What should I wear to pick up paperwork on my day off?

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JadedCPN, BSN, RN

1,476 Posts

Specializes in Pediatrics, Pediatric Float, PICU, NICU. Has 17 years experience.

I don't go into work on my off days / on a day where I don't clock in. If I'm clocked in, I'm in scrubs or professional clothing.

I have seen people come in, for whatever reason, on their off days and wearing whatever they would wear around the house - parents recognize them and it doesn't leave the best impression, whether that should matter or not.

Specializes in Peds ED. Has 12 years experience.
1 minute ago, JadedCPN said:

I don't go into work on my off days / on a day where I don't clock in. If I'm clocked in, I'm in scrubs or professional clothing.

I have seen people come in, for whatever reason, on their off days and wearing whatever they would wear around the house - parents recognize them and it doesn't leave the best impression, whether that should matter or not.

My kids have been patients where I work, and I wear what I wear on those occasions. I’m not putting on business casual to impress other parents in the er when my kid is in respiratory distress in the middle of the night, and if I’m dashing on to the unit for a moment to pick something up that can’t wait until my next shift, I’m not going to take the time to do a wardrobe change. If other parents have ever been fussed about my humanity off shift that is a them problem. If it’s ever affected my professional reputation it’s been subtle enough for me to not notice and honestly, if it ever becomes an issue *that* would affect my feelings about the employer equally as much. 

But I’ve seen my supervisors in jeans and have lived to tell the tale.

JKL33

6,465 Posts

7 hours ago, BlueShoes12 said:

I've seen lots of coworkers come in on their days off to pick up and drop off things and I've never seen someone dress up. Not once. Now, if it's a meeting or something where you're on the clock, do dress professionally, but I'll be casual as long as I'm not punched in. 

One aspect of this is...I'm not sure what people are envisioning as far as "dressing up." I guess technically I dress "up" but we're not exactly talking business suiting here. A blouse (as opposed to t-shirt material) and a pair of casual slacks/pants that are not jeans and not stretch pants or athletic attire. Shoes - not crappy looking and not noisy.

No one is required to go out of their way to dress any particular way when not on the clock. In that regard it is a matter of personal preference. I think I have worked with a number of managers who probably don't think anything of it, period, and couldn't care less.

Just the same, I still believe what I wrote in my first post and I think these are the kinds of things that can and do affect others' opinions even if subconsciously.

I once had this thought that if nurses still wore whites and caps (a tradition long gone by the time I joined this profession) it would be a really interesting observation whether so many patients felt like swearing, name-calling, basic rudeness, threats, and physical abuse. I've only worked with a couple of nurses who continued to wear the traditional uniform and no one would have dared mess with them. They were treated so differently than us younger people. Maybe the scrubs had nothing to do with it, I don't know, but I find it interesting to think about. 

I was going to run an experiment where I wore all whites +/- nursing cap but I chickened out. Plus I don't own any of that stuff.

Specializes in orthopedic; Informatics, diabetes. Has 11 years experience.

I wear whatever I am wearing for the day. Most days it's shorts, t-shirt and Birks. 

Safest bet is business casual. Know your policy. My hospital specifically says no jeans, flip flops, shorts, t-shirts, among other things. You really never know who you might run into but if you have a policy about it, you definitely don't want to be caught out-of-line with it.

ruby_jane, BSN, RN

3,142 Posts

Specializes in ICU/community health/school nursing. Has 14 years experience.

Cover your toes!! Our workspace is no jeans as well.

kbrn2002, ADN, RN

3,729 Posts

Specializes in Geriatrics, Dialysis. Has 21 years experience.

I think it depends on the culture of your workplace. Some places you wouldn't want to stop in wearing anything more relaxed than business/casual, some jeans and a t-shirt would be fine and some you could waltz in wearing your pajama's and nobody would blink an eye!  If in doubt though business casual is always appropriate. 

Rose_Queen, BSN, MSN, RN

6 Articles; 11,269 Posts

Specializes in OR, Nursing Professional Development. Has 18 years experience.
24 minutes ago, kbrn2002 said:

I think it depends on the culture of your workplace. Some places you wouldn't want to stop in wearing anything more relaxed than business/casual, some jeans and a t-shirt would be fine and some you could waltz in wearing your pajama's and nobody would blink an eye!  If in doubt though business casual is always appropriate. 

I agree with this. In my department, we change into hospital provided scrubs. People come in wearing all manner of things: regular scrubs, jeans/T-shirts, pajamas, sweats, business casual. But our culture doesn’t frown upon that as long as dress code approved attire is worn while on the clock. 

Nurse SMS, MSN, RN

2 Articles; 6,837 Posts

Specializes in Critical Care; Cardiac; Professional Development. Has 12 years experience.

Neat and tidy. Not scrubs. I wore jeans in all the time, but not grungy ones. Look put together but not ready to be put to work.

On 9/1/2020 at 9:38 PM, RoundAbout33 said:

Safest bet is business casual. Know your policy. My hospital specifically says no jeans, flip flops, shorts, t-shirts, among other things. You really never know who you might run into but if you have a policy about it, you definitely don't want to be caught out-of-line with it.

Policies only apply to time when you are getting paid. Few employers are going to pay you for the few minutes it takes to run in and pick up paperwork. They cannot dictate what you do when you aren't there representing the company.

llg, PhD, RN

13,469 Posts

Specializes in Nursing Professional Development. Has 46 years experience.

It may also matter to some employers whether or not you are wearing your ID badge.   My employer cares about that.   They feel a little differently if you are walking around the hospital with your ID badge not looking professional. 

Walking through the main lobby during a busy time looking unprofessional wearing your ID badge?   They don't like that.

Running up the back stairs at a time when there are few visitors in the hospital?  They're not so demanding.

Using some common sense and judgement is important.

On 8/30/2020 at 7:31 PM, Leader25 said:

Black leather jacket,spiked bracelet,black pants,leather boots....

Hahaha!! That would be a hoot! ?