Over saturated health careers

  1. So I have been doing resesrch and I'm noticing a trend of over saturation in some healthcare careers. The problem lies with the schools and how many they allow into their programs AND the trend for new 2 year or community colleges graduating more students than there are jobs (yearly!!) or the fact that many come from other countries wanting a healthcare career. Some grads have to take low paid jobs/ part time or even worse... Wait years to even find a job!
    so what is the best career option for a new student now in 2017? If there's a career not likely to be over saturated or a trend towards the better please reply with your info...

    the careers with those complaints are:

    UltraSound(sonography)
    radiation technitions
    Physical therapist
    PTAssistant
    Occupational therapy
    OTAssistant
    pharmacist
    dental hygienist (using dental techs to clean for cheaper)

    is nursing saturated or becoming saturated?
    Am I wrong in my research???
    I'm at a loss for what I should enter in to...
    Does anyone have any advice for a person starting a college career in heal are and what career is the safest option for job security and least in saturation?

    (On on another note, I'm hearing similar things from paralegals, graphic/web design and anyone in the liberal arts field other than teachers)
  2. Visit Passingtime profile page

    About Passingtime

    Joined: Sep '16; Posts: 4

    12 Comments

  3. by   CardiacDork
    Fine arts/Liberal arts are out of the question in my opinion. My friend a barista at Starbucks that has a masters degree, I make three times what he makes and I have a little ole ADN.

    I think nursing is a safe option. It depends where you live also. Jobs are hard to come by in California and heavily populated popular cities for new grads.

    Meaning you may have to settle for working for a suburban or rural hospital for a year or two and obtaining your BSN before you can work at the top level 1 trauma centers in NY, Boston, and California.

    Although I landed an ICU job at a level one trauma center in a city in Texas --- so it's possible! I have an ADN
  4. by   JustBeachyNurse
    Nursing has been saturated in much of the country for years.

    PT & OT seem very happy especially if outpatient or school based PT is doctorate and OT is masters

    pharmacist it depends retail? Specialty? Rounding therapeutic pharmacologist? Hospital based? Research? Clinical or contract research? Drug discovery? Entry to practice is a doctoral degree
  5. by   applewhitern
    Yes, when talk started about the impending nursing shortage, everybody jumped on the bandwagon and went to nursing school. More schools opened, thus graduating tons of new nurses each year. Add in the proliferation of online programs where you can get most of your pre-reqs and some nursing courses out of the way quickly. I have recently read a few articles stating that there will actually be a SURPLUS of nurses, rather than a shortage, in a few years. Keep in mind that we need jobs here in the United States, period, and not just in the healthcare field. Go ahead and be taking basic college core classes; many of them are going to be the same for most degrees, anyway.
  6. by   dawniepoo
    I know job availability is an important factor in deciding, but even more importantly, please make sure you like the profession you pick. It makes for a bumpy road otherwise.
  7. by   Libby1987
    We talk all of the time about the job market in California being glutted but I've had several conversations with different case mgrs/case mgmt directors just this week re their difficulty transferring patients to lower levels of care due to lack of nursing staff.

    There are are positions that need to be filled but they aren't the popular ones.
  8. by   Everline
    Someone was telling me the other day that there is a need for medical technologists. Not everyone is cut out for working in a lab all the time and I have no idea about advancement and other particulars.
  9. by   ReOxyS
    Depends on the area of the country you're looking at. I've heard some people insist that there's a shortage and it will get worse, I've heard others insist that there's absolutely no shortage and in fact there is a surplus of nurses. But the fact of the matter is that I and the rest of my cohort (and indeed those who came before us) had absolutely no difficulty securing positions. I had a job lined up the spring break before graduation. I'm in Texas.
  10. by   dirtyhippiegirl
    I graduated at the tail end of the recession, nursing jobs were scarce. You had a hundred new grads competing for five or ten openings. Same area, now the big hospitals are advertising on TV and radio, open houses galore welcoming both experienced nurses and new grads. Of course the FNP market is now saturated...
  11. by   VivaLasViejas
    My son hasn't even taken his NCLEX-PN yet and he's already got his first job lined up. So yes, there are jobs out there if you're willing to work "less desirable" jobs like those in long-term care.
  12. by   NurseCard
    Quote from Passingtime
    So I have been doing resesrch and I'm noticing a trend of over saturation in some healthcare careers. The problem lies with the schools and how many they allow into their programs AND the trend for new 2 year or community colleges graduating more students than there are jobs (yearly!!) or the fact that many come from other countries wanting a healthcare career. Some grads have to take low paid jobs/ part time or even worse... Wait years to even find a job!
    so what is the best career option for a new student now in 2017? If there's a career not likely to be over saturated or a trend towards the better please reply with your info...

    the careers with those complaints are:

    UltraSound(sonography)
    radiation technitions
    Physical therapist
    PTAssistant
    Occupational therapy
    OTAssistant
    pharmacist
    dental hygienist (using dental techs to clean for cheaper)

    is nursing saturated or becoming saturated?
    Am I wrong in my research???
    I'm at a loss for what I should enter in to...
    Does anyone have any advice for a person starting a college career in heal are and what career is the safest option for job security and least in saturation?

    (On on another note, I'm hearing similar things from paralegals, graphic/web design and anyone in the liberal arts field other than teachers)
    Wow... when has graphic design/web design NOT been an over-saturated field? My first degree was actually in visual art/graphic design.. and I was lucky to get a job after a year and a half of searching. Then when I did get a job, it was low paying, very far away from my house, and was just a crappy job overall. Soon after that experience, was when I decided to go back to school for nursing.

    I think the nursing market may have been over-saturated a couple of years ago, but at least in my area, I'm seeing a HUGE need for nurses. I think nursing remains a safe area to go into.
  13. by   xoemmylouox
    For nursing it really just depends on the area. Some areas are begging, others have 100+ applying for 5 job openings. Nursung does tend to have a lot of different career paths which is nice.
  14. by   AlmostANurse321
    Here's why nursing will never be over-saturated. It objectively sucks. You stand up for 12 hours. You're accountable to everyone, all the time. If a physician screws up and you don't catch it, then it's your fault for not catching it. If you catch it and inform the physician, you're going to get a new rectal orifice from Dr. Happy. You see more poop than the guy that cleans the elephant house at the zoo. You hold your pee so long that your bladder cramps. On your best day, half of your census is taking their frustrations out on you. You see a patient die and are expected to finish your shift without flinching.
    However you love it and wouldn't trade it for anything else in the world. There aren't many people who can say that.

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