Nursing day time - page 2

Hi all. I hope you can help. The past few weeks have been quite stressful. I'm about to graduate from my RN program in December of 2017. ( yes so soon!!!). I'm having quite a dilemma or at least some... Read More

  1. by   NurseYoshi
    Hi.

    I am a night shift tech/CNA/PCT whatever you want to call it in Alabama. We typically start new people on days (techs and nurses) and swap them over to nights IF they are hired to work nights. We lost one of our new techs to day shift because he was hired for nights but day shift lost some people so he trained on days and ended up being kept on days. Our newer night nurses also got quite a bit of training done on days. My hospital is also one of our teaching hospitals, so there are practically no restrictions for new grads anywhere (although experience is always preferred.) I'd suggest talking to the nurse manager on some units where you did clinicals and see if they're hiring (if you liked those units).

    Good luck with your searching.
  2. by   BSN16
    Quote from nsumrein
    I mean he is a doctor himself (resident), I'm not really sure on his take as to why, but I'm hoping due to his status it will be a good connect for me to get one, hopefully?
    probably not
  3. by   Here.I.Stand
    Quote from nsumrein
    I mean he is a doctor himself (resident), I'm not really sure on his take as to why, but I'm hoping due to his status it will be a good connect for me to get one, hopefully?
    I sincerely doubt that a nurse manager would view your husband's job as a reason to give you preference over their more senior staff. (Nepotism in general is frowned upon.) I can almost guarantee that some of the unit's nurses have been waiting YEARS for a spot on dayshift. To give it to a new grad by virtue of being married to a resident and make someone else wait LONGER ... the NM might as well bring some tar and feathers for their longtime employees to use.
  4. by   cleback
    You may not be able to avoid nights. This is more true if you had your heart set on acute care or another bedside specialty.

    Your husbands position will not help you secure a day shift position.

    I'm surprised your husband isn't more understanding, being in the medical field himself. I mean, can you request that he doesn't take overnight call? Probably not. The upside is you will have a good chance at working 12 hours, so if you work full or part time, that's only 3 or fewer night shifts a week.

    Good luck!
  5. by   Okami_CCRN
    I will tell you from working in NJ that if you want to work in acute care, chances are you will not find a day shift position as a new graduate nurse.

    However, you may have some luck in outpatient, long-term, or home health. I would not attempt to use the "my husband is a resident/attending" card as it will make more trouble for you than it is worth.
  6. by   Julius Seizure
    I've worked in Florida - New grads started on nights. Same with most new staff with experience.

    I've worked in Texas - New grads started on a rotating shift where every 8 weeks you would flip from days to nights, or nights to days. New staff with experience generally started on nights.

    I've worked in Pennsylvania - Depending on the unit, new grads started on nights (regular floors), or on a rotating shift (ICU).

    I've worked in Michigan - New staff (including experienced nurses) started on nights (12-hour shifts), nights (8-hour shift), or occasionally evenings (8-hour shift).
  7. by   ThePrincessBride
    If you work in acute care, be prepared to pay your dues.

    I now work days, but I put in over a year on nights. Some of my coworkers worked less graveyard shifts before going to days. But our unit has high turnover and a lot of people are unhappy. The more desirable places will expect at least two full years of nights before having a chance of switching shifts.

    That being said, I loved nights. I miss the people and the money, and it is usually less crazy. However, I love not sleeping my off days away and having my schedule more conducive to having a relationship and a family.
  8. by   FolksBtrippin
    I'm in NJ and I found a day shift position as a new grad. I work every Fri and every other Sat and Sun though whereas most of the nurses on my unit work every third weekend. It's fine for me though! I am orienting to night shift so that I can pick up extra shifts at night if I want to and I appreciate that.
  9. by   WookieeRN
    I got a day shift position as a new grad, but only because I got a position in the PACU (where it's easier to start new nurses on days than nights due to patient assignments). Most of my friends that were hired in the same hospital on different units are doing rotating shifts of 1 month on days, 1 month on nights. One of my friends was hired specifically for nights.
  10. by   amoLucia
    I'm finding it hard to grasp that this is becoming an issue only NOW as your graduation approaches. Like had this NOT been a discussion between the 2 of you before now with some years of your past schooling. Night shift is just a part of nsg, just like working July 4 and Christmas, or bad snowy days or second/third desired dates for vaca time. Or are there some unrealistic expectations here also?

    The reality is that you really just might, maybe, perhaps, possibly, I don't know if..., etc secure a day position. But I wouldn't bet the mortgage on it!

    Doesn't your husband do rotation hours???

    And like others have commented, expecting some kind of entitlement or preferential treatment because your spouse is a resident is very unrealistic.
  11. by   LovingLife123
    There is a rationale to new grads working nights at first. We always start people on nights. It's better for you to learn on nights. There is not as much going on so you can learn how to take care of your patients better.

    Days are difficult. It is crazy hectic and as a new grad, you will burn out quickly. Nights are hard, but I value my time on there. It was good for me to learn.
  12. by   Ruby Vee
    Quote from nsumrein
    Hi all. I hope you can help. The past few weeks have been quite stressful. I'm about to graduate from my RN program in December of 2017. ( yes so soon!!!). I'm having quite a dilemma or at least some kind of relief. So I am married and my husband is 100% supportive of my nursing career. But the only issue he has is working night shifts. I live in NJ, and all I hear is it's hard to get day shift for new grDs? How true is this. Because he absolutely doesn't want me working nights at all! And it scares me that I won't find a job anywhere!!! And as far as that goes if I do end up landing a day time position, do the orientation require night work? are the flexible in working with me if I prefer days only. Ugh I need some relief before I start this job hunt!!!
    Starting out on day shift as a new grad is difficult. Usually those coveted straight day positions go to someone who is already established on the unit and has been on the waiting list for a while.

    My question is about your husband. Why is he so adamantly opposed to night shift? And is he controlling in other ways? That's a red flag.
  13. by   Ruby Vee
    Quote from llg
    You mean you haven't even communicated with him enough to know why he feels strongly about you working night shifts.

    Step 1: Communicate with your husband. Find out why he is expecting you to limit your career opportunities.

    There is no reasonable Step 2 until you complete Step 1.
    And if you cannot communicate with your husband, why not?

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