Would you work during nursing school if you didn't have to? - page 4

I have two friends that I take classes with...all of us are entering the nursing program this Fall. The three of us are married and are fortunate to be in the position of having spouses where... Read More

  1. by   TheCommuter
    I did not work during my time in a 12-month LVN program. Rather, I lived off unemployment checks.

    I now work full-time weekend double shifts as an LVN on a rehab unit, and attend classes at my local community college full-time during the week. I enjoy this situation because I can earn good grades while earning a good income simultaneously. Last year I earned $47,000 during my first year as an LVN, and my overall GPA is a 3.85 after completing 28 credit hours worth of classes.
  2. by   RNDreamer
    IWorked pt then ft while getting my first degree in engineering...while it was exhausting, it was doable (is this even a word?) For NS, I don't plan to work ft, just pt...I'm hoping to get a position in a nursing home or hospital as a CNA, but if I don't I still have work study. However, not working is not an option for me right now because I have minor bills to pay.
  3. by   laura11
    i intend to continue working while attending nursing school this fall. It is going to be stressful but it is all about time management. I am also a stress reader, if I have some much time nothing gets done.
  4. by   jaylynn67
    I work 32 hours a week and i HATE it. I am exhausted all the time, i feel like a crazy person. I can't keep the days straight or my house clean. I would quit my job in a second if i could afford it. Only 7 more months until i graduate!!!
  5. by   SarasotaRN2b
    Would I? yes, in a heartbeat...unfortunately, I am my sole support. I currently work Fri/Sat/Sun 7p-7a...I would love to cut down to two days a week when I start nursing school, but I don't know if I'll be able to. I'm even thinking of renting a larger apartment so I can share expenses which will still be lower than my small one bedroom.

    The ironic thing is that nursing schools always recommend that you don't work, but who are they expecting to pay the bills? I personally think that they should have someone in the nursing program that is a scholarship coordinator. This way when students are accepted into the program, there is a resource for them.
  6. by   Multicollinearity
    My number one pet peeve in life is people who don't understand those different than themselves!

    Seriously, it ticks me off. When I read someone saying, "I worked full-time in school so you can, of course you can too..." I get all kinds of :angryfire because that may or may not be true for others. (Not directing this at anyone on this thread, btw.)

    Some people will do fine working while going to school -- others will not. We all have different situations, strengths, and weaknesses. If I were attending a program where I just had to get C's to get into nursing school...no consideration of GPA and grades, then the working considerations would be different.

    As it is, I work maybe 5 hours per week. So not very much at all. This semester I'm taking 17 credits, and last semester I took 19 credits. For me, because of my makeup and constitution, I do better focusing on a heavy class load rather than going more slowly and working more. I have a hard time maintaining a divided focus between school and work. Because of this, I'd rather take out big student loans and get through school this way.

    I think age is a consideration, too. Younger students are marvelous memorizers compared to older students. I have my questions about how much they understand of what they memorize so rapidly...but that's another topic. On average, raw, rote memorizing ability starts to dip around the mid-twenties; however, critical thinking skills begin to improve at about the same time.

    Anyway, I think we will all have different capacities, strengths, weaknesses, and solutions. If I had a magic wand, though, I'd rather see students work little and go through school with a relatively heavy course load and focus nearly exclusively on school.

    I think it's also important to take what we hear and read with a grain of salt. People are likely to talk about what a heavy load they have and how well they do. And they should be proud of htat. However, at the same time, people are unlikely to pipe up and share their failures about what they couldn't manage.
    Last edit by Multicollinearity on Oct 3, '07
  7. by   Multicollinearity
    Quote from TheCommuter
    I did not work during my time in a 12-month LVN program. Rather, I lived off unemployment checks.

    I now work full-time weekend double shifts as an LVN on a rehab unit, and attend classes at my local community college full-time during the week. I enjoy this situation because I can earn good grades while earning a good income simultaneously. Last year I earned $47,000 during my first year as an LVN, and my overall GPA is a 3.85 after completing 28 credit hours worth of classes.
    You have done so well! I hope you are proud of yourself.
  8. by   mturner88
    If I didn't have to I wouldn't but I have struggled through school. I had a job and then they let me go and said I quit. Unemployment was denied until the following year when it got reversed. I was homeless, sleeping in my car to finally finding a place to live but now my car is gone. I had to send my son with my mother (out of town) and now I have him back and I am doing everything I can to get through this. My dad has so much money but refuses to help me and its okay. I've done this all on my own and I've had many set backs. I was set to graduate this December but the BIG ATI on pharm is what held me back from graduating with my cohort and my leadership and internship was pushed back to January. I was hurt then but not anymore. I will finish and be happy that the sacrifices I made to be a nurse was worth every single tear I have cried. I just received a call last night for a job I applied for in June at Aurora and now they want me to come work in their Neurosurgical ICU, and things are now looking up for me.
    Last edit by mturner88 on Oct 6, '07
  9. by   neb4882
    Quote from mturner88
    If I didn't have to I wouldn't but I have struggled through school. I had a job and then they let me go and said I quit. Unemployment was denied until the following year when it got reversed. I was homeless, sleeping in my car to finally finding a place to live but now my car is gone. I had to send my son with my mother (out of town) and now I have him back and I am doing everything I can to get through this. My dad has so much money but refuses to help me and its okay. I've done this all on my own and I've had many set backs. I was set to graduate this December but the BIG ATI on pharm is what held me back from graduating with my cohort and my leadership and internship was pushed back to January. I was hurt then but not anymore. I will finish and be happy that the sacrifices I made to be a nurse was worth every single tear I have cried. I just received a call last night for a job I applied for in June at Aurora and now they want me to come work in their Neurosurgical ICU, and things are now looking up for me.
    Congratulations
  10. by   rnmomtobe2010
    Not a chance!
  11. by   mturner88
    Quote from neb4882
    Congratulations

    Thank you! I admit that I am extremely nervous because I find ICU to be overwhelming but I am ready for the challenge.
  12. by   law3576
    i have the option not to work while in school so i didn't. I will be graduating this coming June and I will start a PRN job as a PCT just so I can learn time management skills and become familiar in the hospital setting.
    I think that if you don't have to work then you shouldn't but maybe when you're getting close to graduating it's a good idea to pick up a little job in the hospital just to learn a couple skills. PRN is perfect because i only have to work 24 hours a month and it's whenever I want. I chose my shifts so I don't feel pressured to work and go to school.
  13. by   ChargeNurseAmy74
    no way would i try to work while in the program. it is way too much work to try to juggle and go home and care for the home, husband and my 3 children. i'd die. lol. best of luck to all of you who will do it though, i just couldn't imagine doing it.

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