How To Answer The Most Common Nursing Interview Questions - page 5

To be perfectly blunt, interviews can be rather nerve-wracking because a lot is at stake. After all, you really want to be considered for this available position, and you only have one chance to make... Read More

  1. Visit  corissahawley profile page
    0
    Hi, I am a CNA and I have my first interview ever on Tuesday. I have a job now but I didn't have a formal interview for it so this one will be a first and I am so nervous. Any help and advise would be great. Thanks!
  2. Visit  RNsteve profile page
    0
    Second interview in month...
    First rejected with a response that I they would welcome me to reapply after gaining 6-12 months acute care experience. Kinda stuck in long term care position(charge RN, with level 3\4 residents) at the moment, in a small community where I'm simply not at all happy.
    Stressed. 2+ years experience, and feeling like I'm a disadvantage to even newgrads.
  3. Visit  middleagednurse profile page
    1
    Corissa. Google the place where you will interview so you will know something about the place. Dres professionally. No jeans, flip flops, dont wear a lot of jewelry or makeup. Smile and be polite and friendly.
    corissahawley likes this.
  4. Visit  RunBabyRN profile page
    1
    I haven't read through the responses, so this may be repetitive, but I wanted to add a few questions I've had recently:

    Describe a time when you had conflict with a manager/coworker/patient/family member and how you resolved it. What was the outcome?

    How do you manage your stress?

    Give an example of how you've handled a high stress situation.

    Have you ever worked nights? Would this be a struggle for you? (for NOC position)

    Give examples related to our values (pt safety, advocacy, stewardship, etc.) that you've performed in patient care.

    What are your favorite patients? Least favorite?

    In asking them questions, the manager today LOVED when I asked what changes have been happening recently in the unit. It was good to know what was up!
    tricia74832 likes this.
  5. Visit  goodman1507 profile page
    0
    Nice article
  6. Visit  jan286 profile page
    0
    At the end when you have the opportunity to ask questions, some of my nursing instructors said to ask about the turn-over rate on the unit and the reasons for it (termination, promotion etc)...I feel like that is not a good question to ask. What are your thoughts? Also, would it be ok to ask about patient:nurse ratios?
  7. Visit  TheCommuter profile page
    0
    Quote from jan286
    At the end when you have the opportunity to ask questions, some of my nursing instructors said to ask about the turn-over rate on the unit and the reasons for it (termination, promotion etc)...I feel like that is not a good question to ask. What are your thoughts? Also, would it be ok to ask about patient:nurse ratios?
    I would definitely ask about nurse/patient ratios.

    Asking about unit turnover rates might be an exercise in futility because I'm sure a desperate interviewer would downplay this information or be evasive when answering.
  8. Visit  Amnesty profile page
    0
    Quote from BrandonLPN
    WHATEVER you do, don't say something like "I'm a workaholic." or "I'm too much of a perfectionist."

    We do "team interviews" where I work, and I've sat in on a few where the interviewee said something like this. I always want to roll up a magazine and bop them on the head.
    Now see, I get apprehensive about this because I don't have a lot of big flaws (that I know of!), and being a perfectionist is definitely the biggest one I have. However, I've heard that interviewers are tired of hearing "non-flaws" worded as flaws, especially the workaholic/perfectionist one. So what in the hell am I supposed to say?? I mean, being a perfectionist isn't a flaw per se but it's something that needs work. It makes me very wary of group work, more rigid, and more anxious in general. Those aren't good things.
  9. Visit  BrandonLPN profile page
    0
    Quote from Amnesty
    Now see, I get apprehensive about this because I don't have a lot of big flaws (that I know of!), and being a perfectionist is definitely the biggest one I have. However, I've heard that interviewers are tired of hearing "non-flaws" worded as flaws, especially the workaholic/perfectionist one. So what in the hell am I supposed to say?? I mean, being a perfectionist isn't a flaw per se but it's something that needs work. It makes me very wary of group work, more rigid, and more anxious in general. Those aren't good things.
    Be honest.

    OK.... honest-ish..... it IS an interview.

    Frame it as a personal flaw that you learned to overcome, thus making you a better employee.

    Maybe your flaw is (was) difficulty being in a position of authority. Maybe you never had a job where you had to delegate tasks, so being a LPN in charge of a hall of CNAs was a challenging experience in your first nursing job. Go on to describe how you worked on building relationships and establishing trust and made the care your residents you received your ultimate priority. And you learned how to be a leader through a relationships based on trust and respect.

    something like that sounds better than the old "I'm a perfectionist" line.
  10. Visit  dah doh profile page
    1
    Good post! I personally hate when a candidate says "I'm a perfectionist" as their weakness! At that point, you just lost my vote!

    Look at yourself honestly and give an honest answer about what you need to work on. Most new grads need to work in delegating tasks, communication with doctors and families, work on how you deal with stressful situations, death & dying, etc. Those are just a few of the more neutral but decent answers...but be honest because it will show unless you're a really good liar!
    tricia74832 likes this.
  11. Visit  Cfishe13 profile page
    0
    Hi I have interview for charge nurse post in icu, I already work on unit and have been doing acting charge nurse post for a year. I'm looking for ideas for a question to ask panel at end of interview. thanks in advance
  12. Visit  toERortonot profile page
    0
    i had to answer all sorts of situational questions during my screening with human resource. this wasn't my first interview, so i knew how to play that game. my next interview was with the directors of 3 departments... they were grilling me about nursing related scenarios. seriously, FILL IN THE BLANK~! uh, HELLO, new graduate here? the NCLEX was a breeze compared to this. i got the job, but i walked out of there feeling like i needed return to nursing school
  13. Visit  TheCommuter profile page
    0
    Quote from toERortonot
    i had to answer all sorts of situational questions during my screening with human resource. this wasn't my first interview, so i knew how to play that game. my next interview was with the directors of 3 departments... they were grilling me about nursing related scenarios. seriously, FILL IN THE BLANK~! uh, HELLO, new graduate here? the NCLEX was a breeze compared to this. i got the job, but i walked out of there feeling like i needed return to nursing school
    I think scenario questions are the most difficult because they require the interviewee to globally analyze the situation and formulate a good response based on the details they were given.

    Anyhow, thank you for sharing your experience.

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