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Does everybody want to be a NP?

Posted

Or... should I say does every NP think all nurses want to be NPs?! In my experience, that's how they act. Even when I'm being seen as a patient, the NP is hurried, and seriously has an air like "yeah, bet you wish you were an NP". Even the nurses who are just in NP SCHOOL say things like 'yeah, I'm going to get my REAL education so that I can be a REAL professional/get a REAL job.' So rude!

Is being an NP really that much better than say having an MBA? Or being a PT? Or a registered dietician? I don't even think we should compare NP with floor nurse, because a typical floor nurse will not have an advanced degree. Am I wrong?

Hoosier_RN, MSN

Specializes in dialysis. Has 28 years experience.

We just had this discussion where I work. None of us discussing it wants NP behind our names, nothing personal against them, but not a role we want. 4 of us who have at least 15 yrs or greater as a nurse are all thinking of pursuing MSN management role (I have 2 classes left for nursing educator, but they are over 10 yrs old, and I no longer want that role). So no, not for everyone. But I've gotten that attitude from some NPs and MDs...just ignore it and find your own path in your own time. I may not pursue the MSN for a while...someone has to be at the bedside 😜

I don't recall ever encountering anything like that.

klone, MSN, RN

Specializes in Women's Health/OB Leadership. Has 15 years experience.

I don't recall ever encountering anything like that.

Nor have I.

traumaRUs, MSN, APRN, CNS

Specializes in Nephrology, Cardiology, ER, ICU. Has 27 years experience.

I'll chime in here too. Is this perhaps just your specific workplace?

I've been an APN for 9+ years and the RNs come to me first and all say I'm very approachable. I've just not encountered this experience.

Everline

Specializes in public health, women's health, reproductive health.

Some people just have that air about them. I've experienced it in varying professions. I don't know that many nurse practitioners but the last one I encountered was very down to earth and friendly. As a general rule, whenever I sense an "air" about someone, especially having to do with superiority, I have to check myself (as uncomfortable as that may be), because sometimes it is something within me that makes me sense that about them.

The NPs that I work with are phenomenal. I can ask them anything at any time. Without them my job would be even tougher, so no, I do not see this attitude.

I have an MBA and have had numerous management positions. You don't need the MBA to do what I do but I believe it has opened some doors for me that I otherwise wouldn't have been able to walk through!

VANurse2010

Has 6 years experience.

The actual, licensed NPs I've worked with have all been good, down-to-earth and professional. Now, my old unit was a feeder unit for NP schools and we had several who were actively enrolled in NP school - talk about some b_____es.

I personally don't really have any desire to be an NP. I don't particularly want to be an RN, either, for that matter. In any case, often an RN can make more than an NP, at least in my area, and with enough experience can take roles away from the bedside, or at least with less bedside contact.

BrnEyedGirl, BSN, MSN, RN, APRN

Specializes in Cardiac, ER. Has 18 years experience.

I agree with a previous poster, perhaps it's the area you are in. I have a good relationship with all the NP's I know. They were nurses, they understand the job I do. I am currently in an MSN-FNP program, not because it is any "better" than many other options or degrees, but because after 19 years of inpatient acute care I feel I would like to move out of the hospital to a "normal" work week, stop working every holiday etc. MSN-FNP seemed to be a natural progression to my education and career path.

TheCommuter, BSN, RN

Specializes in Case mgmt., rehab, (CRRN), LTC & psych. Has 15 years experience.

I do not want to be a NP. The thought of having to see 30+ patients per day in a doctors' office or clinic for 8 to 10 hours a day, five days a week, simply depresses me. I'd feel trapped. I also wouldn't want to be an acute care NP who rounds on hospital patients.

I'm okay with not calling the shots. I'm enrolled in an MSN-nursing education program. I also suspect a glut of FNPs will be here in a few short years.

Dogen

Specializes in Behavioral Health. Has 1 years experience.

I agree with a previous poster, perhaps it's the area you are in. I have a good relationship with all the NP's I know. They were nurses, they understand the job I do. I am currently in an MSN-FNP program, not because it is any "better" than many other options or degrees, but because after 19 years of inpatient acute care I feel I would like to move out of the hospital to a "normal" work week, stop working every holiday etc. MSN-FNP seemed to be a natural progression to my education and career path.

Yeah. I like working with patients but wanted to have a more normal schedule and get out of inpatient psych (love psych, hate the MH system). In my area I'll make more as an outpatient NP than as an inpatient nurse (since an outpatient nurse typically makes less, that seems like a good distinction), but not dramatically more, and it's not my primary motivator. Weekends and holidays off, working outpatient, and actually helping people is a win-win-win.

But, that's me. Apparently some people like night shift at the hospital enough to start threads about it. I've avoided whatever head trauma they've obviously suffered, but good for them, right? Do whatever you feel like. I'm a total team player. Everyone has a role, and I don't care if you're a house keeper, a receptionist, or an MD, we all play on the same team.

ixchel

Specializes in critical care.

I have never encountered this attitude, either. All (except one) of the NPs I've known and worked with have been wonderful and patient-centered. I've appreciated the very evident difference between NP and MD in practice, seeing how the NPs focus strongly not just on treatment of things gone wrong, but also on what is going on holistically. Not saying a good doctor skips this, mind you, but it's not as much a priority. They have case managers and floor nurses filling those gaps for them. I love NPs!

dirtyhippiegirl, BSN, RN

Specializes in PDN; Burn; Phone triage. Has 8 years experience.

I do wonder whether the NP job bubble is going to burst? I have absolutely no hard numbers but it does seem like "everyone" is either in NP school or planning on it. In my last unit, 1/2 of the nurses were in school part-time to become NPs. I would get floated to higher acuity ICUs and the numbers would be worse when you threw in the folks leaving to start CRNA school.

At some point there ia going to be a glut of NPs, right?

ixchel

Specializes in critical care.

Yeah. I like working with patients but wanted to have a more normal schedule and get out of inpatient psych (love psych, hate the MH system). In my area I'll make more as an outpatient NP than as an inpatient nurse (since an outpatient nurse typically makes less, that seems like a good distinction), but not dramatically more, and it's not my primary motivator. Weekends and holidays off, working outpatient, and actually helping people is a win-win-win.

But, that's me. Apparently some people like night shift at the hospital enough to start threads about it. I've avoided whatever head trauma they've obviously suffered, but good for them, right? Do whatever you feel like. I'm a total team player. Everyone has a role, and I don't care if you're a house keeper, a receptionist, or an MD, we all play on the same team.

Night shift is amazeballs. More money, less annoying interruptions, and usually there is time for my derrière to hit a chair at some point.

Carry on.

Hoosier_RN, MSN

Specializes in dialysis. Has 28 years experience.

I want to add to my first post that I know approximately 10 NPs, and I can only say 2 have the attitude. The rest are down to earth.

Dogen

Specializes in Behavioral Health. Has 1 years experience.

Night shift is amazeballs. More money, less annoying interruptions, and usually there is time for my derrière to hit a chair at some point.

Carry on.

So, show me on Mr. Teddy where in the head you were injured...

LDAthleteNurse, BSN, RN

Specializes in Labor and Delivery.

Everyone one keeps saying that MSNs, CRNAs, and FNPs are going to flood the market, but does anyone have any hard numbers? To me, my BSN is a means to an end. I in no way want to be at the bedside for my whole career, so I am about 98% sure I will be going back. I'm 23 now and hope to be done with school completely by the age of 30.