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Has anybody else switched from an RN job to a CNA job?

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Have you considered Home Health? I hated the hospital, but love going to see people for infusions in their home. Also research? You will find your way. Blessings.

On 9/20/2020 at 4:45 PM, Rose_Queen said:

Please be cautious with the CNA route. I've heard (not personally verified) that some states prohibit working below your licensure level. In states that do allow the practice, the BON is going to hold you to the level of your licensure. That can put you between the proverbial rock and hard place based on the fact that you are an RN but are working a position that doesn't allow that scope.

If she allows her license to lapse that isn’t necessarily true.  She would be held to the standards of her CNA position.  As long as she upholds the requirements that a CNA is expected to do, she  can’t legally be held accountable to do what the RN role requires (ie. calling a physician in place of the RN if something is wrong, adverse events, documenting like an RN should, etc.).  At best she should cover herself noting if she did have to  “inform” the RN of any adverse changes, etc.  But she doesn’t have to perform the RN role.  If she actually wants out of nursing that’s her right.  Just ensure you let your license lapse.

Edited by MInurse2b

Hoosier_RN, MSN

Specializes in dialysis. Has 28 years experience.

13 hours ago, MInurse2b said:

If she allows her license to lapse that isn’t necessarily true.  She would be held to the standards of her CNA position.  As long as she upholds the requirements that a CNA is expected to do, she  can’t legally be held accountable to do what the RN role requires (ie. calling a physician in place of the RN if something is wrong, adverse events, documenting like an RN should, etc.).  At best she should cover herself noting if she did have to  “inform” the RN of any adverse changes, etc.  But she doesn’t have to perform the RN role.  If she actually wants out of nursing that’s her right.  Just ensure you let your license lapse.

If the license lapses, you (general you, not specific you) are no longer a RN, so that is correct, you can't be held to that standard. If you have that licensure, you can definitely be held to RN standard whether you are performing that role or not in a medical/nursing care setting. No one is saying she has no right to stop being a nurse. We're just noting things to be aware of if she keeps a job in a medical setting

Edited by Hoosier_RN

6 minutes ago, Hoosier_RN said:

If the license lapses, you (general you, not specific you) are no longer a RN, so that is correct, you can't be held to that standard. If you have that licensure, you can definitely be held to RN standard whether you are performing that role or not in a medical/nursing care setting. No one is saying she has no right to stop being a nurse. We're just noting things to be aware of if she keeps a job in a medical setting

And I was doing the same.  True, she should be cautious.  I was just adding to what she said.  As for some ppl not saying she has no right to stop being a nurse, it seems there are a few ppl  judging her decision.  Nursing like anything else isn’t necessarily for everyone.  Yeah she’s choosing a way lower paying job, and honestly some of us probably can’t understand why given all of the different types of nursing opportunities out there.   But hey, maybe she’s got it made monetarily and doesn’t need nursing for the money.  Either way, nothing beats having a peace of mind, not having the same pressure about malpractice hanging over your head, and feeling happy and content about your career choice.

Closed Account 12345

Has 16 years experience.

Please don't go the CNA route if you feel like it is "Socially acceptable for them to dump whatever to nurses."

No one in healthcare should think "dumping" on others is acceptable, whether RN to CNA, CNA to RN, and so on. Yes, it happens, but that doesn't mean it's right. The focus should be working as a team to give patients the best care. Each individual, regardless of role, should take pride in the quality of their work and their contributions.

If you really want to let your license go and leave the field of nursing, I think that's perfectly acceptable. Nursing isn't for everyone. However, you've mentioned feeling "stuck," "burned out," and "PTSD." Please don't make a big, life-altering decision like surrendering your license when you're mentally in a rough place. The best decisions are made with careful consideration when we're mentally at our best. Perhaps taking a break from employment in the healthcare setting, while maintaining your license, would give you time to take care of yourself, seek help and guidance, and just get to a better place in general. 

Since you're considering jobs as a CNA or doing a healthcare facility's laundry, I'm assuming you aren't 100% opposed to health-related jobs.  Have you considered something like medical coding and billing?  You could obtain these certificates within a few months, and at least in the US, the pay is higher than CNA and laundry positions.  This field offers a lot of remote, work from home opportunities, and it requires minimal human interaction.  

Miss.Jersey, MSN, APN

Specializes in PMHNP.

I would explore other avenues of nursing, based on your likes and dislikes. One to home home health with babies or seniors, you can have one patient all day.

There are a number of positions that can offer more autonomy, one to one or one at a time patient care, non-direct patient care, even MDS coordinator, insurance company work, school nurse. Without knowing your particular preferences it's hard to suggest possible options. What are your likes/dislikes?

hppygr8ful, ASN, RN, EMT-I

Specializes in Psych, Addictions, SOL (Student of Life). Has 19 years experience.

Why would you ever go backward? There are plenty of ways you can use your nursing license if you are misierable where you are!" I am doing  alot of writing latley with the goal of starting to get published in the fiction genre. I am also considering putting together a Pod Cast dealing with psych issues families face as their children grow into adulthood. 

Your thinking that somehow CNAs work less and dump more on nurses seems scewed. Next to nurses CNAs are ther hardest working people I know. They get many patients (Up to 20 in SNF) and do the heavyest lifting. 

I am always greatful for good CNAs as they do make my job easier. In my facility  they aren's CNAs and they don't need to be state certified but they are called Behavioral Health Specialists (BHS) and they make or break my shift as they function as my eyes and ears. I have been with the facility a long time and have reached the point where I can often pick my core team ( A reason I don't leave). 

Have you considered Coding or Nurse Informatics. If you are Master's prepared cosider leagal nurse consulting........

Anyway if your decision is already made I would rather go be a Greater at Walmart for minimim wage than a CNA for the same money. 

Hppy

dragonheart, MSN

Specializes in Nurse Consultation. Has 47 years experience.

In accordance with the Nurse Practice Act, you cannot perform duties below your level current licensure.

If you no longer hold an active nursing license then you can seek employment as a CNA.

There are some previous RNs who are currently working as CNA/CMT 

JadedCPN, BSN, RN

Specializes in Pediatrics, Pediatric Float, PICU, NICU. Has 15 years experience.

11 minutes ago, dragonheart said:

In accordance with the Nurse Practice Act, you cannot perform duties below your level current licensure.

If you no longer hold an active nursing license then you can seek employment as a CNA.

There are some previous RNs who are currently working as CNA/CMT 

Surely this bolded part can't be correct, as everything "below" an RN's current licensure level still falls within our scope of practice, I.e. changing diapers, hygiene ADLs, etc.

Curious1alwys, BSN, RN

Has 9 years experience.

On 9/24/2020 at 3:36 PM, hazyblue said:

Actually, ending up in long term care was the result of my attempt to leave hemodialysis which I absolutely...well not absolutely really... hated.

I feel like I've already wasted enough time trying to find the field for me in nursing... at this point, I'm just hating on it.

... I forgot what other thing I was going to reply to because I'm starting to have some sort of ptsd now.

(ETA: Excuse, the use of ptsd but I'm not in the best place to think of words at the moment.)

Awww, I'm so sorry you are feeling this way. How are you doing these days? 

Nummber Onne, ASN

Specializes in Mental Health. Has 26 years experience.

You can inactivate your license, but if you plan to reactivate it you will have to take refresher courses.  Did you consider phlebotomy or dialysis technician?  Mental health technician can be o.k., but not in a state hospital.

Kitiger, RN

Specializes in Private Duty Pediatrics. Has 42 years experience.

On 9/28/2020 at 3:20 PM, JadedCPN said:

Surely this bolded part can't be correct, as everything "below" an RN's current licensure level still falls within our scope of practice, I.e. changing diapers, hygiene ADLs, etc.

On 9/28/2020 at 3:08 PM, dragonheart said:

In accordance with the Nurse Practice Act, you cannot perform duties below your level current licensure.

 

All of it falls within the nurses scope of practice. That's the point. You will be judged as a nurse, expected to give the level of care that a nurse is capable of giving, but you will not be allowed to do those things as a nurse.