I disclosed my disability and now they won't answer my calls

  1. So, here is a question for you guys... do I ignore it? Do I go talk to them? Do you think I'm making too much of a fuss? I'm at a loss but it sucks.

    Here's the story quickly. I graduated school and about a month later, while waiting to get my ATT for the NCLEX I was able to meet a hiring manager for a major hospital that I have always wanted to work for. She seemed really interested in me and gave me her information/ and was happy to talk to me. She even mentioned that if the right job came up I could be 'hired' with the caveat I get my license.

    So, one time I contacted her and she actually had a job that said they weren't hiring new grads but she knew that wasn't absolutely set in stone and told me to apply! So I do and I'm invited into an interview only to learn that they changed the shift times and is that ok? Well... no its not. I didn't really explain that time and she was really apologetic for not telling me before I got there. Then, after a few more conversations on the phone, I sort of explain without saying exactly whats up, that I can't do rotating shifts. I thought she sounded understanding but then it was like, a wall went up.

    And now its been 6 weeks with some actual possible jobs and I have my RN now. She won't answer, won't take messages, won't respond to emails. At first I thought it was because of holidays but she still won't respond or pick up. She was so helpful before, always responded, usually picked up the phone... I just don't know what to do. Should I go talk to her in person or just let it go? It's my dream hospital and I feel like I screwed up any possibility of working there.

    Thanks for any advice guys.
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  2. Visit LaneyD profile page

    About LaneyD

    Joined: Jul '16; Posts: 8; Likes: 7

    22 Comments

  3. by   Wuzzie
    Start looking for another job. This one isn't going to happen.
  4. by   VivaLasViejas
    What Wuzzie said.

    One thing to remember is that you NEVER want to disclose a disability before you get a job. Unless you need reasonable accommodations for yours, it's best to let that sleeping dog lie. You're under no obligation to give a reason why you can't work a particular shift. Employers are not supposed to discriminate on the basis of a disability, but it happens all the time, and there's really nothing you can do about it. Take this as a learning experience and move on. Best of luck.
  5. by   caliotter3
    Lots of people can never figure out why they thought they were in the running, but then get the cold shoulder from prospective employers. In your case, saying the wrong thing most likely did you in. Never repeat this mistake.
  6. by   Mulan
    Maybe I'm missing something but if the position requires rotating shifts why would they want to hire someone that can't or won't rotate?
  7. by   meanmaryjean
    What Mulan said: If you cannot meet the requirements of the job (rotating shifts) then look for another. And stop hounding the hiring manager- she likely was being nice and then you maybe over zealously started being a nuisance. (Cannot really tell but the way you worded things it's possible)

    Fill out applications at whatever facility you like. Keep at it until someone calls you back.
  8. by   meanmaryjean
    "Then, after a few more conversations on the phone, I sort of explain without saying exactly whats up, that I can't do rotating shifts. I thought she sounded understanding but then it was like, a wall went up."

    I am confused. Do have an actual disability, or are you saying you being unable or unwilling to work rotating shifts is a 'disability'?
  9. by   MunoRN
    If the position involves rotating shifts and you can't do rotating shifts, then there is no reasonable accommodations to be made, even if the reason you can't do rotating shifts is due to a protected disability.
  10. by   ponymom
    They want rotating shifts.......you cannot accommodate them......they cannot accommodate you......
  11. by   KelRN215
    Quote from meanmaryjean
    "Then, after a few more conversations on the phone, I sort of explain without saying exactly whats up, that I can't do rotating shifts. I thought she sounded understanding but then it was like, a wall went up."

    I am confused. Do have an actual disability, or are you saying you being unable or unwilling to work rotating shifts is a 'disability'?
    I am wondering the same thing.

    If the position is a rotating position, it's not even a reasonable accommodation for a disabled individual to expect not to rotate.
  12. by   Mavrick
    I don't usually pile on but, seriously? Unable/unwilling to work rotating shifts you call a disability??

    You informed the manager you cannot meet the requirements of the job she has to offer. She has moved on to interview candidates who CAN meet the requirements of the job she has to offer. If she did take your calls what would you say? You've change your mind and now you can work rotating shifts? And we're only guessing that the rotating shifts thing is the reason she's not taking your calls. She may have filled the position with a perfectly suitable candidate who prefers rotating shifts!

    Let it go. Stop hounding THIS manager.

    Keep checking the job board and only apply to jobs that don't require rotating shifts. Maybe full time nights will work for you. As a new grad you can't afford to be too picky.
  13. by   Triddin
    Contrary to popular belief, rotating schedules are not bad. And you weren't discriminated against from the information you have given us
  14. by   LaneyD
    The job originally said it wasn't rotating but when I showed up to the interview I was invited in for, they had changed it but she didn't tell me that before I got there. She apologized of course, I think she thought it wouldn't matter because for most people it wouldn't.

    I didn't (and wouldn't have) applied for a job that had requirements I couldn't meet and then try and make them accommodate me.
    Last edit by LaneyD on Jan 22

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