Med Errors

  1. OK, so you're working along and you come across an error made by your fellow nurse. Let's say it's an omitted dose. Maybe the med was given, maybe it wasn't, but you can't tell because it wasn't signed off.

    Do you report it every single time?
  2. Poll: Do you report every error you find?

    • Always

      11.29% 7
    • Sometimes

      64.52% 40
    • Never

      14.52% 9
    • I use another approach--please discuss.

      9.68% 6
    62 Votes
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    About UM Review RN, RN

    Joined: Aug '04; Posts: 9,279; Likes: 4,302

    15 Comments

  4. by   florianslove
    No, especially if it wasn't a critical med. I always ask the nurse first. Sometimes they just forgot to sign the MAR. None of us are perfect, I would give the nurse the benefit of the doubt.

    Roxann
  5. by   FireStarterRN
    Very rarely. It's too much trouble and causes bad feelings among co-workers. Would normally call the nurse at home after researching on a missed dose.
  6. by   labcat01
    Quote from florianslove
    No, especially if it wasn't a critical med. I always ask the nurse first. Sometimes they just forgot to sign the MAR. None of us are perfect, I would give the nurse the benefit of the doubt.

    Roxann

    Ditto
  7. by   tngranny
    Ditto
  8. by   morte
    i would get writers cramp and so would the nurses following me......somewhat facetious, but not entirely
  9. by   nursalicious
    Quote from florianslove
    No, especially if it wasn't a critical med. I always ask the nurse first. Sometimes they just forgot to sign the MAR. None of us are perfect, I would give the nurse the benefit of the doubt.

    Roxann
    I totally agree.
  10. by   pagandeva2000
    I would rather discuss it with the nurse first. There are so many distractions that can occur within the minute preventing instant charting that it is not worth ruining my relationships with these people to report it if it can be solved. I would also want the same to be done for me, so, I 'do unto others'.
  11. by   SuesquatchRN
    No, no, no.
  12. by   StNeotser
    If it's a hole in the MAR I normally can speak to the nurse who should have signed it off and say By the by, I noticed you didn't sign off so and so's coumadin. Then the balls in their court.
  13. by   sissiesmama
    Quote from FireStarterRN
    Very rarely. It's too much trouble and causes bad feelings among co-workers. Would normally call the nurse at home after researching on a missed dose.
    Me too. Like FS said, it causes bad feelings amongst us, and if there were a way that I could call them or do a little checking and find the answer, I would rather go thatt route. As nurses our job is difficult just keeping our patients safe and on the right track, and docs happy, and supervisors and family ...

    If it were something that would have to be documented, I'll do it - but a lot of times your shift is just so busy and if you have a patient or two crashing on you, something just goes without getting documented.

    Kind of the "do unto others", if I were the nurse, I would appreciate the chance to say that I gave it.

    Anne, RNC
  14. by   Spidey's mom
    oops . .. I voted before reading the first post. I thought the poll was about whether I report MY own med errors and I voted that I always report them.

    If I find an omitted dose or something by another nurse, I go to that nurse first.

    steph
  15. by   NurseKatie08
    Our computer med-pass system has a component called an omissions report. At the end of our shifts, we're supposed to check our omissions report, therefore if you missed a med, the ball is in your court as far as how to deal with it. On my shift, the usual med-pass times are 1600, 1800, 2000, 2200, but things can be easily missed if people don't check all med pass hours on your shift.
    I once reported a fellow nurses med error..a patient reported to me (actually, the pt was a retired RN) that she had rec'd a pill on day shift that didn't look like something she usually took. She had rec'd another pt's BP med, thankfully with no ill effects, BP was stable, no new orders from her MD. I felt awful having to fill out the report, but it would have been on me if I never did anything. The nurse who made the error saw me the next day and actually thanked me for catching it. The patient herself said she felt so stupid because she knew her meds and knew she shouldn't have taken it.

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