Jump to content

Firearms

Nurses   (24,071 Views | 285 Replies)

13,118 Profile Views; 1,855 Posts

You are reading page 8 of Firearms. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

PMFB-RN has 16 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in burn ICU, SICU, ER, Traum Rapid Response.

5,144 Posts; 69,573 Profile Views

In Florida' date=' a fourth DUI conviction comes with permanent revocation of the driver's license with no chance of a hardship license. That would be an example of a person who is not legally allowed to drive a car.[/quote']

Revocation of a driver's license doesn't make it illegal for them to drive a car. The drivers license is only a license to drive on public roads. They could, for example, continue to drive a car on a race track, or any private land / road.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

PMFB-RN has 16 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in burn ICU, SICU, ER, Traum Rapid Response.

5,144 Posts; 69,573 Profile Views

I feel like I know you well enough to not really be sure if you're being serious, but there are a number of ways a person isn't allowed to drive a car, some examples; they have not proven they are proficient in the safe use of a car, they have been found guilty of various crimes involving the use of a car; vehicular manslaughter, repetitive DUI, etc.

I am quite serious. None of the things you mentioned would make it illegal for a person to drive a car in my state. It may prevent them from legally driving on public roads, but would not prohibit them from getting behind the wheel and driving to their heart's content at, say a race track. At least not in my state it wouldn't.

Cars are sometimes referred as being "street legal", this refers to cars that are legal to drive in public as opposed to those that aren't, such as those with excessive top speeds, lacking bumpers of approved height, lacking sufficient fenders, lacking sufficient indicators/lights, etc

But none of those things are actually illegal to equip a car with, but may prevent legal operation on public roads. Most of the race cars I have seen are not equipped with head lights, turn signals, etc and are perfectly legal to own, possess, and drive. They can even be on the public roads if not being driven, for example being hauled on a trailer, or displayed in a mall, car show, etc.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

490 Posts; 7,166 Profile Views

Hospitals don't ban firearms on the property because they serve purpose of self-defense, they ban them because they do the opposite. Of shootings that occur in hospital ER's by patients or visitors, 23% of the guns used in those shootings were taken from guards or other staff. Twenty three percent. Of the situations were guards or other staff manage to be the ones that use their guns, those shootings are overwhelmingly inappropriate.

The other 77% brought their own weapons then?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Pangea Reunited has 6 years experience as a ASN, RN.

1,547 Posts; 21,571 Profile Views

Hospitals don't ban firearms on the property because they serve purpose of self-defense, they ban them because they do the opposite. Of shootings that occur in hospital ER's by patients or visitors, 23% of the guns used in those shootings were taken from guards or other staff. Twenty three percent. Of the situations were guards or other staff manage to be the ones that use their guns, those shootings are overwhelmingly inappropriate.

I own guns, I like using guns, but from a basic risk-vs-benefit view I don't see how it makes sense to allow hospital staff to carry.

I don't disagree with banning guns from hospitals, I just disagree with this (in general):

"I've never understood this rationale. Someone who drives over the speed limit clearly doesn't care about what the legal speed limit is, should we just do away with speed limits? Someone who robs houses clearly doesn't care that it's illegal, should we just do away with the law that says it's illegal to rob houses?"

...didn't realize you were talking about weapons in hospitals, specifically.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

224 Posts; 3,573 Profile Views

I've seen research point both ways. I don't trust any of it tbh.

That said in the state I'm in CC is a right for any legal gun owner. I have carried concealed for years. I do not carry at work. I work in an er, and do not believe that carrying a gun would make me any safer. Jm2c

BSN GCU 2014.

Sent from my iPhone using allnurses

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Asystole RN is a BSN, RN and specializes in Vascular Access, Infusion Therapy.

2,292 Posts; 26,964 Profile Views

Carrying a firearm is a personal choice that does not need to be justified.

I personally carry a firearm like I carry a AAA card or life insurance. It's not because I am afraid or concerned that I will ever actually need them but that I believe it is reasonable and prudent.

I think it's a personal choice though, like wearing a helmet while riding a motorcycle.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Tenebrae has 8 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Mental Health, Gerontology, Palliative.

1 Article; 1,550 Posts; 11,249 Profile Views

I was responding to this comment you made:

My experience in New Zealand is that people ARE allowed to carry firearms. I did it, as did the Kiwis I hunted with.

And this doesn't differ from what I said. If people have the proper licensing they are allowed to own weapons for hunting. When not in use they have to be safely stored in locked storage

The owner of the shop where I purchased my firearms told me that for all practical purposes, handgun where not available in New Zealand, with only certain exceptions, and not at all to a non citizen like me.

.

I'm surprised that you were allowed to buy a gun without a license

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

heron has 40 years experience as a ASN, RN and specializes in Hospice.

1 Follower; 2,542 Posts; 38,994 Profile Views

Having made an equally conscious decision to go unarmed, I mostly worry about being caught in the crossfire. I'm 65 years old and not particularly spry. Duck and cover is likely to break bones and I can't afford to lose that much work.

I'm a skeptical soul and have my doubts that a concealed carry permit means much by way of actual skill. Kinda like passing the NCLEX.

So, I disagree with concealed carry in my workplace. Too many cowboys in Albuquerque.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Farawyn has 25 years experience and specializes in A little bit of everything..

2 Followers; 12,645 Posts; 98,346 Profile Views

Having made an equally conscious decision to go unarmed, I mostly worry about being caught in the crossfire. I'm 65 years old and not particularly spry. Duck and cover is likely to break bones and I can't afford to lose that much work.

I'm a skeptical soul and have my doubts that a concealed carry permit means much by way of actual skill. Kinda like passing the NCLEX.

So, I disagree with concealed carry in my workplace. Too many cowboys in Albuquerque.

NY as well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

quiltynurse56 has 3 years experience as a LPN, LVN and specializes in LTC and Pediatrics.

952 Posts; 13,213 Profile Views

At my facility, you are not allowed to carry or have a weapon in your car. The second part is what I don't like. As a result, I don't have mine with me very much as it is a pain to put it in and to take it out of the car all the time. If I could lock it in a box in a concealed compartment in my car, what is the harm. I guess it has to do with people not locking cars or locking up their firearms at certain times.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bortaz has 11 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in CDI Supervisor; Formerly NICU.

1 Article; 2,627 Posts; 35,866 Profile Views

At my facility, you are not allowed to carry or have a weapon in your car. The second part is what I don't like. As a result, I don't have mine with me very much as it is a pain to put it in and to take it out of the car all the time. If I could lock it in a box in a concealed compartment in my car, what is the harm. I guess it has to do with people not locking cars or locking up their firearms at certain times.

Thankfully, Texas passed a law that allows an employee to keep a gun in their vehicle at work. Businesses are not allowed to prohibit it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

akulahawkRN has 5 years experience as a ADN, RN, EMT-P and specializes in Emergency Department.

2 Followers; 3,447 Posts; 28,039 Profile Views

At my facility, you are not allowed to carry or have a weapon in your car. The second part is what I don't like. As a result, I don't have mine with me very much as it is a pain to put it in and to take it out of the car all the time. If I could lock it in a box in a concealed compartment in my car, what is the harm. I guess it has to do with people not locking cars or locking up their firearms at certain times.

They generally may not prohibit you from securing your weapon if you're not parked on their property. If the property is rather large and there are lots of "no parking" around the property, that can be a problem. Know the laws in your state as your state may or may not allow an employer to prohibit in-vehicle firearm storage, as long as the firearm is secure.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
×

This site uses cookies. By using this site, you consent to the placement of these cookies. Read our Privacy, Cookies, and Terms of Service Policies to learn more.