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Shake it off

School   (1,061 Views 16 Comments)
by Rizowe Rizowe (New Member) New Member

449 Visitors; 8 Posts

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First, let me say that I devote time and effort to each child that comes in my office. BUT, I will flat out tell the students, whom I see daily for random reasons, that they are coming to the clinic too often.

I see numerous 4th and 5th graders for the most random stuff. 

"My arm hurts" (no known injury, no visible swelling, moves extremity well)

"I bumped into the door and my shoulder hurts now" (no visible injury, moves extremity well)

"I have a scab on my ear"

"Can I have water?" (um, you passed two water fountains on the way to my office)

"My ear feels cold"

I just feel like children don't know the difference in "discomfort" and "pain". I often ask what would their mom do if they were at home and they look at me like I have two heads. I will continue to document every office visit, but I would love to know what to say to these 9-10 year old children who act like the world is ending 24/7.

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tining has 23 years experience as a BSN, RN and works as a School Nurse.

1 Follower; 13,143 Visitors; 689 Posts

every single day

 

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Mavnurse17 has 2 years experience.

774 Visitors; 31 Posts

I see this at the high school level too.  And, since they're older, I try to teach them that they won't be able to lay down for 30 minutes or call mom to come get them when they're at their job out in the real world.  Sometimes you gotta hydrate and try to deal with that headache.  

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OldDude works as a School Nurse.

7 Followers; 1 Article; 28,844 Visitors; 4,764 Posts

Any intervention on your part at this stage of their life is going to be like trying to nail Jello to a tree. Just "shake it off" and be thankful the little snowflakes don't belong to you. When they move on there will be others just like em to take their place. 

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OyWithThePoodles has 10 years experience as a RN and works as a Registered Nurse.

1 Follower; 11,665 Visitors; 1,250 Posts

While I love my job, and kids coming to me is job security, at times I feel having a school nurse adds to the instant gratification/sense of entitlement kids have these days. A headache that started two minutes ago, a knee that grazed the desk. C'mon now. 

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Blue_Moon has 18 years experience as a BSN, RN and works as a Registered Nurse.

1 Article; 4,929 Visitors; 471 Posts

Yep! I think many kids will do anything for attention because they don't get any at home. Then the more you give, the more they come back. LOL! Of course there are those that get LOTS of attention at home and just feel so special they want even more. Those are the ones that annoy me the most. I also get annoyed at teachers sending kids for belly aches, headaches, earaches, etc that JUST began 2 seconds ago and the "injuries" that are invisible.

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ruby_jane has 10 years experience as a BSN, RN.

3 Followers; 8,014 Visitors; 2,279 Posts

33 minutes ago, OyWithThePoodles said:

While I love my job, and kids coming to me is job security, at times I feel having a school nurse adds to the instant gratification/sense of entitlement kids have these days. A headache that started two minutes ago, a knee that grazed the desk. C'mon now. 

Beautiful synopsis of why I am tired, why I am irritated with teachers, and why I feel like I'm swimming upstream most days. Not everything needs an ice pack, sweet pea, but it's easier to give one than to explain this. Come to think of it, this is why we have antibiotic resistance, right?

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1 Follower; 772 Visitors; 248 Posts

36 minutes ago, OyWithThePoodles said:

While I love my job, and kids coming to me is job security, at times I feel having a school nurse adds to the instant gratification/sense of entitlement kids have these days. A headache that started two minutes ago, a knee that grazed the desk. C'mon now. 

Well said, I often think this. I am full time this year at a school that has always had only a part -time nurse before. The office manager was the stand in and just sent them right back when they complained of silly stuff. As nurses though, we are required to assess / document and that takes so much time away from the nursing specific tasks that need to be done. In a way, it defeats the purpose.

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ruby_jane has 10 years experience as a BSN, RN.

3 Followers; 8,014 Visitors; 2,279 Posts

58 minutes ago, EnoughWithTheIce said:

Well said, I often think this. I am full time this year at a school that has always had only a part -time nurse before. The office manager was the stand in and just sent them right back when they complained of silly stuff. As nurses though, we are required to assess / document and that takes so much time away from the nursing specific tasks that need to be done. In a way, it defeats the purpose.

A long time ago I worked almost non-stop around EMTLA rules. You're entitled to an assessment by a qualified professional. That doesn't mean your condition warrants immediate treatment. Which is how I roll as a school nurse.

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AutumnDraidean has 20 years experience and works as a Substitute School Nurse.

1,927 Visitors; 71 Posts

On 4/18/2019 at 9:15 AM, ruby_jane said:

Beautiful synopsis of why I am tired, why I am irritated with teachers, and why I feel like I'm swimming upstream most days. Not everything needs an ice pack, sweet pea, but it's easier to give one than to explain this. Come to think of it, this is why we have antibiotic resistance, right?

Fortunately for all of us "Ice pack resistance" will never be a thing. 

At a "No throat drop" school I had a kid with a sore throat refuse a salt water rinse. Tonsils somewhat swollen, no temp. I said "If you won't do a salt water gargle I have nothing for you, go back to class." I was later thanked by the teacher, "He was avoiding a math worksheet."

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Feral.Cat.Herder has 22 years experience and works as a School Nurse.

1 Follower; 1,858 Visitors; 126 Posts

On 4/18/2019 at 8:45 AM, Blue_Moon said:

Yep! I think many kids will do anything for attention because they don't get any at home. Then the more you give, the more they come back. LOL! Of course there are those that get LOTS of attention at home and just feel so special they want even more. Those are the ones that annoy me the most. I also get annoyed at teachers sending kids for belly aches, headaches, earaches, etc that JUST began 2 seconds ago and the "injuries" that are invisible.

The teachers that's what I'm trying to figure out. 🤨  Do they send them to us because they are tired of the LDs whining? I've actually had teachers tell me they are "afraid of getting sued if they don't let them come to clinic". Really, it's just a splinter!

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1,274 Visitors; 97 Posts

On 4/18/2019 at 8:15 AM, ruby_jane said:

Beautiful synopsis of why I am tired, why I am irritated with teachers, and why I feel like I'm swimming upstream most days. Not everything needs an ice pack, sweet pea, but it's easier to give one than to explain this. Come to think of it, this is why we have antibiotic resistance, right?

100%  The battle is real. At this point in the year, I feel like I am throwing up the white flag of surrender.  Amazing how we can recharge and come back loving it all again after summer break!   I crossed the 6,000 nurse clinic visit on Thursday. Still have 28 school days to go.   This is a school of 470.  I have sent 3% of those visits home, if that tells you anything.  No diabetics this year, No seizure kids.  UGHGHGHGGHH is all I can say!!!!! 

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