Are there any travel nurse jobs for Unvaccinated Nurses?

Updated | Posted
by Heart Attack Zack Heart Attack Zack, BSN, RN (New) New

Specializes in CCRN. Has 3 years experience.

unvaccinated-nurse-looking-travel-job.jpg.f1ead3a5d18f7ffafc186dd36ef96aca.jpg

I have two years of ICU experience, and the past 18 months of that have been in a COVID-ICU. I had a severe allergic reaction to my first dose of moderna (major swelling of my face and tongue with extreme difficulty breathing. I rode via ambulance to the ER while breathing through an NPA). None of my doctors recommend me getting the second dose/booster. As much as I would like to be fully vaccinated, after being hospitalized and almost getting intubated from the first dose, it’s simply not worth the risk for me. I am healthy, young, and already had Covid before my first dose. Despite all of this, my hospital denied my medical exemption and fired me two weeks ago. This whole situation stinks, but I’m moving forward so....

I would like to start travel nursing, but I’m not sure if there are positions available for unvaccinated nurses. Any help is appreciated. Thank you.

Guest219794

Guest219794

2,453 Posts

Well in the three years since your one solitary post, this whole vaccination thing has become a real hot topic here.  Welcome back.

I would expect you would get better information from a travel recruiter, wouldn't you?

Emergent, RN

Specializes in ER. Has 29 years experience. 2 Articles; 4,012 Posts

Yeah, bringing up the 'V' word here at this site will just attract an angry mob. Don't waste your time. 

Sorry about your reaction. I had a severe reaction to Moderna  myself,  but not as bad as you describe. Good luck. Exemptions are being granted at some hospitals, I know of a couple. I think the rural,  critical access ones might be your best bet.

 

Tweety, BSN, RN

Specializes in Med-Surg, Trauma, Ortho, Neuro, Cardiac. Has 30 years experience. 31,851 Posts

Most of the hospital systems here in Tampa Bay don't require vaccinations.  This is Florida after all.  

Not sure when and if the Biden rules are going to take affect, so you'd better hurry.

We are currently done with the delta surge and covid hospitalizations are low, but there still might be a need for travel nurses, I don't know.

Edited by Tweety

mmc51264, ADN, BSN, MSN, RN

Specializes in orthopedic; Informatics, diabetes. Has 10 years experience. 3,100 Posts

We are so short staffed because of post-Covid burnout. It is going to take a while to recover. The omnicron variant seems to not cause more hospitalizations, but our hospital is full and not too many Covid cases. 

MunoRN, RN

Specializes in Critical Care. Has 10 years experience. 8,058 Posts

I know of a nurse who found a job at a facility that doesn't require vaccination, although supposedly she's making $15 an hour with no housing stipend.  (It's a job she had to travel to but not through a travel nurse agency).  This was before the requirement for CMS-participating hospitals went into effect, so it would seem unlikely you'll find much now.

I think it's reasonable to consider alternatives for those who have legitimate medical contraindications, but your hospital denied you a medical exemption because you don't have a valid medical exemption.  Even a severe reaction to the first dose does not predict a reaction to subsequent doses.  

 

Guest219794

Guest219794

2,453 Posts

OP- did you make any decisions?

Did you contact a travel agency?

The good news is that any if there are places that don't require vaccinations, chances are they are either overwhelmed now, or will be when Omicron get's into full swing.  Between the surge in patients, and nurses getting sick, there should be a high demand for travel.

 

HiddencatBSN

HiddencatBSN, BSN

Specializes in Peds ED. Has 11 years experience. 594 Posts

My hospital had a program that gave second doses slowly over an hour and monitored closely for reactions for those who had a reaction to the first dose but wanted to be fully vaccinated. I’m surprised that wasn’t more widespread.

klone, MSN, RN

Specializes in OB-Gyn/Primary Care/Ambulatory Leadership. Has 16 years experience. 14,293 Posts

17 hours ago, Tweety said:

Not sure when and if the Biden rules are going to take affect, so you'd better hurry.

They have been challenged by several courts and haven't held up. Many health systems are capitulating. 

Guest219794

Guest219794

2,453 Posts

Zack- what happened?

But- how is the search?  Travel money is great right now, and with 2 years ICU, you can probably pay off those student loans.  Maybe Nebraska?

Legitimate medical issues like yours are extremely rare, with most un-vaccinated nurses  choosing to be un-vaccinated based on either political/philosophical reasons, or having done their own research.  Point being, while you are the rare exception, there are plenty of others in your position, looking for work.  And, like I said, killing it (metaphorically) with travel contracts.

I am curious about the treatment for your reaction:  I have managed anaphylaxis, angioedema, allergic reactions of all sorts in the ER.  Never used, or heard of using an NPA.  Anybody close to that level of concern got tubed, with consideration for a trach. What was the course of treatment, and the diagnosis?  Do they think it was the vaccine itself, or maybe a component like a preservative that might be in other vaccines?  Will you be able to get other vaccines now?  Super interested to hear.  We do vaccination clinics, and haven't had one severe reaction, despite giving thousands of shots.  

 

LibraSunCNM, MSN

Specializes in OB. Has 10 years experience. 1,608 Posts

16 hours ago, HiddencatBSN said:

My hospital had a program that gave second doses slowly over an hour and monitored closely for reactions for those who had a reaction to the first dose but wanted to be fully vaccinated. I’m surprised that wasn’t more widespread.

How does this work?  You have a needle in your arm for an hour?  

macawake

macawake, MSN

Has 14 years experience. 2,141 Posts

6 hours ago, hherrn said:

I am curious about the treatment for your reaction:  I have managed anaphylaxis, angioedema, allergic reactions of all sorts in the ER.  Never used, or heard of using an NPA.  Anybody close to that level of concern got tubed, with consideration for a trach. What was the course of treatment, and the diagnosis? 

Hmm.. Like you I’ve never seen one used in a hospital for anaphylaxis but I can perhaps see it being an option in the field/pre-hospital if the swelling of the tongue and face from the angioedema is bad enough to make the mouth difficult to open/access. It can be done with the patient sitting up which might be helpful.  Hardly a long-term solution, but a temporary one. Unless the airway improves they’ll likely need an endo- (or naso-) tracheal intubation or a tracheotomy.