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lovewaves lovewaves (New Member) New Member

RN, ADN being obsolete

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You are reading page 2 of RN, ADN being obsolete. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

None of the hospitals around here require a BSN. They prefer a certification over a BSN. ADNs get hired just as easily. They are both registered nurses with the SAME SCOPE OF PRACTICE.

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None of the hospitals around here require a BSN. They prefer a certification over a BSN. ADNs get hired just as easily. They are both registered nurses with the SAME SCOPE OF PRACTICE.

I've been advocating for that for years. Why require an experienced ADN/Diploma nurse (who doesn't want to do management) get a BSN when it would be much more worthwhile to require them to get certification in their area of specialty instead?

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Plus, how can they eliminate such a large source of nurses? Don't they know we're on the cusp of a serious nursing shortage???:eek:

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I read about a lot about a widening gap of inequality in the USA.

I think the way the ADN plays in to this is that in areas that are not thriving economically, where the population is aging, young people move away and people with 4 year degrees are not that common are the places where an ADN will do fine.

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They've said this since I began nursing school in 2011. I graduated in 2014 with a RN nursing diploma. Had no issue at all finding a job. Many of the new nurses at my current place of employment have just an associates.

It is only a problem if you'd want to work at a magnet hospital. They require BSN degrees. Research facilities in your area beforehand to see if that's something that could hold you back.

I've since obtained my BSN to futher my education. However, it hasn't made a difference in my job or salary, just my debt!

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I am going through this problem as a 2 year RN degree is being phased out everywhere, except for homecare. For 10 years there was work for the 2 year degree RN, but the last 8 years, almost nothing. I live in an area where there are way too many nursing schools churning out nurses at all levels, LPN, RN, BSN and MSN, practioner. ..and not enough jobs to supply the workforce. Consequently, you wind up with a couple hundred applicants for a handful of jobs. Do not even get me started on the way area employers have feasted upon the lopsided supply/ demand...to put it nicely, wound up walking out of an interview because I could cut the arrogance with a knife. Just like having too many burger joints in 2 square miles, there is no way to stay in business with supply and demand out of sync...but that does not stop all the bogus "10,000" sign on bonus job ads that are fake, and the continued false propoganda of a nursing shortage that never existed in the first place. OK, rant over, thank you for listening. I am now working nights at target, per diem homecare, and weekends on a farm ...so much for my 2nd career and all the money I spent for nothing.

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ASA college in NY? That's technically correct, because in NY's nurse practice act the BSN IS required now within 10 years

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It is only a problem if you'd want to work at a magnet hospital. They require BSN degrees.

There are ADN nurses working in magnet hospitals.

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As a future new-grad, I think it depends upon where you want to work. The major hospitals in my city do not hire non-BSN RNs for bedside care. Some of the smaller hospitals do, but honestly, they are small, for-profit specialty hospitals and are not ideal employers.

The exception is LTAC, which will usually hire a non-BSN RN into their acute care environment. A lot of those nurses then get their BSNs and move on to more traditional acute care hospitals.

Without a BSN, you can get a non-acute care job, like SNF, but then it is pretty hard to cross over into acute care later. If you want to end up in acute care (a traditional hospital), getting the BSN up front would be a lot easier.

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The BSN/ADN hireability curve is highly regional. In large cities on the West Coast, a new grad ADN will have a tough time gaining employment in a hosptial setting, especially is desirable specialities. I have seen ADNs in my hospital, but they have experience, are currently in classes for BSN, or were brought in as travelers, and converted to permanent.

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Where I live, the big hospital is moving toward an all BSN workforce. ADNs work in home health or LTC.

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I am going through this problem as a 2 year RN degree is being phased out everywhere, except for homecare. For 10 years there was work for the 2 year degree RN, but the last 8 years, almost nothing. I live in an area where there are way too many nursing schools churning out nurses at all levels, LPN, RN, BSN and MSN, practioner. ..and not enough jobs to supply the workforce. Consequently, you wind up with a couple hundred applicants for a handful of jobs. Do not even get me started on the way area employers have feasted upon the lopsided supply/ demand...to put it nicely, wound up walking out of an interview because I could cut the arrogance with a knife. Just like having too many burger joints in 2 square miles, there is no way to stay in business with supply and demand out of sync...but that does not stop all the bogus "10,000" sign on bonus job ads that are fake, and the continued false propoganda of a nursing shortage that never existed in the first place. OK, rant over, thank you for listening. I am now working nights at target, per diem homecare, and weekends on a farm ...so much for my 2nd career and all the money I spent for nothing.

I have ASN. I have had no problem with getting hired in two states that I have lived in. I don't agree that it is impossible for associate level RNs yo get hired. I live in a highly disadvantaged area in my state and work full time with s great salary.

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