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KCMnurse BSN, MSN, RN

Registered Nurse
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  1. I am by no means an expert and your legal counsel is your best advocate in this situation. I seriously doubt that you can walk away from this situation unscathed. You will have to explain first and foremost why you went to see your abuser when you no longer lived there. Proof of DV will have to be more than pictures of things he broke. You will need police reports, pictures of your injuries, medical reports, etc... But to answer your question - it depends. Generally, the BON is not swift so your license may remain unscathed for a while. In which case I suggest you stash as much cash as possible. Also, make sure that your lawyer has experience and expertise in dealing with licensure and the BON. I wish you the best.
  2. This case intrigued me. Let me know what you think regarding the decision to fish wasted tablets out of the sharps container... https://www.nurse.com/blog/2019/03/13/court-rules-with-board-of-nursing-on-spilled-pills-case-against-nurses/
  3. KCMnurse

    Bringing infant on job search...

    I completely understand where you are coming from. I have been in that position where we moved to a new location, I knew no-one and was job searching. I applied for one position and they called me in to interview. I explained I would need to arrange childcare and I would be available the following week. They told me to come in and bring the baby too - they were desperate! Fortunately, my daughter slept though the whole thing and I was hired on the spot. One the other hand, I have interviewed applicants that brought their children along (without prior notice or permission) it did not end well for them. So unless your potential future employer specifically says it is OK - don't bring your kids along with you.
  4. KCMnurse

    DWI Felony & Licensure

    I believe you can self report in most states. Since you already know what is headed your way, the sooner you start on the monitoring program the faster you are out. Better to self-report than wait for the letter from the BON.
  5. KCMnurse

    Where to start?

    lawyer up and get a drug test ASAP - urine and hair!
  6. KCMnurse

    Thumbs down button?

    I can't find it - maybe that's a good thing!
  7. KCMnurse

    I Lost My Baby And My Phone!

    Thanks for sharing your story - a reminder that patients are people first.
  8. KCMnurse

    The Culture of Nursing

    After 30 years - I still have that same respect
  9. Where do I begin? I have been following this site for years and it has been a source of both comfort and anxiety. I have been a nurse for over 30 years. I was working as a Nursing Director for a non-profit organization supporting adults with intellectual disabilities. I had worked there for several years but the stress was taking its toll, so I decided to move on to something less stressful. A full two months after I left, I received a letter from the board of nursing stating that there was a complaint against my license. I was almost physically sick as I read page after page of allegations of neglect, poor judgment, failure to follow nursing standards -the list went on. To be honest I could not believe what I was reading, much less begin to understand where all this was coming from. Many of the complaints were about areas that I was not even responsible for. The letter gave me 10 days to respond to the allegations. My first instinct was to get a lawyer; I let my husband talk me out of it. He was convinced, as I was, that I simply had to respond to the allegations and they would go away. HOW WRONG I WAS!! Foolishly I thought that if I simply explained what really happened the situation would be resolved. I submitted my carefully crafted response and waited for the board to exonerate me. After four months with no response, I contacted the board to find out what the status of the complaint was. After some transfers, I was informed by the board's lawyer that they were moving forward with disciplinary action. I did not know what to say or do - I was in complete shock. I managed to ask what recourse I would have, I was told that I would be able to request a settlement hearing once I was formally notified of my charges. I immediately contacted a lawyer. BEST MOVE I MADE. She carefully reviewed the information and submitted a letter to the board that all further communication was to come through her. I then sat and waited for nine long months for the formal charges. I prayed, worried, stressed, and cried my way through those months. If it had not have been for the support of my husband I would not have made it through the whole ordeal. Finally, I received an email outlining the charges - all eleven of them. I was devastated, but once I got myself together I sat down and carefully read them. Charge, after charge I had clear evidence to refute. I contacted my lawyer who had already requested a settlement hearing. I went over the charges and my evidence to refute the charges. She spent two days carefully crafting a response to each allegation and attaching supporting evidence. The settlement hearing came a month later - I can't explain how I felt looking into the faces of the board members and explaining complaint after complaint. I was an exemplary nurse, who had never had a bad report or performance evaluation and here I was practically begging for my license. The board had not conducted ANY type of investigation, had not contacted my former employer, requested records, or interviewed me -NOTHING! It took all of 30 minutes and I was dismissed to wait for their decision. Later that afternoon, I got the best phone call from my lawyer, all charges were dropped - case closed. That's it - it was finally over. Needless to say this has left a bad taste in my mouth. The board could just as easily have taken my livelihood away from me without doing their due diligence. Looking back I am so disappointed in an entity that supposedly is in place to protect the public yet failed to conduct a proper investigation on allegations that turned out be completely false.
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