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Will Protests Lead to More COVID Surges?

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Specializes in NICU, PICU.

herring_RN, ASN, BSN

Specializes in Critical care, tele, Medical-Surgical. Has 49 years experience.

I have never lived in a segregated neighborhood. In Oklahoma our interracial (by marriage and adoption) family lived in nice houses with wonderful White neighbors a ways down the road.

When I was 12 we moved to California into an integrated town. Beginning Jr. High I met lifelong friends. We were different races and from three countries. With this virus we email and talk on the phone often. Our public school teachers were strict as well as kind so we all learned a lot. All of us earned at least bachelor's degree. I was last to do so with by BSN in my forties.

It was easier for us because my Dad was a jazz musician. Successful well known musicians integrated many blocks. Local white musicians would work with realtors to find a suburban house and purchase a house. When the new family moved in it the home was purchases already. Sometimes a few neighbors disapproved, but soon their kids were playing with neighbors and families made friends. The worst we experienced was having out of town teens call us names and throw eggs and tomatoes at us. The most successful of those musicians became famous and moved to Beverly Hills.

In 1964, "Freedom Summer", I worked to register voters in South Central LA and Compton CA. I went with another volunteer and sometimes my Grandma. The following Summer I was surprised when the Watts happened where I had met so many good people.

Regarding the George Floyd protests, I understand why so many risked their health. As an old lady I remember doing dangerous things without such an important reason as cops killing instead of protecting.

(I jumped out of an airplane after a one day sky diving class. I promised my Dad I would not do that again.)

It is way too complicated for me to judge mostly young protesters, who are probably in denial of the risks and are protesting for a good reason. Dr. King took risks to do the right think and was killed. John Lewis was beat and almost killed by police for the same cause of justice and fairness. Should they have just accepted people denying that they should be treated like the Children Of God that we all are?

Daisy4RN

Specializes in Travel, Home Health, Med-Surg. Has 20 years experience.

3 hours ago, pixierose said:

https://www.cbpp.org/research/housing/trump-administrations-proposed-rule-would-perpetuate-racist-and-discriminatory

https://www.americanbar.org/groups/crsj/publications/human_rights_magazine_home/economic-justice/fair-housing-policy-under-the-trump-administration/

My bad, he didn’t suspend ... he completely revamped ... to the detriment of POC. Did you ever question why some cities didn’t submit the paperwork?

No, pointing out that “poor neighbors need help” lacks substance because it’s a rinse-repeat reaction. Observe: Michael Brown, Tamir Rice ... “oh, we need to do something, (insert about neighborhoods/youth violence/more religion/etc) add thoughts and prayers” ... and? To me, I’m reading from your post “the poor blacks need our help!”

That’s not the issue. It’s actually part of the problem.

I agree that merely saying something isn't going to change things, but it is the first step. My point is that the people who have the power to change things are not doing it (ie the politicians in those crime ridden neighborhoods and the self appointed black leaders). Again, my point is that if they cared they would do something about it. That is not only part of the problem, it is the problem.

4 hours ago, toomuchbaloney said:

Why would anyone tell them to go home when the states are opening businesses?

Does this crap get better traction on FB posts for you?

The reopening in all places was supposed to be done in phases, so yes, some places were starting to open but with social distancing, masks etc. Large gatherings were definitely not allowed. So again what is good for the goose should be good for the gander. No exception unless you are a selfish covidiot who doesnt care about the elderly and immunocompromised that they will be spreading the virus to.

toomuchbaloney

Has 43 years experience.

Just now, Daisy4RN said:

I agree that merely saying something isn't going to change things, but it is the first step. My point is that the people who have the power to change things are not doing it (ie the politicians in those crime ridden neighborhoods and the self appointed black leaders). Again, my point is that if they cared they would do something about it. That is not only part of the problem, it is the problem.

The reopening in all places was supposed to be done in phases, so yes, some places were starting to open but with social distancing, masks etc. Large gatherings were definitely not allowed. So again what is good for the goose should be good for the gander. No exception unless you are a selfish covidiot who doesnt care about the elderly and immunocompromised that they will be spreading the virus to.

Memorial Day celebrations started it right off with a weekend of large gatherings and worship services...that were definitely not allowed. We are already seeing the uptick in cases from that opening up.

Daisy4RN

Specializes in Travel, Home Health, Med-Surg. Has 20 years experience.

1 minute ago, toomuchbaloney said:

Memorial Day celebrations started it right off with a weekend of large gatherings and worship services...that were definitely not allowed. We are already seeing the uptick in cases from that opening up.

If we are seeing an uptick then why is everyone saying that the protests are OK?

toomuchbaloney

Has 43 years experience.

8 minutes ago, Daisy4RN said:

If we are seeing an uptick then why is everyone saying that the protests are OK?

It increases risk, sure. They are taking the risk because that is their individual right. Because their motivation is based in the institutional racism that has blacks dying disproportionately at the hand of police AND because of COVID.

I believe that risking spread to protest an unjust system is more important than taking the same risk to protest the mitigation strategy itself. The more the police abuse the protesters the longer the protests will go on.

Edited by toomuchbaloney

Daisy4RN

Specializes in Travel, Home Health, Med-Surg. Has 20 years experience.

16 minutes ago, toomuchbaloney said:

It increases risk, sure. They are taking the risk because that is their individual right. Because their motivation is based in the institutional racism that has blacks dying disproportionately at the hand of police AND because of COVID.

I believe that risking spread to protest an unjust system is more important than taking the same risk to protest the mitigation strategy itself. The more the police abuse the protesters the longer the protests will go on.

If it is the individual protesters right than it is anybody else's right for whatever reason they see fit also. Again, you can't have it both ways (no matter how good anyone's reason is). And it is not just their risk to self, they are risking everyone they come in contact with.

pixierose, BSN, RN

Specializes in ED, psych. Has 4 years experience.

50 minutes ago, Daisy4RN said:

I agree that merely saying something isn't going to change things, but it is the first step. My point is that the people who have the power to change things are not doing it (ie the politicians in those crime ridden neighborhoods and the self appointed black leaders). Again, my point is that if they cared they would do something about it. That is not only part of the problem, it is the problem.

The reopening in all places was supposed to be done in phases, so yes, some places were starting to open but with social distancing, masks etc. Large gatherings were definitely not allowed. So again what is good for the goose should be good for the gander. No exception unless you are a selfish covidiot who doesnt care about the elderly and immunocompromised that they will be spreading the virus to.

But politicians have shown that they don’t do anything, time and time again - and it’s across parties. Republicans, Democrats.

What makes you think this time will be different? And a year from now, there won’t be be another George Floyd? There will be - unless there is change. And the people have spoken.

Getting back to COVID - in a *normal* society, we’d be heartbroken and angry that black people are being revictimized, pushed into the streets, to demand equal rights, during a pandemic.. We’d be desperately figuring out a way to figure out social justice in the comfort of all of our homes, wouldn’t we?

But we don’t live in a normal society. Can you even envision that happening? Because, thoughts and prayers, right? Hell, how often has Trump said anything this week alone? He twittered a baseless antifa claim about a 75-year-old man during George Floyd’s funeral, for example.

Those agitating for racial equality are not hostile to the notion of public health, unlike the All Haircuts Matter protesters. Those protesters, whom we last saw raging against quarantine orders, were explicitly committed to going mask free (look at Trump, mask free, because it makes him look weak).

I work in a COVID unit, and I have seen first hand what this virus can do. I will always wear a mask when out in public, and even though my state opened to level 2 I’ve only gotten my hair cut. We should be angry that people have been forced out to protest, not that they are out protesting.

toomuchbaloney

Has 43 years experience.

43 minutes ago, Daisy4RN said:

If it is the individual protesters right than it is anybody else's right for whatever reason they see fit also. Again, you can't have it both ways (no matter how good anyone's reason is). And it is not just their risk to self, they are risking everyone they come in contact with.

We are all allowed our opinions and analysis. You are welcome to believe that the two protests were in some way justifiably similar. I don't agree. The first protesters were intentionally breaking public health recommendations or petitioning for them to be lifted. A very significant percentage of the current protesters are attempting to at least mask.

The only way they are comparable, in my view is that they are both examples of public assembly during a pandemic.

A Hit With The Ladies, BSN, RN

Specializes in Psych. Has 5 years experience.

5 hours ago, herring_RN said:

ONLY African American protesters?

Pardon me, I forgot the college dropout Antifa rioter contingent, too.

A Hit With The Ladies, BSN, RN

Specializes in Psych. Has 5 years experience.

34 minutes ago, pixierose said:

Those agitating for racial equality are not hostile to the notion of public health, unlike the All Haircuts Matter protesters.

Talk about a strawman argument! Agitating for defunding the police is not "racial equality". Agitating for a functional economy is not "All Haircuts Matter".

Quote

We should be angry that people have been forced out to protest, not that they are out protesting.

Who 'forced' them out? They voluntarily chose to go to protest, often defying municipal curfews and even your beloved public health official social distancing orders.

Edited by A Hit With The Ladies

herring_RN, ASN, BSN

Specializes in Critical care, tele, Medical-Surgical. Has 49 years experience.

I am almost 76 years old. I have many family responsibilities. I only go to the grocery, pharmacy, and drive family member to the doctor. I just drove my a small protest a few blocks from home. It was young people I know. I honked. I think by wearing a mask, only going where everyone wears one and stays six feet from each other and washing hands often I am less likely to be infected. Do fellow allnurses.com members thin my odds of getting COVID-19 are greater from a protester wearing a mask six feet away than from someone who went to the beach and was close to others or had a haircut, ate at a restaurant or was in a croed somewhere?

JadedCPN, BSN, RN

Specializes in Pediatrics, Pediatric Float, PICU, NICU. Has 15 years experience.

2 hours ago, pixierose said:

We should be angry that people have been forced out to protest, not that they are out protesting.

This! This needs to be made into a plaque and hung.