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Looking for guidance...

Posted

Hi y'all was wondering if by your own experience y'all could guide me in the proper direction..I am currently going for my CNA certification, however I'm eager to become an LVN/LPN, My question is do I have to work as a CNA first before I continue with my education or can I just continue on to obtain my licences? Just not sure which way to go, or what would be more feasible, add I previously stated in my other post time is of the essence,

TheCommuter, BSN, RN

Specializes in Case mgmt., rehab, (CRRN), LTC & psych. Has 15 years experience.

Working as a CNA prior to becoming an LVN is not necessary. Although it might be helpful, it is not needed.

I had no CNA certificate or experience when I enrolled in an LVN program 11 years ago. You will learn CNA skills during the first few months of an LVN program and be given the option to take the state test to become a CNA if you're interested.

Farawyn

Has 25 years experience.

CNA has nothing to do with going to school for being a nurse, outside of hospital experience, etc.

You do not need to be a CNA as a requirement for school.

I've enquired in several schools,tech schools to be specific , and each stated that I needed my credits from being a CNA in order to qualify for the LVN courses, Is that because, maybe it being a tech school...???

I've enquired in several schools,tech schools to be specific , and each stated that I needed my credits from being a CNA in order to qualify for the LVN courses, Is that because, maybe it being a tech school...???

Might be the specific requirements of that school. I have noted that some schools do require you to be a CNA prior to starting the program. If you are not wanting to obtain your certification (CNA) then perhaps you can look into other schools. Not all require you to be a CNA prior to starting.

quiltynurse56, LPN, LVN

Specializes in LTC and Pediatrics. Has 3 years experience.

The Community Colleges near where I live all require you to have the CNA class and be certified as a prereq for either LPN or ADN school. It is not necessary to work as a CNA while in school, though if you want to, it will help you to become more comfortable around patients and caring for them.

It seems like the schools around you have the same requirements regarding the CNA certification as they do around me. The first semester of nursing school will focus on nursing skills that CNA's don't do. You will already have learned how to perform ADL's.

So in y'alls opinion which would be the best course of action, do I work as a CNA for a bit then continue with school for LVN, or just continue on with school...I'm assuming the experience I'll receive as a CNA would be beneficial, like a step ahead so to speak, once I start the LVN courses, my goal is to be a licenced nurse by the golden age of fifty,I'll be forty eight this December...:/, but not giving up

middleagednurse

Specializes in nurseline,med surg, PD. Has 50+ years experience.

Find out what you school requires, then do it.

Here's what I think:

You should get your CNA first. It is not necessary to become a nurse, but it is very helpful in getting your first job as a nurse after you graduate. It also helps you get into school.

Once you get into nursing school, being a CNA will help you in Fundamentals. It will also help you not be that scared-to-touch-a-patient student that gets on everyone's nerves in clinical. But that's it. After the first semester, you really don't have an advantage, except on your resumé when you graduate. Try to get into a hospital and work as a CNA while you are in school. You will have a much greater chance of landing a first job in acute care.

From the y'all, I am assuming you are Southern, like me. In the South, a lot of trade schools and community colleges require you to be a CNA first. They believe it weeds out the people who are too grossed out by bodies to be nurses and saves them some effort.

I was a CNA first, nurse second, and it opened a few doors for me that were closed for people who didn't have any healthcare experience. In the same context, working as a medical assistant or unit secretary is also beneficial for getting that first job. Just make sure that if your program requires the CNA certificate that you get it.

twinmommy+2, ADN, BSN, MSN

Specializes in ED. Has 16 years experience.

I think you should do CNA work first. Its not only helpful to know what those guys go through, but to also know that what they do is part of your job as a nurse. You should know how to do it well.

CNA has nothing to do with going to school for being a nurse, outside of hospital experience, etc.

You do not need to be a CNA as a requirement for school.

Some schools do require you to be certified first :-/

FolksBtrippin, BSN, RN

Specializes in Psychiatry, Pediatrics, Public Health.

Either way is fine, do whatever works for you. In my area, after the first semester of LPN school, you are a CNA. Given your age and your eagerness to get your LPN, I would probably just plug right through to the LPN, but do what works for you.

SmilingBluEyes

Specializes in Specializes in L/D, newborn, GYN, LTC, Dialysis. Has 24 years experience.

The school where I graduated, currently requires CNA before admission to nursing school these days. Didn't when I went in the late 90s.

imintrouble, BSN, RN

Specializes in LTC Rehab Med/Surg. Has 16 years experience.

CNA has nothing to do with going to school for being a nurse, outside of hospital experience, etc.

You do not need to be a CNA as a requirement for school.

The college I attended requires CNA credentials prior to being admitted into the program.

I think it's an added layer to weed out potential nursing candidates.

There's a huge waiting list for all programs where I live.

Being a CNA first, gives you a much needed layer of confidence when dealing with patients.

I consider it a good thing.

I suggest getting your CNA certification. It will give you clinical experience and an a good start in nursing school. I feel that working in the field first will also give you insight as to wheather nursing is really for you. It's a hard job physically and mentally, but rewarding.

Here's what I think:

You should get your CNA first. It is not necessary to become a nurse, but it is very helpful in getting your first job as a nurse after you graduate. It also helps you get into school.

Once you get into nursing school, being a CNA will help you in Fundamentals. It will also help you not be that scared-to-touch-a-patient student that gets on everyone's nerves in clinical. But that's it. After the first semester, you really don't have an advantage, except on your resumé when you graduate. Try to get into a hospital and work as a CNA while you are in school. You will have a much greater chance of landing a first job in acute care.

From the y'all, I am assuming you are Southern, like me. In the South, a lot of trade schools and community colleges require you to be a CNA first. They believe it weeds out the people who are too grossed out by bodies to be nurses and saves them some effort.

I was a CNA first, nurse second, and it opened a few doors for me that were closed for people who didn't have any healthcare experience. In the same context, working as a medical assistant or unit secretary is also beneficial for getting that first job. Just make sure that if your program requires the CNA certificate that you get it.

Amen.

NurseSpeedy, ADN, LPN, RN

Has 19 years experience.

I've enquired in several schools,tech schools to be specific , and each stated that I needed my credits from being a CNA in order to qualify for the LVN courses, Is that because, maybe it being a tech school...???

Every school has their own requirements. I went to PN school because the community college that I was interested at the time required a CNA or an LPN to get into their RN program and the bridge program didn't have a three year wait list so I got my LPN first (long story as to why I'm still working on the RN). The LPN program had the six weeks of CNA training incorperated into it so we learned it then but if the student had already taken an approved course, then they could start after that period (my state allowed (not sure if still allows) a person to challenge the CNA exam without going through a formal program)

Here's what I think:

You should get your CNA first. It is not necessary to become a nurse, but it is very helpful in getting your first job as a nurse after you graduate. It also helps you get into school.

Once you get into nursing school, being a CNA will help you in Fundamentals. It will also help you not be that scared-to-touch-a-patient student that gets on everyone's nerves in clinical. But that's it. After the first semester, you really don't have an advantage, except on your resumé when you graduate. Try to get into a hospital and work as a CNA while you are in school. You will have a much greater chance of landing a first job in acute care.

From the y'all, I am assuming you are Southern, like me. In the South, a lot of trade schools and community colleges require you to be a CNA first. They believe it weeds out the people who are too grossed out by bodies to be nurses and saves them some effort.

I was a CNA first, nurse second, and it opened a few doors for me that were closed for people who didn't have any healthcare experience. In the same context, working as a medical assistant or unit secretary is also beneficial for getting that first job. Just make sure that if your program requires the CNA certificate that you get it.

Thank you for your advise it seems very logical as well as most productive, and yes I'm from the south ,Texas, to be exact. A far as employment,I am hoping to work in a hospital as a CNA while I continue with my education, but again I've noticed others posted that some hospitals are asking for at least a minimum of 6 mo. experience in some form of a LTC facility, which brings me to my next question, would it be wise to apply at a hospital upon completion of my N.A. or wait the 6 months??