:)

thanks,,

luv4nursing

Has 5 years experience. Specializes in Med/Surg, Tele, Peds, LDRP.

I think I have good clinical thinking skills so I hope the RN program wont be too difficult. My challenge is I am good at being able to choose the right thing to do, but what about when you have to think it up all on your own? ;) lol

meownsmile, BSN, RN

Specializes in Med/Surg, Ortho.

I think I have good clinical thinking skills so I hope the RN program wont be too difficult. My challenge is I am good at being able to choose the right thing to do, but what about when you have to think it up all on your own? ;) lol

You mean when you have to improvise? That goes with critical thinking skills, and those are the things you will learn to integrate into the critical thinking skills you already have.

luv4nursing

Has 5 years experience. Specializes in Med/Surg, Tele, Peds, LDRP.

You mean when you have to improvise? That goes with critical thinking skills, and those are the things you will learn to integrate into the critical thinking skills you already have.

yep thats what I mean :)

I think that being an LPN first can most certainly help with your clinicals. It has given me alot of confidence that way. Just be prepared to just become another student and be treated as though you have never been a nurse before. I never tell my preceptors on the clinical floor that I am an LPN, I just listen quietly and do as they say. When I go to perform a task they say oh my you learn fast. I just say well your a wonderfull preceptor at your young age of 23. I am 34 years old with a family, sometimes life teaches those of us whom are older a few things you just can't learn in a book. I watched as a young nurse was trying to help a new mom with breastfeading techniques, what a mess, I said I could share a few tips if she would like. I showed the new mom what I thought would work and it did. The nurse said how did you know that, you just started Maternal Child classes in school, I said I have 2 children, I felt like saying it's a no brainer but held my tongue. Also comparing my LPN clinicals to my RN clinicals, I would say most certainly that my LPN clinicals were much stronger. When we became IV certified in LPN school we practiced on each other, now they practice on dumies, big difference. We had to have 20 good sticks before we could do it clinically. There are students in my Rn class who have never stuck a human, only a dummie. No wonder they get out of RN school and require so much help from us little LPNs on the floor. I got long winded here, but I would say for sure my LPN schooling is an awesome foundation. I am glad I did it this way.

NurseMatt

Has 8 years experience.

Well I am starting my LPN Program next year sometime and it's the only way I cant think to do it to be prepare myself for it. 28 yrs old and going back to school from a long break. Plus think of all the experience you'll get.

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