Jump to content

Why I am leaving my last job

Posted

Specializes in CEN, ED, ICU, PSYCH, PP. Has 17 years experience.

I have decided I need to get away from the hospital system I currently work for and find a new one. Decision a long time in the making.

What are a few good reasons I can give for looking for a new job

Here's my real ones.

lazy coworkers

mean director (new in the last 3 years)

turn over of 130 staff members in 1.5 years

way to far to drive

rediculous/redundant amount of charting and paperwork

bullying

bad nurse/patient ratio

I need to work with more sophisticated staff/patients/doctors so I think urban rather than rural?

I would like to work in a more culturally diverse system (can I say that)

I've been a nurse for a long time and the system I have worked in for the last 3.5 years is killing all my desire and excitement to be a nurse anymore. I need a change

Those of you who have been on here with me for a long time know I love and care about nursing, but somethings gotta change.

Thanks guys

Emergent, RN

Has 27 years experience.

Hi. A bad manager, lots of turnover, bullying, poor ratios and long drive are strong reasons to leave a job. Ridiculous and redundant charting, however, is everywhere, you will not escape that in healthcare today. Lazy workers, also, can be found far and wide.

xoemmylouox, ASN, RN

Has 13 years experience.

Many of the reasons you list you will find many places. Some (hopefully) not so much. Being downright miserable at your job can ruin your time when you are away so it is worth trying. I wish you the best of luck with your next employer. It always amazes me how losing droves of good staff never alerts anyone that there is an issue that needs to be addressed. :banghead:

amoLucia

Specializes in LTC.

... It always amazes me how losing droves of good staff never alerts anyone that there is an issue that needs to be addressed. :banghead:
I think it's the ostrich-head-in-the-sand syndrome. They either just don't WANT to address the problem or else they just CAN'T do it.

calivianya, BSN, RN

Specializes in ICU.

It is true that redundant charting is everywhere, but some places are more ridiculous than others. Good luck finding something new! :)

Hi. A bad manager, lots of turnover, bullying, poor ratios and long drive are strong reasons to leave a job. Ridiculous and redundant charting, however, is everywhere, you will not escape that in healthcare today. Lazy workers, also, can be found far and wide.

Yesh, but some place are way worse than others.

"I want to expand my horizons."

"I want more experience in such and such."

SierraBravo

Has 3 years experience.

OP, to be honest with you, I wouldn't share the reasons you listed with anyone except maybe your significant other/family and friends. Unless I missed the point and you are trying to come up with reasons so that you can rationalize and justify leaving your job to yourself. However, if you're looking for reasons that you can actually tell a new employer as to why you left your old job, the best policy is to be honest but try to give your reasons in a neutral way.

firstinfamily, RN

Has 33 years experience.

Maybe its time to get a higher degree, that might open up more jobs for you!!! When ever I get discouraged and feel that I don't have control of my career I look at what else I can do to make myself more marketable. A certification, a higher degree usually helps when looking for other positions. The same old grind does get old after awhile, but it is up to us to inspire each other. Have you asked around at your current facility about other positions? You at least have longevity there and there might be something open that would meet your needs better. I understand the long drive gets to you, but it might help if you could qualify for a higher position!! Good LUck, we are here as the sounding board whenever you need us!!

Emergent, RN

Has 27 years experience.

If I'm being interviewed, I say positive things about my experience at my previous jobs, and positive reasons why I'm interested in the position and facility I'm applying to.

I wouldn't say I'm being bullied, my manager sucks, the ratios are lousy. Those statements can easily be interpreted to mean that you have trouble getting along, or handling the workload. Don't say your co-workers are lazy either.

Positives can be that the new place is closer, you've heard good things about retention and the quality of the workplace and its staff, and you are looking to grow professionally and stay for the long run.

icuRNmaggie, BSN, RN

Specializes in MICU, SICU, CICU. Has 24 years experience.

Do not resign until you have another job lined up and do not give your real reasons for leaving either. The present manager does not care and the prospective manager will find it very tacky and off putting if you vent about a previous employer in a job interview. Discretion and self restraint will make a much better impression.

The problems the OP listed exist, to some degree, everywhere in the hospital industry.

Hospitals have changed a lot in the last ten years and not for the better. If the leadership does not support their nurses, you have nothing.

It's not you, it's them.

As far as giving reason for leaving, you can say it is a great learning opportunity, closer to home, it works better with your family life.

Pick one and use it consistently. The less you say the better.

There is a similar thread today about resigning and protecting your professional reputation.

Take some time off in between if you can, to recuperate.

Edited by icuRNmaggie

VANurse2010

Has 6 years experience.

If I'm being interviewed, I say positive things about my experience at my previous jobs, and positive reasons why I'm interested in the position and facility I'm applying to.

I wouldn't say I'm being bullied, my manager sucks, the ratios are lousy. Those statements can easily be interpreted to mean that you have trouble getting along, or handling the workload. Don't say your co-workers are lazy either.

Positives can be that the new place is closer, you've heard good things about retention and the quality of the workplace and its staff, and you are looking to grow professionally and stay for the long run.

I have told prospective employers that the ratios were too much, but I was very specific about what we were expected to do and they agreed with me that it was ridiculous. If they didn't, I wouldn't want to work for them anyway.

"lazy coworkers

mean director (new in the last 3 years)

turn over of 130 staff members in 1.5 years

way to far to drive

rediculous/redundant amount of charting and paperwork

bullying

bad nurse/patient ratio"

These are universal problems within our profession. You have enough experience to seek out and find your "change". Decide what you want.. and go for it.

Good luck, let us know how it's going.

nursel56

Specializes in Peds/outpatient FP,derm,allergy/private duty. Has 33 years experience.

I have decided I need to get away from the hospital system I currently work for and find a new one. Decision a long time in the making.

What are a few good reasons I can give for looking for a new job

Here's my real ones.

lazy coworkers

mean director (new in the last 3 years)

turn over of 130 staff members in 1.5 years

way to far to drive

rediculous/redundant amount of charting and paperwork

bullying

bad nurse/patient ratio

I need to work with more sophisticated staff/patients/doctors so I think urban rather than rural?

I would like to work in a more culturally diverse system (can I say that)

I've been a nurse for a long time and the system I have worked in for the last 3.5 years is killing all my desire and excitement to be a nurse anymore. I need a change

Those of you who have been on here with me for a long time know I love and care about nursing, but somethings gotta change.

Thanks guys

We do know that gonzo. Sometimes our gut tells us it's time for a change. In my experience if you have that feeling persistently and ignore it you can open yourself up for more problems. Nursing is always sold as a profession that offers a huge variety of practice areas. Nothing wrong with that!

Wishing you all the best for a happy and productive new job.

gonzo1, ASN, RN

Specializes in CEN, ED, ICU, PSYCH, PP. Has 17 years experience.

Thanks to all for the input. I'll go with "much closer to my house" and "I've been wanting to get a position here since I moved to this location." And maybe a "I want to work for a larger, metropolitan hospital for greater education and opportunity."

I just started working on my RN to MSN. I would like to do nursing educator or nurse practitioner soon. I gotta get away from the bedside. (I wont tell them that)

Here.I.Stand, BSN, RN

Specializes in SICU, trauma, neuro. Has 16 years experience.

If you're wanting to move to an urban facility, say you're looking to relocate in general. I agree with PPs--don't say anything negative about your current hospital.

bendyprissy

Specializes in L&D; Post-Op Med/Surg.

I think it's the ostrich-head-in-the-sand syndrome. They either just don't WANT to address the problem or else they just CAN'T do it.

Or they just don't care because there are numerous applicants to fill the spots of people who don't want theirs.

You know when it is time to leave a job, when you hate going there. Even if it is a drop in pay it is not worth the stress of staying...because it will not get any better. When people leave jobs it is almost always because of the way the facility is managed.