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canigraduate

canigraduate

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  1. canigraduate

    The Cannibalism of Nursing

    If you search the site, there's actually a "flounce" bingo card. Here's one I pulled up for you:
  2. canigraduate

    Stupid, lazy, or ADHD?

    Hi! Sorry for the late reply. I'm working on my BSN and don't come here as often. I haven't disclosed at work to my management, just to a couple of my coworkers. So far, I haven't needed accommodations. Just realize, nurses are some of the most judgmental coworkers on the planet. Be careful who you disclose to. In my experience, until the current societal image of mental health changes for the better, it's best not to tell your employer unless you have an excellent relationship with your manager. If you don't, that manager will use every mistake you make as a disciplinary action and will eventually fire you for cause.
  3. canigraduate

    I'm Not Flaky, Lazy, Or Stupid...

    Thank you! That means a lot!
  4. canigraduate

    What Does Hyperactive ADHD Look Like?

    FACTS: Hyperactive/impulsive behaviors Unable To Be Completely Still Children often fiddle with pencils/crayons in class, fidget, tap their fingers or their toes, take overshirts or jackets off and put them back on, toy with their clothing or with fasteners, click pens, etc. Teens and adults tend to bounce their knees, doodle, take excessive notes, pass notes in class, flip through textbooks, read and reread agendas or other meeting documents, flip through reports, twirl pens, tap pens, change positions frequently, and so forth. Have A Hard Time Remaining Seated Children will get up frequently in class, ask to use the bathroom frequently, find excuses to get up and look out the windows, get up while eating, get on the floor while supposed to be sitting, and get up for frequent snacks and bathroom breaks while doing homework. Teens and adults will offer to do tasks that require standing or walking, claim that sitting hurts their back and stand against the wall, shift position frequently, leave to get beverages or snacks. They may also take frequent bathroom breaks, get up and down for extras during dinner, clean or do several other tasks while watching television, and stand or walk around while talking on the telephone. Tend To Run Around Or Climb Inappropriately Children will often display these behaviors while participating in sports or other structured activities; to the child with ADHD, the world is often a fascinating obstacle course. Teens and adults have usually learned to stop doing this, but are often restless. This behavior can be exaggerated in situations where it is appropriate, such as while participating in sports or outdoor activities. Patients will often search out opportunities to be physically active, like participating in martial arts, taking self-defense classes, running obstacle courses and marathons, or sports. Tend To Get Loud While Participating In Quiet Activities Children can be loud, argumentative, and confrontational during structured quiet time. Teens and adults often show this while watching sports or television by talking to or yelling at the screen, as well as by becoming overly competitive and loud while playing board or card games. Seem Unable To Stop And Rest Children may be unable to stop themselves from an enjoyable activity, or may complete one activity and dive straight into the next; this is characterized as acting as though they are "driven by a motor." Teens and adults may display "driven" behaviors towards school, work, or leisure activities. This can be mistaken for commitment, but is similar to short-term obsession. The teen and adult with ADHD are frequently enthusiastic to the extreme about a new project, video game, garage band, concept for entrepreneurship, and so on. Teens may stay up all night playing music or games even though they have class the next day. Adults may be unable to stop work in the middle of a task and continue on to finish it even though it takes hours and affects sleep patterns. Artists and craftspeople may work without sleeping until exhausted or until a project is complete. In teens and adults, this symptom can be mistaken for mania. Another term for this symptom is hyperfocus. Talk When It Is Inappropriate Children may talk excessively in class or during activities, tell stories constantly, socialize during class time, and may be characterized as a "motormouth." Teens and adults may dominate conversations, especially when excited, or talk over others. Tend To Blurt Children do not wait to be called on and shout out answers in class or at home even before the question is finished, say whatever they are thinking without thought to the consequences, and change subjects in the middle of sentences. Teens and adults answer questions before they are finished, make uncensored comments, say hurtful things without meaning to, and have trouble staying on topic. Doesn't Want To Take Turns Children have a hard time waiting for their turn, preferring for it to be their turn all the time. They may become frustrated and tearful when it is another child's turn. Teens and adults may lose interest in long games and look for a more exciting activity, break in line, or get frustrated while waiting in line and leave. Butts In ADHDers often miss social cues that indicate an intrusion is not welcome and will do things such as interrupt speakers, interject during movies, walk through a photo op, barge into rooms, and break into other's conversations. These patients may be labeled as a "busy-body." Impulsive For ADHD children, action is often synonymous with thought; an affected child will chase after something it sees that it wants, change direction mid-stride, break into running, slide to a stop, grab for things without being careful, snatch toys, hit other children, scream suddenly, or throw things when frustrated. Teens and adults often make poorly thought out decisions, such as choosing a college because their friend got in, taking the first job offered, spontaneous road trips, sudden turns while driving, making expensive purchases on a whim. These patients may be described as "flighty." FICTION: "Only boys are hyperactive." Females are diagnosed with hyperactive/impulsive type ADHD, as well as combined type. In females, the trait displays more as excessive talking and hyper-social behavior. "There's nothing wrong with that child except a lack of discipline." While discipline and structure can help a child mitigate behavioral symptoms, the underlying ADHD is not cured. "Boys will be boys!" The often out-of-control behavior that is typical of males with hyperactive/impulsive symptoms is not a normal manifestation of maleness. These children often need help to learn how to regulate their behavior. "There's nothing wrong with that girl except too much pent-up energy." While getting enough exercise is an important element in treating ADHD, it is only part of a complete treatment plan. "That's just a bad kid." Children with ADHD are not inherently bad. With proper treatment, they can be very successful. First article in the series: Stupid, lazy, or ADHD? References American Psychiatric Association (APA), "What is ADHD?" What Is ADHD? National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), "Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder" NIMH >> Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), "Symptoms and Diagnosis" Symptoms and Diagnosis | ADHD | NCBDDD | CDC Children and Adults with Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (CHADD) The National Resource on ADHD, "About ADHD: About ADHD | CHADD
  5. canigraduate

    Stupid, lazy, or ADHD?

    You're welcome! I'll post another one, soon.
  6. canigraduate

    Stupid, lazy, or ADHD?

    I don't. I don't know you at all. Rather than getting upset and defensive, perhaps you would like to share? I only meant that you don't have ADHD. I didn't mean that you haven't had your own share of troubles.
  7. canigraduate

    Stupid, lazy, or ADHD?

    A bad employee is a bad employee. ADHD can pose problems, but does not give someone carte blanche at work. You sound contemptuous of people who have ADHD. Be glad you don't have it and don't have to deal with other's poor opinions of you over something you can't get rid of.
  8. canigraduate

    Stupid, lazy, or ADHD?

    Woot!! An endorsement from one of my fave school nurses. Joyous day!!
  9. canigraduate

    Stupid, lazy, or ADHD?

    ((((Hugs)))) I think it's harder for the intelligent people with ADHD because people expect more out of us. When we can hyper focus, we are superstars, and that's what people expect ALL the time. When we return to our baseline of "absentminded professor," then others get upset at us. We have a condition that is defined by inconsistency, and a society that depends on predictability. The clash is often volatile. One thing to remember is that most of the time it's just as hard for our loved ones and coworkers as it is for us. They literally cannot understand what is going on with us and we seem totally alien to them.
  10. canigraduate

    Stupid, lazy, or ADHD?

    Hahahaa!! It sounds like we have a lot in common. I'm on my 3rd round of college, 3rd or 4th career, and I usually either go to school and work or work two jobs. It's crazy how we can all have the same diagnosis and present differently. My mom was diagnosed as an adult and she was primarily inattentive. I'm combined. My dad is hyper and has learning disabilities. My one brother is combined and my other is straight up hyperactive. We all have different symptoms. My next article is going to be about recognizing ADHD symptoms in yourself and others. I'm looking forward to the comments on that one!!
  11. canigraduate

    Stupid, lazy, or ADHD?

    Thank you!
  12. canigraduate

    Stupid, lazy, or ADHD?

    I am pretty open about my late diagnosis of ADHD and the difficulties I have faced because of it. A lot of the hardship I have faced stems from the fact that there is so much misinformation out there about the disorder. There are a lot of disreputable people out there preying on the vulnerable and pushing unscientific "cures" and treatments. There are just as many good-intentioned people who are trying to "help" but have no clue. This article is the first in a series that I hope will shatter some of the misconceptions and bring the facts of ADHD out into the open. ADHD FACTS ADHD stands for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. It is one of the most common mental illnesses. According to the American Psychiatric Association (APA), it affects an estimated 5% of children and 2.5% of adults. Usually, it is diagnosed in childhood, when the affected child starts having trouble in school. The condition is diagnosed more frequently in boys than girls. Unfortunately, there are some people who do not get diagnosed until much later in life. ADHD is broken down into three types: hyperactive-impulsive, inattentive, and combined type. Hyperactivity is defined by the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) as when "a person seems to move about constantly, including situations in which it is not appropriate, excessively fidgets, taps, or talks. In adults, it may be extreme restlessness or wearing others out with their activity." The NIMH defines impulsivity as when "a person makes hasty actions that occur in the moment without first thinking about them and that may have high potential for harm; or a desire for immediate rewards or inability to delay gratification. An impulsive person may be socially intrusive and excessively interrupt others or make important decisions without considering the long-term consequences." According to the NIMH, inattention is characterized by a person who "wanders off task, lacks persistence, has difficulty sustaining focus, and is disorganized; and these problems are not due to defiance or lack of comprehension." ADHD severity and type vary per person. Males are more often diagnosed with the hyperactive-impulsive type. Females are more often diagnosed with the inattentive type. ADHD FICTION There are a great many misconceptions about what ADHD is, and isn't. "There's no such thing as ADHD. That child is just spoiled." ADHD is a condition, not a result of poor parenting. According to the CDC, ADHD is a neurodevelopmental disorder. "Everyone has a little ADHD." According to the APA, even though ADHD is one of the most common mental disorders, it only affects approximately 5% of children and 2.5% of adults. "All children act that way!" While all children may display the symptoms of ADHD occasionally, affected children have the symptoms more severely, more often, and the symptoms reduce social function, school function, and quality of home life. "Only boys have ADHD." It is true that males are diagnosed more often, but females also have ADHD. Obviously, since I am female! "All kids with ADHD are hyperactive." Children with inattentive type ADHD often appear dreamy or lost in their own world. "There's nothing wrong with you, you just need to try harder." Believe me when I say that those with ADHD are most likely already trying as hard as they can. References American Psychiatric Association (APA), "What is ADHD?" What Is ADHD? National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), "Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder" NIMH >> Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), "Facts About ADHD" Facts | ADHD | NCBDDD | CDC CDC, "Data and Statistics" Data and Statistics | ADHD | NCBDDD | CDC
  13. canigraduate

    Day 3: 2016 Nurses Week Meme Contest

    Last one...
  14. canigraduate

    Day 3: 2016 Nurses Week Meme Contest

  15. canigraduate

    Day 3: 2016 Nurses Week Meme Contest

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