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Calling all nurses, do not get scammed by this phone call.

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Julie Julie (Admin)

Specializes in Sm Bus Mgmt, Operations, Planning, HR, Coaching. Has 39 years experience.

kbrn2002, ADN, RN

Specializes in Geriatrics, Dialysis. Has 19 years experience.

I've been getting these scam calls for years. Personally I find them kind of funny. My call screening blocks them but they occasionally leave voicemails that are so over the top threatening that I am amazed people fall for it. But since they keep calling enough people must fall for the scam to keep it profitable so they continue calling. You'd think though that they would eventually give up calling the same number so many times when they get zero response from that person.

I never answer any number I don’t know. If it’s important, they can leave a message.

Jory, MSN, APRN, CNM

Has 10 years experience.

It blows my mind in this day and age that anybody falls for these scams. If you have a question, call the BON yourself.

ruby_jane, BSN, RN

Specializes in ICU/community health/school nursing. Has 12 years experience.

1 hour ago, Jory said:

It blows my mind in this day and age that anybody falls for these scams. If you have a question, call the BON yourself.

Me too, but this is a conversation I have with my mom at least yearly. At least she's started to forward or read me the emails....

KCMnurse, BSN, MSN, RN

Specializes in Educator. Has 37 years experience.

Scammers are getting creative - we have to be vigilant. If I don't know the number I don't answer, if it's important they will leave a message.

Every once in a while, I get in a mood to just mess with them. I kept "Apple support" on the phone for 15 minutes the last time. Even after that 15 minute conversation, they couldn't tell me what type of apple I was eating nor where my apple tree was 🤣

So far I haven't received one of these calls. I doubt I would fall for it because I distrust every call from a stranger I get.

The article is vague on what exactly the nurse thought she was supposed to be paying for. If it's just a generic debt, it's pretty far fetched to think you could lose your license for this. This nurse sounded pretty gullible-"I dont know, I just believed what they were telling me." Okay, well...

Glad she got it sorted out in the end.

I had a scammer call and demand I make a payment on my student loan. I’m 64 years old. That was amusing.

2 hours ago, jobellestarr said:

I had a scammer call and demand I make a payment on my student loan. I’m 64 years old. That was amusing.

There likely are some people that age who still have student debt.

My granddaughter is in the process of cleaning up her credit. She played a voicemail for me that stunk of scam. She is still ready to jump at CALLING and TALKING to this jerk so she can send him a money order in the deluded belief that will help her cause. I still have not convinced her that the call is a scam. Her mother came closer to convincing her and I still have to play some Dave Ramsay videos on the topic, but thank goodness she has put it off for now. Imagine not caring to get something in writing or interacting with someone that refuses to legally validate the “debt”.

kbrn2002, ADN, RN

Specializes in Geriatrics, Dialysis. Has 19 years experience.

8 hours ago, caliotter3 said:

My granddaughter is in the process of cleaning up her credit. She played a voicemail for me that stunk of scam. She is still ready to jump at CALLING and TALKING to this jerk so she can send him a money order in the deluded belief that will help her cause. I still have not convinced her that the call is a scam. Her mother came closer to convincing her and I still have to play some Dave Ramsay videos on the topic, but thank goodness she has put it off for now. Imagine not caring to get something in writing or interacting with someone that refuses to legally validate the “debt”.

That's unfortunate and I think a little rare. Seems like it's not as common for the younger generation to get fooled by a debt scam. Hopefully she does listen to you and Mom instead of calling this person back. After all, if it is a legitimate debt she should have something in writing and if she really wants to contact the real debtor there would be contact information in the letter.

CelticGoddess, BSN, RN

Specializes in Palliative, Onc, Med-Surg, Home Hospice. Has 6 years experience.

On 3/5/2020 at 9:43 AM, ihavealltheice said:

Every once in a while, I get in a mood to just mess with them. I kept "Apple support" on the phone for 15 minutes the last time. Even after that 15 minute conversation, they couldn't tell me what type of apple I was eating nor where my apple tree was 🤣

My husband played stupid when they called about windows (We are an all Mac family). He had the phone on speaker and it was all I could do to not laugh. THe caller was getting more and more frustrated and my husband keeps asking them what type of windows, are they energy efficient, etc. The guy finally cussed out my husband and hung up. We were both laughing hysterically.

2 hours ago, kbrn2002 said:

That's unfortunate and I think a little rare. Seems like it's not as common for the younger generation to get fooled by a debt scam. Hopefully she does listen to you and Mom instead of calling this person back. After all, if it is a legitimate debt she should have something in writing and if she really wants to contact the real debtor there would be contact information in the letter.

I think it is either a straight up scam or a very slim chance at a situation where a collection agency is using "tactics" to fool her into sending money. She is dealing with a collection agency that refuses to communicate with her regarding her request for financial assistance regarding medical debts arising from hospital visits where the hospital has already written off her charges according to their charity system. If the agency would say, in writing, too bad that the hospital wrote off your debt, we own the doctor debt and we demand you pay it, that is one answer. Or they could also forgive the debt. But to send absolutely nothing by mail and this mysterious voice mail talking about "my client" "this matter", WTH? Dave Ramsay, from what I can tell, gives an approach to deal with collectors who won't cooperate. Ultimately, if there is a refusal to even communicate, then don't pay anything. If it shows up on credit report, dispute it with the credit bureau. My daughter is in a hurry to send money to anybody who demands it. She has not noticed that none of the creditors she has already paid have removed anything from her credit report as a reward for finally paying IN FULL. I don't know what she thinks this stranger, who refuses to even identify the "client" is going to do for her, besides to cash the money order! Grandma advises, so must do the opposite. Kind of like talking to some baby nurses: experienced nurse gives solid experienced-based advice, insult them on a public website. So why did you ask? Same general idea.

VivaLasViejas, ASN, RN

Specializes in LTC, assisted living, med-surg, psych. Has 20 years experience.

I'm another person who doesn't answer the phone when I don't recognize the number. I don't even hit the "decline" button--I let it go through to voicemail. I figure if it's really important, or if it's a real call, they'll leave a message. Naturally, this is hardly ever the case. I also block repeat callers. It doesn't solve the whole robo-call problem, but I don't get a lot of these calls anymore.

On 3/5/2020 at 10:59 PM, Kooky Korky said:

There likely are some people that age who still have student debt.

That would be very sad

kbrn2002, ADN, RN

Specializes in Geriatrics, Dialysis. Has 19 years experience.

16 hours ago, caliotter3 said:

I think it is either a straight up scam or a very slim chance at a situation where a collection agency is using "tactics" to fool her into sending money. She is dealing with a collection agency that refuses to communicate with her regarding her request for financial assistance regarding medical debts arising from hospital visits where the hospital has already written off her charges according to their charity system. If the agency would say, in writing, too bad that the hospital wrote off your debt, we own the doctor debt and we demand you pay it, that is one answer. Or they could also forgive the debt. But to send absolutely nothing by mail and this mysterious voice mail talking about "my client" "this matter", WTH? Dave Ramsay, from what I can tell, gives an approach to deal with collectors who won't cooperate. Ultimately, if there is a refusal to even communicate, then don't pay anything. If it shows up on credit report, dispute it with the credit bureau. My daughter is in a hurry to send money to anybody who demands it. She has not noticed that none of the creditors she has already paid have removed anything from her credit report as a reward for finally paying IN FULL. I don't know what she thinks this stranger, who refuses to even identify the "client" is going to do for her, besides to cash the money order! Grandma advises, so must do the opposite. Kind of like talking to some baby nurses: experienced nurse gives solid experienced-based advice, insult them on a public website. So why did you ask? Same general idea.

I kind of hated to "like" that because it's such a frustrating situation I am sure. The hospital might very well have sold the debt to a third party collector. There's a difference in writing off the debt and forgiving the debt. Written off debt can be passed off to a collection agency.

Even if it stems from a legitimate debt though the collection agency that bought it doesn't sound at all legitimate by the way they are contacting her. A collection agency is required to identify themselves every call and inform that any information they receive is an attempt to collect a debt. They have to provide their name, identification number and company contact information as well as the name of the original creditor on request. They also have to stop calling and communicate only by mail if they are told to .

Sadly I am afraid if she gives this outfit any money it'll probably be gone with the wind. If she won't take Grandma's advice as least ask her to do a little research on how legal debt collection works so she can make a more informed decision before she sends these people money. If she still decides to pay them at that point if it does turn out to be a collection scam at least she's young enough to financially recover and she will learn a very valuable lesson. I doubt she'd fall for that a second time and there probably will be another try. Those fake debt collectors live in a small world too, once they hook a fish they will probably go back and try for more.

You know it is really very sad. Nobody taught me one thing about financial literacy. I had to learn on my own. Both her mom and I gave her the rundown on credit cards and such when she opened the accounts. So what did she do anyway? Yet who does she come to for money, and help? But it has to be on her terms. I got more thanks and respect from young soldiers coming to me for advice when they found themselves out in the world confronting adulthood. Family lets it go in one ear and out the other. Time to send to the curb as they say.