Why Do Nurses Eat Their Own? - page 2

This is my own personal experience as to why nurses eat their own? I have been in nursing for 20+ years. I've watched a lot of nurses come and go and some trying to move up that corporate food chain... Read More

  1. by   LadyFree28
    Quote from Altra
    Professional nurses take at least introductory-level college courses in psychology, sociology, and human development ... and have presumably functioned in group settings (family/school/work/etc) before becoming nurses. But some appear completely dumbfounded by the realities of typical adult interpersonal relations, including power games.

    I have never understood this.


    Me thinks some don't pay attention in those classes, nor they don't pay attention in Mental Health; that education ALONE has helped me master challenging personalities.
  2. by   Altra
    Quote from Janey496
    ....who exactly decides which posts should be listed as "featured nurse topics"? What would merit this as being a "featured" part of this site?

    Not to discount OPs experience for what it was, but it isn't a unique post. It is just yet another anecdotal post about interpersonal conflict. This is a feature? I guess I don't get it.
    Thank you for this. And if decisions are made to "feature" posts to draw in readers, you would think that particular care would be taken with spelling & grammar of the post.
  3. by   Julius Seizure
    Quote from Altra
    Thank you for this. And if decisions are made to "feature" posts to draw in readers, you would think that particular care would be taken with spelling & grammar of the post.
    In general, that they would "put our best foot forward", so to speak.
  4. by   kbrn2002
    The title of the post aside, I can see OP's point. It is more than frustrating to train a new nurse, be all nice and welcoming to the new nurse and have that person stab you in the back and then climb over it down the road. Makes you kind of regret being so nice to that person when they were the new nurse doesn't it?
  5. by   imenid37
    Because... there are a lot of people out there who are mean and self focused. It isn't confined to nursing. It is in all sorts of other professions. Women may be sniping and personalize their digs into other women, but men also undermine each other at work. It is a sad and unfortunate fact of life. Many people are very insecure. They assume that if you are doing well or not doing well it is a threat or opportunity to them. Everything is a competition to some people. If you are new and weak they can put you down and show you who how superior they are or if you are doing well, they must tear you down to maintain their status. If something is wrong, it is never their fault. You cannot control others or put them in a time machine back to age 3 or 4 to alter their life experience. You can control how YOU react to others. YOU can control how you respond to others. Truly I try to get along with everyone. For the sake of patients, I do reach out to help others. I have found that some people are worth my time and effort to sincerely help. Others are just not nice people and I do not get deeply involved with them. You have to use common sense and not get to personal or share too much with people who are not nice. Don't let others drag you down. It is a hard lesson to learn, but very worthwhile.
  6. by   amzyRN
    "No one can make you feel inferior without your consent" Elinor Rosevelt.

    Nursing is a very challenging and worthy profession and if you are to survive, you will "grow a backbone". take each experience as a learning opportunity; not every person will hold your hand. This is true in everyday life too. If you are in a toxic environment, either move on or learn to stand up for yourself and you will see things change.
  7. by   nursel56
    I guess my problem with the headline situation is that I feel, they contain false premises most often leading to a rousing, rancorous nurse-on-nurse throwdown. We had the "do BSN's save lives?" headline and the "you've been lied to" headline which I would put in that category. I'm sorry, but it really bothers me. Maybe I should voice this someplace else on the site, but there you have it nevertheless.

    nrsgofold-- seems you've had a string of jobs not working out, the jockeying for position and betrayals just suck no matter what you call it.

    Hope you finally find an employer who values your experience and teaching talents.
    Last edit by nursel56 on Apr 19, '16 : Reason: add another comment
  8. by   Been there,done that
    Florence would like me!
    There is the occasional nurse that is so frustrated with their situation, that they take it out on the kids. Most of the oldy moldys just want to mentor and guide.
  9. by   elkpark
    Do you think there are online discussion boards for other occupations that are full of threads about "Why do realtors eat their own?", "Why do secretaries eat their own?", "Why do personal trainers eat their own?", "Why do advertising executives eat their own?", etc., etc., etc.? Or is this just confined to nursing? (I mean the preoccupation with whether or not you've been mistreated by a colleague, not the actual phenomenon, which, as we should all know, is by no means a special feature of nursing.)
  10. by   Steffy44
    This is not unique to nursing. Saw the same people for the 25 years I was in the Air Force. What is scary is that hospital leadership is so willing to let a cheaper, inexperienced hire be involved with who stays and goes. I've only been a nurses for a year. I don't have the experience to make those kinds of decisions.
  11. by   mindlor
    Replies like this highlight the ops point....mean spirited and nasty....and reading on through many nasty posts continue....why even bother to reply with a snarky negative post....wait I know.....you are nurses....attempting to make yourselves look like you are all that while trying to minimize the credibility of the OP....Unreal
  12. by   emtb2rn
    As many folks have already said, this is not relegated to nursing. Try moving up through the management ranks in the corporate world. There's a technique called "the velvet knife" in which you undermine a colleague with what appears to be a compliment - "i can't believe john makes it into the office on time every day with the amount he drinks."
  13. by   Hollybobs
    Quote from mindlor
    Replies like this highlight the ops point....mean spirited and nasty....and reading on through many nasty posts continue....why even bother to reply with a snarky negative post....wait I know.....you are nurses....attempting to make yourselves look like you are all that while trying to minimize the credibility of the OP....Unreal
    How can you read the replies and see mean-spirited, nasty negativity? Read them again... we have an explanation that older nurses like to mentor and guide, empathy and wishes for more positive experiences in future, explanations of why people can be mean in the workplace and how to deal with it. There is sympathy about how it "can suck" and advice about being more assertive and that is just page 2.

    I also agree that effort should be put into spelling and grammar out of respect for readers, that much more back-stabbing and meanness is found in other professions and that overall there are no kinder and more helpful colleagues than in nursing. Like the OP, you see what you look for sometimes.

    Also, Florence was a pretty tough old bird by all accounts and could be quite critical of other women- she is sometimes inaccurately cited as some sort of rosy-cheeked, angel-winged symbol of fluffiness and hand-holding.

    And "underling"? No-one is an underling.

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