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JBudd MSN

Trauma, Teaching

I prefer dangerous freedom over peaceful slavery.” Thomas Jefferson

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JBudd has 40 years experience as a MSN and specializes in Trauma, Teaching.

Generally all around terrific widowed mom of 3 great kids


"The democracy will cease to exist when you take away from those who are willing to work and give to those who would not."   &&  "I prefer dangerous freedom over peaceful slavery."  Thomas Jefferson

JBudd's Latest Activity

  1. JBudd

    Study resources for nursing school

    I like Kahn Academy actually; bite size explanations of a lot of things: EKGs, cardiac conditions, etc. Online and free.
  2. JBudd

    Pathophysiology

    I did "teach" online patho for a while, and this was my frustration as well; there was so much information that I thought it was ridiculous to expect students to teach themselves just from the book. I actually withdrew from the class in favor of the 2nd instructor who came after me, (when the school had enough students for 2 sections) (she did it better than I thought I was doing). I am back in the classroom teaching something else now. The basic concepts (little late now as you are almost done 🙂 ); are what Hannabannana said above; get to the cellular level, the electrolytes K+/Na+ gates, ABGs. Look at how each system interacts with others, how does kidney disease affect the heart, which then gets to the lungs.... how the liver can make both cardiovascular and mental functioning go haywire. Every new disease, think about how it affects each major bodily system, and the 1 or 2 unique things, or cluster of things, that make it an individual disease.
  3. I googled ombudsman for elderly: "What Is an Ombudsman for Nursing Home Abuse? When a nursing home resident encounters poor care, abuse, or any other issue, it’s not always apparent who they can contact to get assistance. Luckily, there is a country-wide advocacy program to help residents. This is known as the Long-Term Care (LTC) Ombudsman program." This is from: https://www.nursinghomeabusecenter.com/elder-abuse/ombudsman/ It's a place to start if you want to help the folks that were under your care. Good for you for getting out of there!
  4. JBudd

    What’s a Crusty Old Bat?

    Now we need the link to the discussion as to the composition of said big-girl-panties: I believe there was a mention of the problems with rust in the iron ones......
  5. Yep 🙂 And to the OP, I just took the age as part of the description. It is what it is. My daughter sent me a Tshirt with "All women are equal, but the best are nurse's in their 60s!".
  6. LOL, this is a old catch phrase from years ago in AN: there were a lot of snowflakes coming in to complain about the older nurses they worked with, up to and including "they should just retire and make space for the younger nurses". They didn't want to hear any rationales behind what they were complaining about, since they obviously knew better than an old experienced Crusty (as in there long enough to grow barnacles) Old Bat (bats in the belfry! go retire!). One called us "old Biter nurses" as in unable to spell or check their own grammar...... and all of us Old COBs kind of ran with it. Hadn't seen it much for a while, but lately it is popping up in a few threads.
  7. JBudd

    Fostering as a nurse/student?

    I applied to foster older teens in my city; and half way through the home study, was told by the local branch of the children's state agency, that as a single woman who works two nights a week I would not be allowed to foster. Why? I quote "you'd be asleep all the time, so you couldn't get them to therapy or (have time to) bond with them". A social worker my chaplain daughter knows in another city absolutely blew up when she heard that, especially since I wanted those older, really hard to place teens, and wanted them to have a place to come back to forever, even after aging out. This after raising my 3 after their father died, including therapy, homeschooling, leader of all their Scout troops, band & music lessons, mult friends of my kids calling me "Mama __". Two of my children foster, and one has adopted two.
  8. JBudd

    Gross Me Out 🤮 Contest | Nurses Week

    Assisting an ENT treating a lady with sinus infections, admitted to a med-surg bed. He simply took an 18 gauge needle, went up the nare and just pushed it through the nasal bones and drained the left maxiallary sinus into an emesis basin. The crunch of the bones still makes me shiver, while watching a river of green pus pour out. Lady felt much better.
  9. JBudd

    Breakroom Pet Peeves

    LOL! I certainly did! will change it 🙂
  10. JBudd

    Breakroom Pet Peeves

    sorry! wrong thread!
  11. JBudd

    How do you guys do it for so long?

    I spent my 23rd year (of life, not nursing, 🙂 ) volunteering in orphanages in Bangladesh and India. Didn't spend a lot of money on myself, lived cheap, and had enough in savings to go. Have you thought about school nursing? there is a section under specialties that is school nurses.
  12. Hello J,

    I saw on your creds that you specialize in trauma. That's the specialty I am most interested in pursuing. I'm in my first semester, but I am a non-traditional student with enough exposure to the field  (Scribing in the ED for two years) to have some idea of what I want and do not want. 

    I have a significant interest in pursuing trauma - but I was wondering how to do so. I understand that there is a certification available after taking some additional nursing courses and recording enough hours in the ED. The routes I've seen are either ED or ICU; is there some other career field I should be considering? 

    Thank you for your time!

    1. JBudd

      JBudd, MSN

      I work at a truama center, started nursing before there was such a thing as ACLS, and later TNCC.  Basically, just working in a high volume trauma center will get you there.  I haven't looked into any specific certifications other than the ENA ones, TNCC & Advanced Trauma Core Curriculum; both about 2 day course but they go indepth on what to do. 

      So "specialize", not so much as just that is what I've done for the last 25 years, work in a Level 3 trauma center; and take the courses mentioned above.  

      I'd recommend joining ENA, they have a large library of books and resources to study.  Plus you get the Emergency Nursing Journal as part of your membership fees.

  13. This. I'm sorry you got stuck in this position, but getting your doctor to clear you, and for you to state you don't and haven't objected to being floated seems reasonable. Get the managers that asked you for a note to put in writing they were trying to protect you and asked for the PCP letter, that you did not initiate it. (check with your lawyer!) That stuff about only having 5 days to respond seems pretty iffy to me.
  14. JBudd

    Private vs. Community College

    The other question is, how easy is it to get accepted? My CC has far more applications than slots. Way less expensive though, and we have both Assoc. and BSN programs. How is the private one faster? everyone has to have a certain minimum number of classroom and clinical hours. Is it accredited?
  15. There are nasty people everywhere, and you happened to get one as a patient. Again, you are not a terrible nurse, you did the right thing, and if it hadn't been you it would simply have been a different nurse he was nasty to.
  16. So, when he was awake again he said no pain and refused the morphine? It means he just wanted a percocet, not that he was in pain. Yes sleep is an escape, but not a peaceful one. If he was resting quietly, just chart that. If they change the order without telling him, that's on them. Next time just say "you need to discuss that with your doctor, the oncall MD wasn't willing to change the order". Don't put yourself in the middle. YOU DID NOTHING WRONG, and you certainly did not "fail" this patient.