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Post-interview thank you notes - do you or don't you?

Posted

Specializes in Women's Health/OB Leadership. Has 15 years experience.

I was just reading an old thread here from about three years ago, when several people mentioned that they had never heard of sending post-interview thank you notes until they came here. Others are like "...wha? Of COURSE you send a thank you note!" I've always been in the "yes, always" camp, but my husband, also an RN, has never sent one (until this last job, when he was fretting about not hearing anything back yet, and I asked if you emailed the interviewer to thank him yet, and he said that was a GENIUS idea like he had never heard of it before).

For those of you who do send thank you notes, what format? In the past, I've always sent actual blank cards and just wrote a short note "Thank you for taking the time to meet with me, I really enjoyed learning about the job" type of thing. But then someone else in that old thread compared that to a post-baby shower thank you card and thought it was unprofessional. The last couple jobs I've had, I've sent thank you emails to the interviewer.

Anyway, just wondering what others do.

Texas86RN

Has 8 years experience.

Yes, send a thank you note, it also makes you stand out from the rest

dexm

Specializes in ICU, ED.

Definitely send a thank you note! Or at least a thank you email. I sent a thank you email after my interview and ended up getting the job. Whether or not that is what "sealed the deal," I don't think it would hurt to send one!

amoLucia

Specializes in LTC.

Regardless of what others may say, I've always known it to be expected that a thank you is expected as routine. Much like the 'THANK YOU' for any gift.

It won't hurt and as PP points out, you stand out from the rest.

Also, some head honchos are from the 'old school' and your failure to send a 'Thank You' could be negatively looked upon and tag you as one who fails to follow simple common courtesy/protocol standards.

Even if you have a horrid interview, send a simple note.

nursel56

Specializes in Peds/outpatient FP,derm,allergy/private duty. Has 45 years experience.

Yes, I think the standard is to send a thank-you note now. Fifteen years ago I heard some hiring managers say they thought thank-you cards were creepy! LOL. Times change! I would definitely keep it short and to the point, though. I'm not sure about the etiquette of email vs paper, though. Maybe we'll get some feedback about a preference in that regard.

LadyFree28, BSN, RN

Specializes in Pediatrics, Rehab, Trauma. Has 10 years experience.

Well, I'm one of those who may or may not send a thank you note or email; I usually didn't send one and I still was offered a position I interviewed for.

At my most recent interview, I was offered a position, so the thank you was offered in person.

Caffeine_IV

Specializes in LTC, med/surg, hospice. Has 7 years experience.

Every job I sent a thank you note for I didn't get. The ones I didn't bother, I did get.

GrumpyRN, NP

Specializes in Emergency Department. Has 39 years experience.

I would not dream of sending a note, never heard of this idea and would be a bit perturbed by someone I interviewed sending me a note - would strike me as desperation and 'sucking up'.

Would certainly ask for/give post interview feedback but that is it. I wonder if this is an American thing?

BrandonLPN, LPN

Has 5 years experience.

I would not dream of sending a note, never heard of this idea and would be a bit perturbed by someone I interviewed sending me a note - would strike me as desperation and 'sucking up'.

Would certainly ask for/give post interview feedback but that is it. I wonder if this is an American thing?

maybe it's a generation gap thing? I find the whole idea absurd.

Thank You notes are for wedding gifts or Bar Mitzvah gifts. Situations where you don't open the gifts in front of the person who gave them. If I open a gift in front of you and say "thank you" with my own mouth to your own ears, sending a note on top of that is just stupid and unnecessary.

And Thank You notes for job interviews? That's just flat out weird and creepy.

And thank you notes for gifts you open in front of people is good etiquette

OCNRN63, RN

Specializes in Oncology; medical specialty website.

I've always sent thank you notes; I never had anyone look askance at me for doing so.

VivaLaVespaGirl, BSN, MSN

Specializes in ED, Medicine, Case Management. Has 5 years experience.

I am in the definitely send a follow-up thank you camp. My vote is for a card, for sure. Emails can be easy to overlook - especially if it ends up in spam - and everyone likes getting mail that isn't bills!

Edited by VivaLaVespaGirl
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icuRNmaggie, BSN, RN

Specializes in MICU, SICU, CICU. Has 24 years experience.

Agreed. It means a lot more when a person makes the effort to put pen to paper or a well chosen note card, put a stamp on it and mail it. A simple note that says thank you for taking the time to meet with me, it was nice to meet all of you and i was impressed with yada yada, I look forward to hearing your decision, shows gratitude, respect and good manners.

klone, MSN, RN

Specializes in Women's Health/OB Leadership. Has 15 years experience.

Texas86RN

Has 8 years experience.

Yes exactly, the person that sends a thank you note or email, will at least stand out and be acknowledged again, and if it is for a position that has a 100 aplicants, that may be the decision maker

I sent a thank you letter to both of the managers I interviewed with and it resulted in a job offer.

In my 2 year quest to land a job after graduating I was determined to "go by the book " in current job searching tips. Since it was only the 2nd interview within those 2 years I wasn't go to skip any step.

GrumpyRN, NP

Specializes in Emergency Department. Has 39 years experience.

maybe it's a generation gap thing? I find the whole idea absurd.

Could be, and I too find it absurd. However a quick 'Google' using this question; "Are post interview thank you letters normal in the UK?" Showed that it is very definitely an American thing.