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Quit While in Orientation (New grad)

Posted

Specializes in critical care/ICU.

Hey everyone,

So, as the title says... I am a new grad and just quit my first nursing job with less than 2 weeks on orientation. Just a little background, my first nursing job was as an ICU float RN at a level 1 trauma center rotating days/nights every 2 weeks (full time). While I was excited for this opportunity, I was not thrilled about working downtown which was an hour away from my house. I have a close hospital near me (about 25 min) that offered me a position in their Medical/Surgical ICU. I have had clinical there before and was comfortable with it, knew some of the nurses and doctors as well. Well, I decided to quit my job to accept the one closer to me. I talked with my manager and said that the commute was just more than I realized and was not having a great experience thus far. However, I feel as though I am going to be a "blacklisted" candidate or on a "do not hire" list with this hospital even though I was an "at-will" employee. Which, I never wanted to happen because they have a children's hospital that I eventually would love to go work at.

My plan was to work adult ICU for a 1-1.5 years and then work in the NICU/PICU whichever one I felt more drawn to. I now feel like that is not going to be possible as I feel they will never want to rehire me for their children's hospital (its attached to the one I was working at). Does anyone have advice for an anxious new grad who just wants to get into the specialty they want? How do I know I have been blacklisted with this company? I feel very dumb at the moment because I think I ruined my chances of ever working there again.

Please be nice in the comments. No reason to be rude! & thank you to those in advance!

speedynurse, ADN, RN, EMT-P

Specializes in ER, Pre-Op, PACU.

You have already resigned so that is done. Most people are not considered “do not hire” unless they just didn’t give proper notice. For now- I wouldn’t worry about getting in the unit that you prefer or desire. Right now, you need to get job experience during a time where the economy is fairly lousy and even nursing jobs are few and far between. Once you get some experience, then start looking for the job you prefer.

Katie82, RN

Specializes in Med Surg, Tele, PH, CM. Has 39 years experience.

Why in the world do new grads think they are ready for the ICU, ER or L&D right out of nursing school? I blame the hospitals for this.

NICU Guy, BSN, RN

Specializes in NICU. Has 6 years experience.

9 minutes ago, Katie82 said:

Why in the world do new grads think they are ready for the ICU, ER or L&D right out of nursing school? I blame the hospitals for this.

She didn't say she couldn't handle the job, it was the commute that she couldn't tolerate.

I started as a new grad in a large (103 bed) Level IV NICU. Nearly all of our new hires are semi-trained new grads. They are either former NICU Capstone students or Summer Externs (paid one-on-one preceptorship).

Emergent, RN

Specializes in ER. Has 28 years experience.

I think level 1 Trauma Centers are quite overrated as being the hot shot place where a new grad, or anyone else, should have on their resume. It may sound prestigious to name drop, but the reality is that there is a lot going on in any Hospital.

I'm currently working at a level 5 ER, and I have never seen as much action, since it's a critical access Hospital that is remote.

Been there,done that, ASN, RN

Has 33 years experience.

Your chances of being blacklisted are up the the manager. If you feel decent vibes from the split you may be okay. You could ask the manager right now, so you know what is in store.

"Please be nice in the comments." Nice is not always what's best for you and don't expect nice in ICU.

Good luck

Jedrnurse, BSN, RN

Specializes in school nurse. Has 29 years experience.

There's more than one children's hospital in the world, although honestly you may have burned a bridge with your first employer. Sounds like your current position could be a good start for you. I would recommend hanging in there for two years before moving on...

1 hour ago, Been there,done that said:

Nice is not always what's best for you and don't expect nice in ICU.

Ain't that the truth. 😁

VitaminSea, BSN, RN

Specializes in critical care/ICU.

2 hours ago, Been there,done that said:

"Please be nice in the comments." Nice is not always what's best for you and don't expect nice in ICU.

I get what you’re saying but it doesn’t mean one nurse should be rude to another 🤷🏼‍♀️ It’s a post not the ICU.

Been there,done that, ASN, RN

Has 33 years experience.

22 minutes ago, VitaminSea said:

I get what you’re saying but it doesn’t mean one nurse should be rude to another 🤷🏼‍♀️ It’s a post not the ICU.

Bottom line is you need a thick skin everywhere in nursing. If you are already trying to deflect comments here, you sound like a delicate flower.

Again, good luck.

RNNPICU, BSN, RN

Specializes in PICU. Has 13 years experience.

Hard to say whether or not you will be on the "do not rehire" list.

You were only there for 2 weeks so there would not be clinical basis.

It may not be up to your manager as to being placed on the Do not rehire list, it may be an organizational decision.

Unfortunately sometimes the decisions we make do have consequences. You have stated two things.

1. The commute was more than you anticipated

2. You were not having a great experience.

I think both the manager and HR might be questioning, why you took the job in the first place with an hour commute.

As to not having a great experience, recognizing that now may have saved you heartache and stress down the line.

Couple of questions

1. When did you realize the impact of the commute?

2. Did you just walk up and talk to the manager or how did you approach the situation?

3. How did the manager respond?

4. What about the experience wasn't so great? You have to be so careful about saying something like this as it could come across negatively.

I realize you have already resigned, but I would have asked ahead of time about the potential consequences of my action

13 hours ago, VitaminSea said:

Does anyone have advice for an anxious new grad who just wants to get into the specialty they want?

1) Stay put for awhile now. Even if it is difficult and not ideal.

2) Concentrate on learning as much as you possibly can.

3) Worry about the rest later.

There is nothing wrong with making choices that we believe are in our own interests for our own personal reasons. We just have to accept that there may be trade-offs.

I would have said no to q2week shift rotations from the outset. That's crazy. So...I think you made a great choice in more ways than one, and you might as well have done it before they spent even more time and money training you. But now that it's a done deal....relax and focus on the job you have. Don't spend your time daydreaming and fretting about something that is down the road. (And I personally wouldn't lose sleep pining away for an organization that "needs" nurses to rotate shifts q2 weeks.)

Good luck!

Hoosier_RN, MSN

Specializes in dialysis. Has 28 years experience.

1 hour ago, VitaminSea said:

I get what you’re saying but it doesn’t mean one nurse should be rude to another 🤷🏼‍♀️ It’s a post not the ICU.

When you post to random strangers on the internet, you open yourself up for whatever answers may come your way. Just because it's not what you want to hear, or isn't packaged pretty with a bow, doesn't mean it not what you NEED to hear.

If you've given proper notice you may be on the do not rehire list. If you didn't, I'd say that most likely you are. You can ask HR, they will usually tell you

speedynurse, ADN, RN, EMT-P

Specializes in ER, Pre-Op, PACU.

3 hours ago, JKL33 said:

1) Stay put for awhile now. Even if it is difficult and not ideal.

2) Concentrate on learning as much as you possibly can.

3) Worry about the rest later.

There is nothing wrong with making choices that we believe are in our own interests for our own personal reasons. We just have to accept that there may be trade-offs.

I would have said no to q2week shift rotations from the outset. That's crazy. So...I think you made a great choice in more ways than one, and you might as well have done it before they spent even more time and money training you. But now that it's a done deal....relax and focus on the job you have. Don't spend your time daydreaming and fretting about something that is down the road. (And I personally wouldn't lose sleep pining away for an organization that "needs" nurses to rotate shifts q2 weeks.)

Good luck!

I did rotating shifts like this - actually every other week nights and days. I lasted a total of 6 months 😂🤣😅

14 hours ago, Katie82 said:

Why in the world do new grads think they are ready for the ICU, ER or L&D right out of nursing school? I blame the hospitals for this.

Actually a lot of new grads do very well on these units. I started as a new grad in the ER and did very well.

NightNerd, BSN, RN

Specializes in Med-surg/tele. Has 7 years experience.

Tell me more about the not great orientation experience. Why wasn't it great, and how brutally honest were you with the manager about it? Sometimes you genuinely don't have a great picture of how a commute will feel until you're making it, but if you completely bad-mouthed their orientation...well, even if you're not officially ineligible for rehire, word gets around. When you reapply to the same hospital system, they will probably be able to see your two weeks of employment in your record, and may or may not be curious about it.

What I'm reading in your post is that the first hospital and the children's hospital you want to work at are basically in the same location, right? How realistic will it be for you to live close enough to the children's hospital once you apply? Definitely consider that before you accept another position. Just because it's a specialty you're interested in doesn't mean an hour on the road each way isn't going to wear on you.

Finally, nothing wrong with gaining peds experience in your current hospital after earning your stripes on your current unit. Give it a couple years and see if you can transfer to their peds, NICU, etc. internally if possible. I can understand the impulse to work for a specific hospital, but you may find you like this hospital, want to keep your benefits, etc. If they have those units, might be worth considering.

ruby_jane, BSN, RN

Specializes in ICU/community health/school nursing. Has 12 years experience.

19 hours ago, Katie82 said:

Why in the world do new grads think they are ready for the ICU, ER or L&D right out of nursing school? I blame the hospitals for this.

In my experience:

I was told that my Medical ICU was "just a step above med-surg" and that they would "train me until I felt comfortable" with Pt load. Which was four actual weeks of training (add in all the testing and assessments for an additional two weeks) and then to a preceptor who was exceptionally condescending about the ability of new nurses. "Not everyone is cut out to be an ICU nurse." She was like Gandalf in the river. Oh, and the ICU was three patients, sometimes four per shift AND they were rarely "a step above" Med-surg. I left when I had a pt who was on her way to being intubated (they were trying to hold it off) but she had eight lines/drips and we couldn't keep her sats up - that is quintissential ICU, folks! And they wanted me out there by myself managing that with less than six weeks' training as a new grad!

So...I did not think I could, but was told: Sure you can! But I did not know enough to know that six weeks was just not enough training. It's probably worse now with COVID-19 and certain states (including mine) allowing grad nurses to proceed without the last few months of clinical.

5 hours ago, speedynurse said:

I did rotating shifts like this - actually every other week nights and days. I lasted a total of 6 months 😂🤣😅

Actually a lot of new grads do very well on these units. I started as a new grad in the ER and did very well.

All depends on preceptor, training, and basic skills....I am glad you did well.

VitaminSea, BSN, RN

Specializes in critical care/ICU.

Thanks everyone for the input! I do feel like I made the right choice and am just going to focus on getting as much experience as I can. Learn as much as possible from the ICU and go from there. It's nice hearing from experienced individuals and their sides to their story.

5 hours ago, speedynurse said:

I did rotating shifts like this - actually every other week nights and days. I lasted a total of 6 months 😂🤣😅

This was one of the reasons why I did not think the position was going to be good for me. Rotating every 2 weeks was a huge downfall. The new position I was offered is straight nights with a chance of going to days after 6 months. I feel like I would be able to better handle that than the rotating shifts on top of driving an hour to and from work (if I am lucky with traffic).

speedynurse, ADN, RN, EMT-P

Specializes in ER, Pre-Op, PACU.

37 minutes ago, ruby_jane said:

In my experience:

I was told that my Medical ICU was "just a step above med-surg" and that they would "train me until I felt comfortable" with Pt load. Which was four actual weeks of training (add in all the testing and assessments for an additional two weeks) and then to a preceptor who was exceptionally condescending about the ability of new nurses. "Not everyone is cut out to be an ICU nurse." She was like Gandalf in the river. Oh, and the ICU was three patients, sometimes four per shift AND they were rarely "a step above" Med-surg. I left when I had a pt who was on her way to being intubated (they were trying to hold it off) but she had eight lines/drips and we couldn't keep her sats up - that is quintissential ICU, folks! And they wanted me out there by myself managing that with less than six weeks' training as a new grad!

So...I did not think I could, but was told: Sure you can! But I did not know enough to know that six weeks was just not enough training. It's probably worse now with COVID-19 and certain states (including mine) allowing grad nurses to proceed without the last few months of clinical.

All depends on preceptor, training, and basic skills....I am glad you did well.

It also depends on the team and management. I had a really wonderful team that never made me feel down on myself when I struggled early on.