LPN's aren't real nurses

  1. This topic seriously irks me to no end. I myself am an LPN. I went to school for 18 months,went to every clinical, took the NCLEX, passed the NCLEX all for other people to assume LPN's aren't 'real nurses'. I worked my butt off to be able to call myself an LPN. I just don't seem it's fair to put down LPN's because of their title.

    my best friend and I were having a conversation today about my new job and how it's a great opportunity for when I move on to get my RN. He said something among the lines of "it's a great experience for when you become a nurse!" I said "I'm a nurse now..." "oh when you get your RN I mean"

    i suppose maybe I'm being sensitive of the topic or people just truly don't know what LPN stands for?
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    About laurennnxo26

    Joined: May '15; Posts: 14; Likes: 11

    49 Comments

  3. by   BSNbeDONE
    I once attended a seminar that was held by a BSN-RN speaker. She repeatedly addressed the audience as "nurses and LPNs". At first, I thought it was a slip of the tongue. But, after 8 hours and a "thank you to all the nurses and LPNs in attendance", I accepted the fact that the ignorant walks among us. There is nothing that we can do about it.
  4. by   ThePrincessBride
    Well what does the N in LPN stand for?

    Of course LPNs are nurses. Anyone who says any differently doesn't know any better.
  5. by   Horseshoe
    Quote from BSNbeDONE
    I once attended a seminar that was held by a BSN-RN speaker. She repeatedly addressed the audience as "nurses and LPNs". At first, I thought it was a slip of the tongue. But, after 8 hours and a "thank you to all the nurses and LPNs in attendance", I accepted the fact that the ignorant walks among us. There is nothing that we can do about it.
    I disagree. Anyone listening could have called her out on it.
  6. by   SaltySarcasticSally
    I hate to tell you but your going to have to prepare this your whole LPN career. I am a semester away from graduating RN school, we had a hospice nurse come into tell us about her field. She repeatedly said "Nurses and LPNs..." etc, etc, etc. I am thinking she didn't realize she was in front of LPN to RN students lol. Even though LPN is not a title your granted yourself, many people will think your calling yourself a nurse but really aren't one. It's not fun but try to learn to brush it off because it's not going away anytime soon.
  7. by   amoLucia
    To BSNbeDone - if you had a post-conference evaluation form, did you comment about it? I really would have said something about here being demoralizing and disrespectful to the LPNs/LVNs.

    I would have commented how I felt embarrassed that she was contributing to furthering poor relationships among nurses.

    People DO read those evals. And at least I would have made my opinion known.
  8. by   TheCommuter
    I've said it before and I'll say it again, Peeps...it is best to tactfully correct people at the very moment they misspeak. Ruminating over it after the fact does no good. With that having been said, I think the original poster handled it nicely.

    While some may think poorly of LPNs, I honestly feel that others are undereducated about all that they do in nursing. I was an LPN for 4 years and it laid the foundation of my nursing career. LPNs are nurses in their own right.
  9. by   VivaLasViejas
    My son is an LPN working in a SNF as a charge nurse. He does almost everything the RNs do, including IVs and complex wound dressing changes, and even though he's going on to RN school and beyond, he gets frustrated that what he does isn't as highly respected as the work of RNs. I like to remind him every so often that at least he won't be one to look down on LPNs when he's a nurse practitioner someday.
  10. by   E-commerce
    This way of thinking is the underlying factor of the egocentric worldview of superiority and hierarchy that affects team collaboration
    Last edit by E-commerce on Dec 11, '16
  11. by   Sue Damonas
    LPN certainty are nurses! I have the highest respect for them. I learned so much from them when I was in nursing school.
  12. by   Mr.Bill RN, BSN
    Quote from laurennnxo26
    This topic seriously irks me to no end. I myself am an LPN. I went to school for 18 months,went to every clinical, took the NCLEX, passed the NCLEX all for other people to assume LPN's aren't 'real nurses'. I worked my butt off to be able to call myself an LPN. I just don't seem it's fair to put down LPN's because of their title.

    my best friend and I were having a conversation today about my new job and how it's a great opportunity for when I move on to get my RN. He said something among the lines of "it's a great experience for when you become a nurse!" I said "I'm a nurse now..." "oh when you get your RN I mean"

    i suppose maybe I'm being sensitive of the topic or people just truly don't know what LPN stands for?
    I was an LPN prior to becoming an RN, and an RN before getting my BSN. There weren't many individuals that looked down on me as an LPN, but the few that did have some nasty comments, were not the smartest peas in the field. In fact, later on, my LPN experience, with some decent RN experience got me a management position, their BOSS MAN . Licensed Practical Nurse is an excellent entry position. On the other hand, licensed practical nurses are limited by law, therefore we can't really compare them as equal to Registered Nurses. Positives of being an LPN is the nursing experience. For each year of experience you get 1/2 year of Registered Nurse experience in Ohio. The availability of scholarships to go from LPN to RN is pretty impressive. Excellent employment opportunities are available, but you do have to search a little. As an LPN I was making a whooping 41.56 an hour. Shorter time to get your RN if you do a bridge program. The negatives of the Licensed Practical Nurse are limitations and position availability. Some schools let you become an LPN without pre-requisite work, later, making it harder to get your RN. It takes about 9-12 months to become an LPN if you go to school full time. You go through nursing school twice. Pay varies from location to location, the lowest offer I received was $16/hr. LPN school is an investment and can cost you 10k or more. Is the Licensed Practical Nurse worth the investment? In my opinion ABSOLUTELY. Would I choose to be an LPN before an RN if I had to do it over again? ABSOLUTELY. Why? Many Registered Nurses I came to know sit in 40/60/80 or more thousand in debt. That's from school alone. Unacceptable for a position that starts you off at 65k. As an LPN you are a LICENSED NURSE. The body of education is less, therefore you are more of an assistive staff. Don't let the comments get to you, hold your head up, continue your education, make appropriate financial decisions, you will be on top of the nursing chain in the long run. Good luck.
  13. by   laurennnxo26
    I love this and completely agree with you! I'm from Connecticut and went to a state LPN program where the cost was a whopping 11,500 and was lucky enough to have wonderful parents who paid it out of pocket and left me with 0 debt after school. I just landed a great job at a vascular surgeons office making 55K my first year which I think is great. I'm done with RN pre-reqs and will apply to programs next fall so I have time to save. I think it's great that you ended up being the boss of the people who put you down. I can't wait to do the same one day!!
  14. by   lhflanurseNP
    Not only did I appreciate everything I learned from LPNs while a student nurse (many moons ago)...I learned even more as a "new nurse". LPNs are definitely nurses in my book!

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