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Asystole RN BSN, RN

Vascular Access, Infusion Therapy
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Asystole RN is a BSN, RN and specializes in Vascular Access, Infusion Therapy.

Asystole RN's Latest Activity

  1. From their perspective they may see it as their country leading in medical science. If a vaccine is proved in their country it would make international news and help foster the idea that the country is a center of biomedical research helping to increase grants and foreign investment. This is why you see various countries pushing various research and helping to fund and advertise this research, (Koreans and cloning, the French 3D printing organ scaffolding, the Israelies and robotics, etc). There is also the possible benefit of actually improving the health of their citizens. Whether improving health with experimental vaccines is smart or may not alter the possible intention of the leaders. I make it a rule to not attribute malice to that which is sufficiently explained by ignorance.
  2. Asystole RN

    Nursing Is No Longer Worth It

    I personally think a lot of our issues stem to how nursing is viewed institutionally and legally. In the 70's before the DRG, HIPAA, HCAHPS or any other the modern non-sense there was a large debate over how to control healthcare costs. The early PPS system that was the predecessor to the modern MS-DRG system intentionally sought to control healthcare spending by controlling the single largest and most variable (read controllable) expense any organization has, and that is labor costs. Today hospitals are literally financially penalized by the federal government for staffing heavy. If anyone is interested you can find the old health econ articles on controlling healthcare costs by controlling nursing wages and the nurse to patient ratio, most of the articles are written in the 70's and 80's. Personally I think we should be reimbursed by our patients, not hourly by the hospital. As professionals we should be compensated for the skilled work that we do and thus be allowed to bill for services rendered. When I practiced vascular access I billed for the services I rendered. I was paid a flat fee for each service regardless if it took me 5 minutes or 5 hours. It allowed me to focus on the important things and give attention to the things that were important.
  3. Asystole RN

    Nursing Is No Longer Worth It

    What is changing is our awareness. The modern healthcare environment is several orders of magnitude safer today than it was when my mother was practicing. Today we have gloves, we sharps protection, smoking indoors is banned, there is training and some lift assistance etc. Along with growing safer our awareness of the danger has grown as well. This phenomenon is similar to what is seen in the news. If one took their view of the reality of the world one would think things are worse than ever. In reality the world has not become worse, it has only become smaller and more recorded. I think this quote from Will Smith regarding racism is describes this phenomenon well, "When I hear people say "it's worse than it's ever been", I really disagree completely. It's clearly not as bad as it was in the 60s, and it's certainly not as bad as it was in the 1860s'...'Racism isn't getting worse, it's getting filmed'."
  4. If you are looking purely at a national level, sure, but keep in mind you have cities, counties, and states reporting numbers that are then aggregated into the national numbers. Not only are they watching the numbers but so are a multitude of other organizations. The United States is somewhat unique compared to many other countries in that information from our individual states is widely available to the world, instead of just seeing an aggregated national number.
  5. One must first assume that the reported numbers are accurate. Like what we are seeing in other countries, what one attributes to COVID versus other health issues such as "pneumonia" has drastic implications for the reported numbers. I would recommend taking things with a grain of salt. Not unlike the reported 0 COVID cases in N. Korea.
  6. Xenophobia and the racist stereotypes of “dirtiness” "News of the coronavirus is amplifying a specific form of bigotry, called sinophobia — hostility against China, its people, people of Chinese descent, or Chinese culture. “Historically, in both popular and scientific discourse, contagious disease has often been linked, in a blanket way, to population groups thought to be ‘outsiders,’” he said. He points out that similar narratives were portrayed against Haitian immigrants in the early days of the HIV epidemic in America, as they were the only group singled out as “high risk” because of their nationality. In trying to explain part of this dynamic, Chowkwanyun says, “In general, when there is a zeitgeist of racial backlash and xenophobia, it drips down into medical discourse. Given the tensions between the [US] and China now, it’s not surprising to see that happening with coronavirus.” https://www.vox.com/2020/2/7/21126758/coronavirus-xenophobia-racism-china-asians There are a variety of theories of where the virus came from and how humans were affected but there is no definitive link yet. There is some information, some correlation, but no causation. So someone has seen a small part of China on a short trip and saw a few foreign cultural practices and now has jumped to the unsupported conclusion that those practices caused Coronavirus. Nice. OP doesn't discuss the hygiene of stadium bathrooms, OP doesn't discuss the food practices of Tenessee where there is a law defending the rights of Tenesseans to eat roadkill https://www.chicagotribune.com/news/ct-xpm-1999-03-14-9903140236-story.html. We don't discuss Detroit, we don't discuss the sanitation on U.S. reservations. Nope, China is dirty and disgusting based off a very limited and very targeted trip and thus there is no surprise dirty and disgusting Chinese are responsible for disease. Leading with fear, xenophobia, and lightly veiled racism.
  7. I’m sorry you think calling out blatant racism and xenophobia is “offensive culture” but racism just isn’t acceptable anymore. What does meat preparation in open air markets have to do with Coronavirus? There is no substantiated link and open air markets are common throughout the world, not just China...and that’s a fact. Do you think the Chinese eat live rats? Do you think that is their culture? Do you think Chinese food is made of pet dogs and cats too? I have seen videos of American women drinking urine and eating feces, is that normal behavior? Is that the American culture? Nothing you or what the OP mentioned has anything whatsoever to do with Coronavirus and are excuses to differentiate and discriminate against the Chinese due to xenophobia.
  8. This article reeks of xenophobia and lightly veiled racism. Coronavirus was first identified in China so the Chinese must have done something to cause it. Chinese culture is different from western culture so those differences must have caused it. Not dissimilar to the hype that blamed HIV on homosexuals or the patently racist MSG hype around Chinese restaurants. The fact is little is actually known about the origins of the virus, it is far too early to make any claims. OMG, you saw someone eat a whole fish with a head and scales and everything!?!?! Pretty damn common practice in Northern Michigan. "The overall attitude though is not one of cleanliness and sanitation." Based on what? This is different from who exactly? Ever been to a Broncos game? Blaming this on Chinese culture with literally ZERO evidence is the height of xenophobia and racism.
  9. Asystole RN

    Bill Approved to Limit Treatment for Transgender Youth

    Not mature enough to vote, smoke, drink alcohol, sometimes drive with unrestricted licenses, or sometimes engage in sexual conduct but mature enough to make major life changing medical decisions? I am not saying one way or the other but sheesh, can we decide how old is old enough?
  10. I am guessing there might be some exceptions.
  11. I have learned that demonstrating the sexual security and confidence to wear and do things that are not considered traditionally masculine is the ultimate form of masculinity. A good example is the father allowing his daughter to paint his nails. It is like catnip for women. Be secure in whatever your sexual identity is and be confident in yourself, nothing else matters.
  12. Asystole RN

    How many more decades?!?

    I would urge you to look into the Prospective Payment System and the rationale for the MS-DRG and labor base rate in the early 1980's. Nurse to patient ratios were an early target for federal healthcare spending reform.
  13. Asystole RN

    Nursing Home Resident Taunted by CNAs

    Long term care is a woefully under represented issue in the United States. On average, each facility is reimbursed just over $200 per person per day...which initially sounds like a lot right? Average hotel rate per day in the United States is $133 and the gross profit margin is about 30% so lets figure it costs an average of around $93 per day to run a hospitality organization. Lets say for a wing of 30 residents they have 1 nurse who makes $25/hr and 1 CNA who makes $12/hr with 24/hr coverage. The organization has to pay about 1.3 times the hourly rate given taxes and benefits and such so the facility is paying $32.50/hr and $15.60/hr respectively for a total of $1,154.40 for 24hr coverage for 1 nurse and 1 CNA. Average that over the 30 patients and it is $38.48 per patient per day. Throwing in other miscellaneous staff such as billers, secretaries, admins, etc and you are probably looking at close to $50 in payroll per patient per day. If you figure in normal non-specialized food it may cost on average about $12.93 in groceries for 3 meals with no snacks. Lets round that up to $15 a day to include some snacks and beverages. Keep in mind I am not counting in the cost of cooking which is much higher than home due to the cost of commercial cooking and the regulatory requirements but $15 might be fair. When you account for just the hospitality ($93/day), clinical staffing ($50/day), and the cost of groceries ($15/day) you are looking at $158 to house a single LTC patient. This of course does not factor in the all of the other expenses that might occur such as something as simple as entertainment. As a country we pay for the bare minimum treatment of our elders. Personally I wish we would do more to encourage home care. Maybe reimburse family members that $200day which would help to offset having home care (16 hours of CNA coverage at $15/hr = $240/day) along with tax incentives. https://www.statista.com/statistics/208133/us-hotel-revenue-per-available-room-by-month/ https://smallbusiness.chron.com/gross-margin-hotels-36581.html https://web.mit.edu/e-club/hadzima/how-much-does-an-employee-cost.html https://www.forbes.com/sites/priceonomics/2018/07/10/heres-how-much-money-do-you-save-by-cooking-at-home/#21a7154e35e5
  14. Asystole RN

    Making 100k salary/ income?

    Agreed, I work with many lawyers in my current role and I make more than all of them except for a few higher profile director level individuals lol. Its about what you do with your education and background.
  15. Asystole RN

    Just Say “NO” to Nurse Staffing Laws

    This is a rather narrow view of the issue that completely ignores the history of healthcare within the United States and the roles of federal reimbursement statutes that have aimed to control healthcare spending by deliberately targeting healthcare labor costs, especially nursing. And what is your solution to do away with private innovation? Planned market economies have been tried in the past. I know many scientists, researchers, and developers who do what they do solely to benefit their communities. I know a scientist who researches new antimicrobials because a family member died from an infection. I know a developer who developed products for his bed bound mother. Your sweeping disparaging comments are not helpful. Yes there are snakes but the vast majority of those who I know who work to innovate new medical products do so for deeply personal reasons. Keep in mind that you yourself make a profit from the sick and vulnerable. Is nursing immoral because we take a paycheck home? You work in an industry that profits from sick citizens. Change starts at home... The vast majority of money used for research and development doesn't come from profits, it doesn't come from grants, it comes from investors. The primary advantage most of these companies have is that they are attractive to investors so it brings in money for research. The balance is that the company must produce so that the investor gets a return. Check out planned market economies and their rate of innovation and gross output. This has historically been tried, many times. Should be some good reading. I agree with the cost transparency statement but I have no idea what you mean by auditing procedures. There are already an incredible amount of auditing procedures and various government bodies involved in medical manufacturing. Is there something specific you want to know that is not already publicly reported? You and your for-profit employer both profit off of sick citizens, huh. Let me know when you figure out how to stop profiting from sick citizens yourself. Change starts at home. Throwing stones in a glass house. You choose the phrase. Profit is not inherently bad but blaming private industry for poor staffing when there are literally federal laws and many, many papers written about controlling healthcare spending by controlling labor costs, in particular nursing labor costs, through federal reimbursement statues is ill-aimed.
  16. Asystole RN

    Just Say “NO” to Nurse Staffing Laws

    I think most everyone supports a certain staffing minimum. The question though is how you account for all of the myriad of variables just within hospitals alone and do you stop at just a staffing minimum instead of planning for the optimum? LTACHs, Critical Access Hospitals, etc.