Can a teacher do this? - page 7

by Dezy

8,548 Views | 114 Comments

Ok so I had a midterm yesterday. I have been studying for a little over two weeks straight for this example. I would go over the material she has posted online (she likes to do everything on power int) she also just does her... Read More


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    OP, I don't believe any of us was trying to be rude, mean, or unsympathetic when we posted. Being in nursing school (or in college, at all) is like being inducted into a big club. We've all been members of that club at one time or another and survived. When you've survived being a member of this club and become a nurse, you'll be
    in a brand new club -- the RN/LPN club where you're now legally responsible for your own mistakes.

    That's a great part of the reason your faculty seems so unyielding and unreasonable. They just can't afford to have you make lots of errors that could cost someone their life.

    You aren't reading all this stuff just to fulfill an assignment or as busy work. You really will need to know all this information when you're an actual nurse someday. As I mentioned i an earlier post, faculty simply doesn't have enough time to talk about everything in class. Most use class time to expand beyond the reading assignments, explain what is especially difficult, and do some question answering.

    All professors are required to have office hours. Use them! If they aren't convenient for you, most faculty will meet you outside those hours and in offbeat places like the student union, classrooms, etc. I know my husbandhas met students all kinds of unusual spots at times that worked for the student. Don't be afraid to ask.
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    Quote from britney705
    Be careful what you post on this site people are extremely negative and almost always think they are better and smarter than you...I suggest looking for advice elsewhere because people here most of the time never want to support you its pathetic to me. I've read so many threads on this site and its disgusting how some of the people respond. People get on here looking for advice and support from fellow nurses and students and basically everyone just tells you to suck it up and get over it. I understand that the nursing field is tough and constructive criticism is ok and definitely necessary but there is a way to say it. And everyone needs to remember that we all start from the same places and were once in each other shoes.
    I understand exactly what you're saying. And everytime a nursing student shares a situation, there is always that one nurse who implies those who haven't graduated or aren't in a nursing program don't know what they're talking about so their opinions/advice should barely be considered.

    The sad part is nurses are not that accurate/mistake-proof as much as a small bunch tries to seem to be. I'm living proof of that. I've had to be rushed in an ambulance from a gyno clinic due to a nurses simple mistake. So imagine how I take some of these snobby responses.

    Anyway, OP I really hope it all works out. I'm afraid what you're speaking of might happen to me. I've been tested on crap that wasnt outlined/discussed before so like others mentioned just pop open that book and go over the chapters x amount of times.
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    Hi.

    I'd like to start this post off with the disclaimer that I'm ONLY A PRE-REQ student at this time. I do have an Associates in another area however, and have sat through enough college level classes to feel comfortable posting on this particular article.

    Here it goes. Please take it for what it's worth.

    I noticed that the majority of the posters (and certainly the first posters) to this article immediately assumed that the OP is at fault simply because "It is YOUR responsibility to learn the material." Well, while this is technically true, it is also the instructors responsibility to guide you along the correct path of learning this material. And I don't believe that the Professor standing there reading a power point-and doing little else-covers this obligation. If a student is paying good money (or even little money, for that matter) for an education, then s/he damn well deserves more than a power point that is nothing more than what is read in the text book. Seriously, I've had Professors give power points that were VERBATIM from the text! If I wanted a refresher of the text, I could have just reread it myself. I don't care if this is standard practice. It is not enough. The Instructors should be giving REAL LIFE-FROM THEIR EXPERIENCE-examples of the info in the power points, to MAKE the info on them more than just something out of a book. To make the students understand that the importance of this information goes WAY BEYOND just passing some test!

    If some of the posters here are Professors/Instructors who teach this way then you should be ashamed of yourselves. You are cheating your students! It doesn't matter how high your class pass rates are, it surely isn't because of you. If they had to dissect their text in its entirety in their own time because of the lack of help you give them, I do not believe that you should feel any responsibility for their success. By the way, "Yes" they should be spending much of their own time doing this, but not only because they get no help from you. Keep in mind, I'm only referring to the Professors who do power points and nothing else. If this isn't you please do not be offended. If it is you, well, like the posters are saying to the OP, "Take this and learn from it."

    I would like to also touch on the statement that "It is YOUR responsibility to learn the material." I believe that students pay-very much in many cases-tuition and sit in classrooms (or pay tuition and go online ) as a way of carrying out the responsibility of learning the material. Once these students are accepted into a program and take on the attached financial obligation, then the institution takes on their own obligation-the obligation to prepare these students to not only pass the NCLEX, but to absorb and apply the knowledge that the curriculum (that they are paying to attend) is supposed to provide. Not just to regurgitate information from a text book in the form of a power point. I'm sorry but I don't care if this is the standard practice (nor am I claiming it IS the standard practice, but I gotta say I've seen it quite often in my own experiences), it is WRONG!

    Alluding to what a previous poster said (and I'm paraphrasing, here) about how we complain over a sub par hamburger that cost $2, why should it be wrong to speak up about an expensive education that we feel is falling short of expectations? I don't get that.

    Now, instead of attacking the OP instinctively, we should delve a bit deeper into her circumstances. I would like to know what the class average for the midterm was. If it were a passing average, but the poster did terribly then yes, maybe she is whining, has bad study habits or both. BUT, if on the average the class did poorly, then she is likely NOT whining. It really is that simple. It could go either way, but as a knee-jerk reaction the OP was immediately inundated with posts that solely put her at fault, with no one even considering that she may have actually had a poor instructor. That is NOT fair and impartial... Also, I believe many posters took it too literally when the OP says "She read a little of the text." Granted, she should have read the whole required reading, but by "Little" I'm sure it was not as little as I believe most posters are taking it for. I seriously doubt she stopped after a page or two

    I have one more small addition. For the posters who posted anything along the lines of "You're an adult now, ect, ect...," whether you meant it as such or not, you were insulting this girl. I know I would take it as an insult if someone accused me of being less than an adult without asking a single probing question first. Come on, guys (and ladies). Advice is always appreciated, but insults should not be rendered without substantial cause.
    Last edit by PRICHARILLAisMISSED on Nov 23, '12
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    I really do not understand why anyone feels that the OP has been "attacked." To answer her question, YES professors CAN give you 300+ pages of material to go over with no study guide and say it is all fair game, so read it and know it. That is what a syllabus is. Is it helpful? Not really. Do other professors do more to guide you? Heck yes. But it is not required. It is frustrating, and it can be confusing to get through if you have never had this kind of professor before. It is also debatable whether or not this type of professor is wrong in doing it. Either way, they CAN do it. You just have to adapt. It isn't fun, and it is a pain in the rear.

    I would suggest reading and outlining the chapters you have been given for an exam. Make your own study guide using the material in your syllabus. I find that to be a great way for me to cover my bases and retain what I'm reading. Incorporate your notes, any handouts you may have gotten in class, and any powerpoints the professor used. Also, if your school has tutors, USE them. They can guide you in studying what you need to know. Get together with a group of your classmates and study with them. You have to move past being upset that you are in this situation, and start taking action, using every resource at your disposal, and learning it on your own. You have to put a lot more time and effort into learning with this kind of professor. It doesn't seem fair, and it feels like you are being ripped off of what you are paying for, but it is allowed so all you can do is buckle down and make the best of it.
    Last edit by FDW630 on Nov 23, '12
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    When I took an Econ class for my previous accounting degree, I had a professor who would come in with this monotone voice and just talk. His teaching style didn't work for me and I got C's on every single test right up until the final exam. I scheduled an appointment to talk with him to see how I could bring my grade up and he was not helpful at all. In fact, I walked out of his office mad as he**. I was determined that he would not get the satisfaction of seeing me fail. I studied the entire book night and day until the final. Needless to say, I passed the class with an A. I understand your frustration. But now is the time to get determined and put in the work. Know the textbook so well that you can answer any question thrown at you with ease. Then it won't matter what's on the test. I think what most people are trying to tell you is that you have to move past what you feel your teacher didn't do right and work on what you can do on your end to kind of balance it out. If you know she's not going to tell you what to review, review everything. Make this class the priority and study the textbook every chance you get and anything you don't understand, you can ask her during class.Hope this helps! Good luck.
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    I think at least some of the persons to whom you refer are probably bullies/eat their young, at their jobs, so they can not understand what you are saying. Thank you for your post.
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    Quote from PRICHARILLAisMISSED
    Now, instead of attacking the OP instinctively, we should delve a bit deeper into her circumstances. I would like to know what the class average for the midterm was. If it were a passing average, but the poster did terribly then yes, maybe she is whining, has bad study habits or both. BUT, if on the average the class did poorly, then she is likely NOT whining.
    Theoretically, most classes perform on a normal curve. Some people will be on the high end, others will fail horribly, and the majority lie in the middle. But in other classes, this is not the case. You can't just blame the teacher or the test. In my pharmacology class this summer, the majority of people failed. Why?

    It was NOT my teacher's fault because she:

    1) Marked each drug we were to know with a "Key" symbol on the Powerpoints. This was reiterated throughout the course.

    2) Made the PowerPoints available to students online, with links to Youtube videos and relevant dosage calculation self-help sites.

    3) Told relevant stories about her experiences in nursing and how the drugs were used in different settings.

    4) Always reviewed A&P of whatever system before we talked about the drugs-- she wanted to make sure that we understood what was normal, what could go wrong, and how to fix it.

    5) We did case studies-- determining what drug would be relevant for what conditions.

    6) Reviewed the test questions after every exam and allowed us to contest unfair questions. She even generously dropped questions that a bunch of people missed.

    7) She provided us with study tools: she said to make drug cards, study the drugs by class, read the textbook well and understand that drugs can have side effects that are simply magnifications of the desired effects.

    8) Had frequent office hours, offering to help anyone who was struggling.

    9) WROTE FAIR TESTS. It was not as if she pulled the material out of nowhere. These drugs were in our textbook, highlighted as key drugs, and discussed at length. Example: "What is the most common side effect in patients taking nitroglycerin (Nitrostat)?" Answer: Headaches

    Is it really her fault that over half her class failed? She pretty did everything in her power, short of telling us the answers to the test. The day before the test, she had a special Powerpoint with hints and practice questions for the exam.

    So was it because students simply didn't get that pharmacology was a whole new ball game, where you couldn't just get by with cramming the night before? It's likely.
    Last edit by nguyency77 on Nov 23, '12
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    I apologize for the double post, but it irks me when people blame their teachers first without evaluating their own shortcomings.

    I have an A&P teacher who is very brilliant. He has a PhD in biology and spends his days contemplating the latest literature in his field. He wrote the A&P textbook we use in class, and he pretty much regurgitates his manuscript onto his PowerPoints, which he almost always reads verbatim. This is not always helpful, but sometimes I hear bits in his lecture that were not mentioned in the book. These bits of info sometimes clear the mind fog I experience when reading the text.

    This man enjoys failing students who don’t abide by “The Law of the Farm” (please read the article I’ve linked to at the bottom of the post), but he enjoys rewarding students who put in the work and go the extra mile to learn the material.

    I was determined not to give him the satisfaction of thinking, “This student is just like all the others—she doesn’t care if she learns the actual A&P. She just cares if she gets a C or better, so she can go on with the program. Sigh.” So I study my butt off, ask for help, surf the Web for resources, and go to office hours if I bomb a quiz. I did very well because I put in the work and correct my mistakes. I started off doing badly on the quizzes because I listened to hearsay about this teacher and blamed him for not preparing us well.

    @britney705—I don’t think that’s the case. The reason why I said what I did to the OP was to lend her realistic support from someone who has seen a hundred other would-be-RNs fail all their classes because they wouldn’t accept responsibility.

    I would hate to see the OP waste time blaming her teacher, when she could be using the time to study and absolutely destroy her next test. While all her classmates are whining about how it isn’t fair and that they aren’t responsible for failing, the OP could be getting A’s and be well on her way into a nursing program.

    OP: I suggest you read this article. It's pretty short.
    The Law of the Farm: Law of the Farm (S. Covey, 1994)
    Last edit by nguyency77 on Nov 23, '12 : Reason: Added something.
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    Quote from nguyency77
    I apologize for the double post, but it irks me when people blame their teachers first without evaluating their own shortcomings.

    I have an A&P teacher who is very brilliant. He has a PhD in biology and spends his days contemplating the latest literature in his field. He wrote the A&P textbook we use in class, and he pretty much regurgitates his manuscript onto his PowerPoints, which he almost always reads verbatim. This is not always helpful, but sometimes I hear bits in his lecture that were not mentioned in the book. These bits of info sometimes clear the mind fog I experience when reading the text.

    This man enjoys failing students who don’t abide by “The Law of the Farm” (please read the article I’ve linked to at the bottom of the post), but he enjoys rewarding students who put in the work and go the extra mile to learn the material.

    I was determined not to give him the satisfaction of thinking, “This student is just like all the others—she doesn’t care if she learns the actual A&P. She just cares if she gets a C or better, so she can go on with the program. Sigh.” So I study my butt off, ask for help, surf the Web for resources, and go to office hours if I bomb a quiz. I did very well because I put in the work and correct my mistakes. I started off doing badly on the quizzes because I listened to hearsay about this teacher and blamed him for not preparing us well.
    ^^ A thousand times this. Whether it's pre-reqs or nursing classes, some classes are just plain tough period. And not every teacher is going to tell you every. single. thing. on the test. Only so much can be discussed in one class period, that is why it is the student's responsibility to read their text, ask questions, study, and read the text some more.

    My psychology teacher is similar to the A&P teacher mentioned above. She has a Ph. D. in psychology and is just plain difficult. Passionate, and kind, but difficult. We started with 70 students, we're down to about 25, and half of those are failing. Half the students like her a little bit, the other half can't stand her. I LOVE her. She is passionate about what she teaches but let's face it, she can only teach so much in one class period. She goes over what'll be on the test, highlights the important facts, TELLS US TO READ THE BOOK and reviews before test day. And most of the class still bombs the exams. I have an A in the class and constantly get asked how am I passing the class. Simple. I study, I read the book like the very exam depends on it, and I am constantly in her office. I go to her for clarification of even the most miniscule details to make sure I am understanding it correctly. It's almost the end of the semester, and we're on a first name basis and she's even my letter of recommendation for the nursing program I am applying to next semester.

    While other students are blaming the teacher for their short-comings, I am exceling in the class. If I can do it, the other students can do it. The difference is, they refuse to, and want to blame her for their failing when it's really their refusal to adequately use all the resources available to them. They don't read their book, they cram the night before, and most of them don't even know where her office is located.

    You are responsible for your own success, even with the most difficult teachers.
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    Quote from x_factor
    While other students are blaming the teacher for their short-comings, I am exceling in the class. If I can do it, the other students can do it. The difference is, they refuse to, and want to blame her for their failing when it's really their refusal to adequately use all the resources available to them. They don't read their book, they cram the night before, and most of them don't even know where her office is located.

    You are responsible for your own success, even with the most difficult teachers.
    Thank you!
    Yes, it sucks. It can be a humbling experience when you can no longer get away with not studying for a test or doing it at the last second.

    Good luck with your studies, OP.
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