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I disclosed my disability and now they won't answer my calls

Disabilities   (3,910 Views 23 Comments)
by LaneyD LaneyD (New Member) New Member

673 Profile Views; 8 Posts

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So, here is a question for you guys... do I ignore it? Do I go talk to them? Do you think I'm making too much of a fuss? I'm at a loss but it sucks.

Here's the story quickly. I graduated school and about a month later, while waiting to get my ATT for the NCLEX I was able to meet a hiring manager for a major hospital that I have always wanted to work for. She seemed really interested in me and gave me her information/ and was happy to talk to me. She even mentioned that if the right job came up I could be 'hired' with the caveat I get my license.

So, one time I contacted her and she actually had a job that said they weren't hiring new grads but she knew that wasn't absolutely set in stone and told me to apply! So I do and I'm invited into an interview only to learn that they changed the shift times and is that ok? Well... no its not. I didn't really explain that time and she was really apologetic for not telling me before I got there. Then, after a few more conversations on the phone, I sort of explain without saying exactly whats up, that I can't do rotating shifts. I thought she sounded understanding but then it was like, a wall went up.

And now its been 6 weeks with some actual possible jobs and I have my RN now. She won't answer, won't take messages, won't respond to emails. At first I thought it was because of holidays but she still won't respond or pick up. She was so helpful before, always responded, usually picked up the phone... I just don't know what to do. Should I go talk to her in person or just let it go? It's my dream hospital and I feel like I screwed up any possibility of working there.

Thanks for any advice guys.

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2,840 Posts; 18,383 Profile Views

Start looking for another job. This one isn't going to happen.

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VivaLasViejas has 20 years experience as a ASN, RN and specializes in LTC, assisted living, med-surg, psych.

142 Articles; 9,641 Posts; 248,152 Profile Views

What Wuzzie said.

One thing to remember is that you NEVER want to disclose a disability before you get a job. Unless you need reasonable accommodations for yours, it's best to let that sleeping dog lie. You're under no obligation to give a reason why you can't work a particular shift. Employers are not supposed to discriminate on the basis of a disability, but it happens all the time, and there's really nothing you can do about it. Take this as a learning experience and move on. Best of luck.

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36,695 Posts; 96,696 Profile Views

Lots of people can never figure out why they thought they were in the running, but then get the cold shoulder from prospective employers. In your case, saying the wrong thing most likely did you in. Never repeat this mistake.

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2,227 Posts; 19,799 Profile Views

Maybe I'm missing something but if the position requires rotating shifts why would they want to hire someone that can't or won't rotate?

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meanmaryjean has 40 years experience as a DNP, RN and specializes in NICU, ICU, PICU, Aademia.

7,505 Posts; 64,306 Profile Views

What Mulan said: If you cannot meet the requirements of the job (rotating shifts) then look for another. And stop hounding the hiring manager- she likely was being nice and then you maybe over zealously started being a nuisance. (Cannot really tell but the way you worded things it's possible)

Fill out applications at whatever facility you like. Keep at it until someone calls you back.

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meanmaryjean has 40 years experience as a DNP, RN and specializes in NICU, ICU, PICU, Aademia.

7,505 Posts; 64,306 Profile Views

"Then, after a few more conversations on the phone, I sort of explain without saying exactly whats up, that I can't do rotating shifts. I thought she sounded understanding but then it was like, a wall went up."

I am confused. Do have an actual disability, or are you saying you being unable or unwilling to work rotating shifts is a 'disability'?

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MunoRN has 10 years experience as a RN and specializes in Critical Care.

6,169 Posts; 64,322 Profile Views

If the position involves rotating shifts and you can't do rotating shifts, then there is no reasonable accommodations to be made, even if the reason you can't do rotating shifts is due to a protected disability.

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385 Posts; 9,005 Profile Views

They want rotating shifts.......you cannot accommodate them......they cannot accommodate you......

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KelRN215 has 10 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Pedi.

1 Article; 7,344 Posts; 67,648 Profile Views

"Then, after a few more conversations on the phone, I sort of explain without saying exactly whats up, that I can't do rotating shifts. I thought she sounded understanding but then it was like, a wall went up."

I am confused. Do have an actual disability, or are you saying you being unable or unwilling to work rotating shifts is a 'disability'?

I am wondering the same thing.

If the position is a rotating position, it's not even a reasonable accommodation for a disabled individual to expect not to rotate.

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Mavrick has 30 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in 15 years in ICU, 22 years in PACU.

1,576 Posts; 23,813 Profile Views

I don't usually pile on but, seriously? Unable/unwilling to work rotating shifts you call a disability??

You informed the manager you cannot meet the requirements of the job she has to offer. She has moved on to interview candidates who CAN meet the requirements of the job she has to offer. If she did take your calls what would you say? You've change your mind and now you can work rotating shifts? And we're only guessing that the rotating shifts thing is the reason she's not taking your calls. She may have filled the position with a perfectly suitable candidate who prefers rotating shifts!

Let it go. Stop hounding THIS manager.

Keep checking the job board and only apply to jobs that don't require rotating shifts. Maybe full time nights will work for you. As a new grad you can't afford to be too picky.

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380 Posts; 3,302 Profile Views

Contrary to popular belief, rotating schedules are not bad. And you weren't discriminated against from the information you have given us

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