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what nurses do if a patient wants blood transfusions

Posted
yayita yayita (Member)

As a nurse, do you have to assist the doctor during a blood trasfusion.?

Edited by yayita

Very curious to know about this kind of situation,

Giving blood transfusions to whom? A vampire? Not my type ;-).

I see you just added to a patient. That information was missing.

Is there a specific situation you are referring to?

Esme12, ASN, BSN, RN

Specializes in Critical Care, ED, Cath lab, CTPAC,Trauma. Has 41 years experience.

I know you are still a student...we are happy to jump right in after you tell us what your research has revealed to you.

I am confused about your question...it s patient needs a blood transfusion it is given. Facilities do not randomly give blood because a patient thinks they need it.

Did you mean a patient that needs a transfusion/blood and is refusing to receive blood?

chiandre

Specializes in EDUCATION;HOMECARE;MATERNAL-CHILD; PSYCH. Has 25 years experience.

Giving blood transfusions to whom? A vampire? Not my type ;-).

I see you just added to a patient. That information was missing.

Is there a specific situation you are referring to?

Hahaha...Very funny! :roflmao:

I am sure vampires would love getting blood transfusions. I was thinking more of giving blood to Red Cross but I will take vampires too. Seriously OP, please elaborate.

Pangea Reunited, ASN, RN

Has 6 years experience.

Under most circumstances, a nurse is the one actually giving the blood transfusion ...not just assisting. Before a transfusion is given, the MD must order it and the patient must give informed consent (assuming the situation is not urgent and the patient is not incapacitated).

sistrmoon

Specializes in Oncology. Has 14 years experience.

Yeah where are these doctors who will do my transfusions for me? I work Onc...I do a lot:)

Here.I.Stand, BSN, RN

Specializes in SICU, trauma, neuro. Has 16 years experience.

Nurses don't assist the MD when giving a blood transfusion--we do it by ourselves. The MD gets consent from the pt to receive blood products (unless it's an emergent situation...say the pt has half a dozen bullets in him, he's bleeding out, unconscious w/ no family present) and orders the transfusion. The nurse or lab tech draws blood for a type and cross, and sends the requisition form to the blood bank. Blood bank sends the blood. Two nurses check to make sure it's the right pt, right type, and right product for the transfusion. Nurse administers the blood and monitors the pt.

KelRN215, BSN, RN

Specializes in Pedi. Has 10 years experience.

Where is this doctor that you speak of? Because he's not anywhere around my patient's when I'M giving them blood transfusions. Doctors typically don't give blood transfusions. Perhaps in the OR, the anesthesiologist would, I don't know but in general, nurses are the ones doing the transfusions. The doctor isn't there.

And add me to the list of people confused by the title of this thread. We don't give blood transfusions because the patient "wants" one. We give them because the patient needs one.

Mr. Murse

Specializes in critical care. Has 7 years experience.

haha. a doctor hanging blood. that's funny. the doctor may say a thing or two to the patient about it, write the order, then takes off.

nurses give blood by themselves.

VivaLasViejas, ASN, RN

Specializes in LTC, assisted living, med-surg, psych. Has 20 years experience.

I suspect that English may not be the OP's first language, hence the confusion about this post. Hopefully she will come back to this thread and elaborate a little on what she was looking for.

JBudd, MSN

Specializes in Trauma, Teaching. Has 40 years experience.

If you asking if you are required to give blood, and you morally object to it, that is another question altogether. There are many threads here about that.... mostly on religious objections.

Generally yes, we are required to give blood transfusions as ordered, with the patient's consent. Those with moral objections need to have that settled with their employer, if they cannot/will not participate, their coworkers will have to step in; which can cause hard feelings. If their employer insists, it is either resign or be fired, if accommodated, you need to cover other duties for your coworkers while they do yours.

ArtClassRN, ADN, RN

Specializes in Med Surg. Has 8 years experience.

I suspect that English may not be the OP's first language, hence the confusion about this post. Hopefully she will come back to this thread and elaborate a little on what she was looking for.

Yes, they may also be a fan of "House," where the MDs push meds, hang IVs, draw labs, run the labs, run the equipment during all tests, transport patients, perform surgeries, then take tissues/cultures/whatever from surgery, then run the path labs themselves.....

Esme12, ASN, BSN, RN

Specializes in Critical Care, ED, Cath lab, CTPAC,Trauma. Has 41 years experience.

Yes, they may also be a fan of "House," where the MDs push meds, hang IVs, draw labs, run the labs, run the equipment during all tests, transport patients, perform surgeries, then take tissues/cultures/whatever from surgery, then run the path labs themselves.....

I think we need to be cognizant that AN has members from all over the world that come here seeking information.

I'm wondering if he/she is against blood transfusions and doesn't want to participate in giving them?

firstinfamily, RN

Has 33 years experience.

I have never, never had a MD hang blood. Personally, I'm not sure they would know how. I have had a MD during a code assist with pressurizing the blood bag, but never hang the blood. I agree with the posts above, the only place a MD might even help would be in the OR and usually the anesthesiologist does this. I have noticed over the years the parameters for blood administration have lowered, we use to give blood for anyone who had a low Hgb of 10.0 and a Hct of 24-26. It seems now the Hgb has to be 8.0 or below which really puts the pt at risk of heartattack. Is this because of the cost or because of the lack of blood supply available?? It is not an insurance thing with the individual patients because I have seen it in all types of reimbursements. It is like magic when a pt who has had low blood count finally gets the blood they need. Hey, who would have thought??? I had one elderly patient who had a nephrostomy tube that was bleeding frank red blood, the attending MD did not want to send her out until her Hgb got below 8.0, meanwhile, she is getting lethargic, her B/P and Pulse are getting into dangerous parameters and guess what??? She did not want to do her PT?? So, I called the MD and asked about just tranferring her for a blood transfusion---we do not do these when sub-acute is in a LTC facility. Finally after two days of bleeding she was able to get into the outpatient services for a transfusion, hey it was like a new woman when she came back. What a pity to put this pt at risk just because of certain parameters. Anyone else with such a horror story??

emtb2rn, BSN, RN, EMT-B

Specializes in Emergency. Has 21 years experience.

I think we need to be cognizant that AN has members from all over the world that come here seeking information.

OP from staten island, ny. Which to folks from the city (manhattan) is considered to be a foreign country.

Here.I.Stand, BSN, RN

Specializes in SICU, trauma, neuro. Has 16 years experience.

It seems now the Hgb has to be 8.0 or below which really puts the pt at risk of heartattack. Is this because of the cost or because of the lack of blood supply available?? It is not an insurance thing with the individual patients because I have seen it in all types of reimbursements.

It's because with repeated blood transfusions, the risk of transfusion reactions increases.

ArtClassRN, ADN, RN

Specializes in Med Surg. Has 8 years experience.

I think we need to be cognizant that AN has members from all over the world that come here seeking information.

Who said I wasn't? I agreed with the sentiment (that's where I said, "Yes"). Then I went on to make a "House" joke, which is also shown all over the world.

I think we need to be cognizant of "House" at all times.