Jump to content

Has anybody else switched from an RN job to a CNA job?

Posted

I feel crazy for thinking this and feel the need to look for other peole with the same thinking. I'm done with nursing ages ago but it's the only field I have skills in so I stuck with it. I know that there's always the option to switch fields within nursing but that's easier said than done. I'm just tired of the demand to be a robot/saint on a field that I couldn't care less about anymore. I just want to save some money and pursue an engineering field. I've taught about doing nursing assistant work because they have less people to deal with and it feels more socially acceptable for them to dump whatever to nurses. I'm also considering being a cleaning staff and the like. I just can't be a robot anymore.

Rose_Queen, BSN, MSN, RN

Specializes in OR, education. Has 16 years experience.

Please be cautious with the CNA route. I've heard (not personally verified) that some states prohibit working below your licensure level. In states that do allow the practice, the BON is going to hold you to the level of your licensure. That can put you between the proverbial rock and hard place based on the fact that you are an RN but are working a position that doesn't allow that scope.

So you want RN accountability for CNA pay? Full time? Check with your malpractice insurance carrier to see if they will insure you for this situation.  I have only heard of RNs, or LVNs for that matter, that work a second job as a CNA or temporarily as a CNA until they get a licensed nurse job. 

Jedrnurse, BSN, RN

Specializes in school nurse. Has 29 years experience.

3 hours ago, caliotter3 said:

So you want RN accountability for CNA pay? Full time? Check with your malpractice insurance carrier to see if they will insure you for this situation.  I have only heard of RNs, or LVNs for that matter, that work a second job as a CNA or temporarily as a CNA until they get a licensed nurse job. 

I imagine the OP could let their license expire and avoid that pitfall. (If they're truly getting out of nursing.) I'm not sure whether you have to wait until renewal time to do it though...

I think if you don’t wait to renewal time you must surrender the license to inactivate it. However, this being the case, in CA, s/he must then obtain a CNA certificate. CA did away with the CNA certifications of those who obtained nursing licenses in 1994.

Jedrnurse, BSN, RN

Specializes in school nurse. Has 29 years experience.

3 hours ago, caliotter3 said:

I think if you don’t wait to renewal time you must surrender the license to inactivate it. However, this being the case, in CA, s/he must then obtain a CNA certificate. CA did away with the CNA certifications of those who obtained nursing licenses in 1994.

I wonder if  you could challenge the CNA exam or if  you'd have to sit in on the class. 

THAT could be interesting...

Don't know of anyone who has challenged the CNA exam in CA since this turnabout almost three decades ago.  I do know that it causes some level of consternation for those desperately seeking employment.  I applied for a CNA position in a hospital one time using my nursing license and the online process took about an hour or so to send me a rejection email because I was "not qualified".  Well, it wasn't my fault the state of CA took away my CNA certificate!  Moral of the story:  I did not get a job and the state of CA saved a tremendous amount of money in the adminstrative costs of maintaining my CNA certification.

Been there,done that, ASN, RN

Has 33 years experience.

On 9/19/2020 at 1:43 PM, hazyblue said:

I feel crazy for thinking this 

Not crazy.. it's maximum burnout. I was there. Thoughts of doing waitressing, housekeeping ... ANYWHERE but nursing. Going to the CNA role will not help your burnout. You would be in the same setting, seeing the same patients, working harder .. not smarter.  Can you see yourself taking direction from an R.N. to " go clean up Mr. Code Brown for half the salary?

What field of nursing are you currently in? It certainly is  hard to switch to a different area.  What have you done towards that goal?

 

Thank you for the reply people. I was planning doing nursing assistant work in some northern Canada province.... Yes, I am burned out. I am currently in Long Term Care.

8 hours ago, Been there,done that said:

It certainly is  hard to switch to a different area.  What have you done towards that goal?

All I have done so far is save some money.

Been there,done that, ASN, RN

Has 33 years experience.

I meant... what have you done to move towards a different area of nursing. There are many areas you can move to, using your licensure. 

I scoured the job boards, for anything and everything I was qualified for. I ended up with a work from home job.. that had better benefits and paid more money. If I could do it, you can too.

Making a good move ..takes some planning and a lot of effort.  Get going girl.

You will be held to RN standards of care as long as you posess a valid nursing license.

speedynurse, ADN, RN, EMT-P

Specializes in ER, Pre-Op, PACU.

Have you thought of just changing to another nursing speciality? I know for about a year I thought at one point that I hated nursing....now I am in a different speciality and actually really love and look forward to going to my job. I would recommend trying a different area of nursing first.

Just want to say being an RN gives you valuable skills that can be used in many other careers such as management, people skills, there are lots of things you can do.

Why don't you be a CNA instructor? Then you can be a RN and at the same time teach student CNAs, you can give them the RN perspective too.

On 9/23/2020 at 5:52 AM, Been there,done that said:

I meant... what have you done to move towards a different area of nursing. There are many areas you can move to, using your licensure.

Actually, ending up in long term care was the result of my attempt to leave hemodialysis which I absolutely...well not absolutely really... hated.

I feel like I've already wasted enough time trying to find the field for me in nursing... at this point, I'm just hating on it.

... I forgot what other thing I was going to reply to because I'm starting to have some sort of ptsd now.

(ETA: Excuse, the use of ptsd but I'm not in the best place to think of words at the moment.)

Edited by hazyblue
ETA

Sour Lemon

Has 9 years experience.

On 9/19/2020 at 10:43 AM, hazyblue said:

 I've taught about doing nursing assistant work because they have less people to deal with and it feels more socially acceptable for them to dump whatever to nurses. I'm also considering being a cleaning staff and the like. I just can't be a robot anymore.

Have you ever worked as "the CNA"? I do on occasion, usually when I have a preceptee near the end of their orientation.

The "dumping" goes both ways. CNAs pass things to us, but we also pass quite a few things to them. I feel like a reality check would cure you of this newfound desire. Neither job is a bed of roses, but one pays significantly more. I do appreciate the break in complete nursing duties ...but again, nursing pays more and I'm still being paid my nursing wages.

My third nursing job is by far the very best I have had. I still have to work, but under much better conditions than I ever dreamed were possible. There's still hope, in other words.

NurseSpeedy, ADN, LPN, RN

Has 19 years experience.

On 9/21/2020 at 8:18 AM, Jedrnurse said:

I imagine the OP could let their license expire and avoid that pitfall. (If they're truly getting out of nursing.) I'm not sure whether you have to wait until renewal time to do it though...

I wonder if going “inactive” with the license would be an option? This way it’s always a fall back (some things apply to reactivate after a certain time-at least one my state). I have both my LPN and RN. My LPN I renew each year under inactive status after I got my RN. I just figure some jobs may be looking for one over the other (and some won’t consider an RN because they don’t feel they can “afford” them). I have worked with some retired nurses that became CNAs years ago so they would have the income but not the stress level of their licensed nursing profession. Granted, this was close to 20 years ago and if I was in a situation where the stress got to been too much but still needed at least some paycheck, I could see why. The profession can chew you up and spit you out so many times over that you start to no recognize yourself or when you finally realize how much it’s changed you there’s a lot of personal repair needed after the damage is done.

Nursing is a very rewarding profession but that reward carries a lot of weight with it sometimes and stress can be too much after a while. 

martymoose, BSN, RN

Specializes in PCCN. Has 18 years experience.

Im considering being a local driver for pepsi or some other product, or even amazon or fed ex.Considering.

its a shame , such a waste of time and money , and kinda lied to and not wanting to believe it , all this time . No wonder you have stress

but I don't thing being a CNA is any better . Shoot, you work your way up to an assistant manager in a store , etc for the same amt of money while in engineering school. CNA is going to have more whiney patients , not less .