Jump to content

Has anybody else switched from an RN job to a CNA job?

Posted

You are reading page 2 of Has anybody else switched from an RN job to a CNA job?. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

Just want to say being an RN gives you valuable skills that can be used in many other careers such as management, people skills, there are lots of things you can do.

Why don't you be a CNA instructor? Then you can be a RN and at the same time teach student CNAs, you can give them the RN perspective too.

On 9/23/2020 at 5:52 AM, Been there,done that said:

I meant... what have you done to move towards a different area of nursing. There are many areas you can move to, using your licensure.

Actually, ending up in long term care was the result of my attempt to leave hemodialysis which I absolutely...well not absolutely really... hated.

I feel like I've already wasted enough time trying to find the field for me in nursing... at this point, I'm just hating on it.

... I forgot what other thing I was going to reply to because I'm starting to have some sort of ptsd now.

(ETA: Excuse, the use of ptsd but I'm not in the best place to think of words at the moment.)

Edited by hazyblue
ETA

Sour Lemon

Has 11 years experience.

On 9/19/2020 at 10:43 AM, hazyblue said:

 I've taught about doing nursing assistant work because they have less people to deal with and it feels more socially acceptable for them to dump whatever to nurses. I'm also considering being a cleaning staff and the like. I just can't be a robot anymore.

Have you ever worked as "the CNA"? I do on occasion, usually when I have a preceptee near the end of their orientation.

The "dumping" goes both ways. CNAs pass things to us, but we also pass quite a few things to them. I feel like a reality check would cure you of this newfound desire. Neither job is a bed of roses, but one pays significantly more. I do appreciate the break in complete nursing duties ...but again, nursing pays more and I'm still being paid my nursing wages.

My third nursing job is by far the very best I have had. I still have to work, but under much better conditions than I ever dreamed were possible. There's still hope, in other words.

NurseSpeedy, ADN, LPN, RN

Has 19 years experience.

On 9/21/2020 at 8:18 AM, Jedrnurse said:

I imagine the OP could let their license expire and avoid that pitfall. (If they're truly getting out of nursing.) I'm not sure whether you have to wait until renewal time to do it though...

I wonder if going “inactive” with the license would be an option? This way it’s always a fall back (some things apply to reactivate after a certain time-at least one my state). I have both my LPN and RN. My LPN I renew each year under inactive status after I got my RN. I just figure some jobs may be looking for one over the other (and some won’t consider an RN because they don’t feel they can “afford” them). I have worked with some retired nurses that became CNAs years ago so they would have the income but not the stress level of their licensed nursing profession. Granted, this was close to 20 years ago and if I was in a situation where the stress got to been too much but still needed at least some paycheck, I could see why. The profession can chew you up and spit you out so many times over that you start to no recognize yourself or when you finally realize how much it’s changed you there’s a lot of personal repair needed after the damage is done.

Nursing is a very rewarding profession but that reward carries a lot of weight with it sometimes and stress can be too much after a while. 

martymoose, BSN, RN

Specializes in PCCN. Has 18 years experience.

Im considering being a local driver for pepsi or some other product, or even amazon or fed ex.Considering.

its a shame , such a waste of time and money , and kinda lied to and not wanting to believe it , all this time . No wonder you have stress

but I don't thing being a CNA is any better . Shoot, you work your way up to an assistant manager in a store , etc for the same amt of money while in engineering school. CNA is going to have more whiney patients , not less .

Been there,done that, ASN, RN

Has 33 years experience.

11 hours ago, hazyblue said:

Actually, ending up in long term care was the result of my attempt to leave hemodialysis which I absolutely...well not absolutely really... hated.

I feel like I've already wasted enough time trying to find the field for me in nursing... at this point, I'm just hating on it.

... I forgot what other thing I was going to reply to because I'm starting to have some sort of ptsd now.

(ETA: Excuse, the use of ptsd but I'm not in the best place to think of words at the moment.)

So many more options than LTC or hemodialysis. You are not able to focus  right  now.  Time for professional counseling . 

Best wishes.

rubynrse, ADN, RN

Specializes in Hospice, Geriatrics. Has 40 years experience.

I have thought about this also.  There were times when I was just so tired of being responsible.  Tired of being given jobs without the right tools and then chastised for not getting it done.  I don't think I'd go so far as being a CNA, bless their hearts they work their fingers to the bone.  I could never do what they do.  I have thought of being a unit secretary or something along that line.  Not leaving medicine entirely, just the part about being stuck between a rock and a hard place.  

martymoose, BSN, RN

Specializes in PCCN. Has 18 years experience.

Do any of you worry about the loss of money and not being able to pay the bills if you make a change ?

Hoosier_RN, MSN

Specializes in dialysis. Has 28 years experience.

If you have licensure as an RN, regardless of title working as, you are held to the accountability of RN. Job title downgrade doesn't absolve you of the responsibility, sadly.  Many posts on AN regarding this

rubynrse, ADN, RN

Specializes in Hospice, Geriatrics. Has 40 years experience.

I understand that.  Not sure what accountability would be held against me while working behind the desk.  I guess the ground rules would have to be set ahead of time assuming they would hire an RN for that position.  For example I would ask to not respond to codes, start emergency IVs, etc.  

Hoosier_RN, MSN

Specializes in dialysis. Has 28 years experience.

6 minutes ago, rubynrse said:

I understand that.  Not sure what accountability would be held against me while working behind the desk.  I guess the ground rules would have to be set ahead of time assuming they would hire an RN for that position.  For example I would ask to not respond to codes, start emergency IVs, etc.  

no, but if something goes sideways, and you are present, your state BON, as well as legal entities can make you accountable by stating that you should have been another set of eyes and ears. Especially in a lawsuit situation. No employer can make any provisions for that, even in writing. I've seen it in action

As far as a code, most would still require that you act as a prudent nurse, and you may not be able to skate from that, don't know, state laws may vary. IVs you could probably finagle

Edited by Hoosier_RN