RPN/LPN/RNA all the same???

  1. 0 I've been looking for information on nursing and the different levels of nursing. I'm getting a little confused. Are RPN/LPN/RNA all the same??? Also, I heard from a friend that Practical Nursing is going to be phased out in Canada and everyone's going to have to be trained as an RN as of 2010. Is this true??? Any info will be great!
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  3. Visit  willow2004 profile page

    About willow2004

    From 'Ontario'; 31 Years Old; Joined May '08; Posts: 2.

    85 Comments so far...

  4. Visit  TheCommuter profile page
    0
    RNA = Restorative Nursing Assistant; basically, the RNA is a nursing assistant with additional training and/or certification. The RNA is not a licensed nurse.

    The RPN in Ontario is equivalent to the LPN in the US and other parts of Canada.
  5. Visit  loriangel14 profile page
    1
    Some parts of Canada refer to LPNs as RPNs. They are the same. RNA designation does not exist anymore. They are not phasing them out at all.Recently the RPN scope was expanded as well as the education. My program was 5 semesters and would take 2.5 years to complete. In my area RPNs are used in almost all areas except CCU and ICU and there are plenty of jobs. I have a former classmate that works in the ER.
    RNs are now required to have their BSN in Ontario for licensure and I think other provinces are heading that way as well.
    willow2004 likes this.
  6. Visit  wtbcrna profile page
    0
    Quote from willow2004
    I've been looking for information on nursing and the different levels of nursing. I'm getting a little confused. Are RPN/LPN/RNA all the same??? Also, I heard from a friend that Practical Nursing is going to be phased out in Canada and everyone's going to have to be trained as an RN as of 2010. Is this true??? Any info will be great!
    You will occassionally see RNA used for Resident Nurse Anesthetist vs SRNA.
  7. Visit  suzanne4 profile page
    0
    But this thread is concerning Canada and they do not use CRNAs there.
  8. Visit  Silverdragon102 profile page
    1
    sure in one of the provinces RPN is psychiatric nurse?

    Types of nurses
    Registered nurse (RN).
    Licensed practical nurse (LPN) or licensed vocational nurse (LVN), known as registered practical nurse (RPN) in Ontario.
    Registered psychiatric nurse (RPN) - are licensed to practice only in British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, and the territories.

    Wiki Nurse
    willow2004 likes this.
  9. Visit  linzz profile page
    0
    I would say first off that RPN's in Ontario are not required to become RN's by 2010. The RN program is now a four year BSN program for RN licensure. RN's graduating before 2005 have been grandfathered. As mentioned, the RPN program is now 2.5 years long and has a very wide scope. Due to the shortage of RN's, most hospitals will likely hire a lot more RPN's especially the diploma RPN's with a year or two of experience.
  10. Visit  asoonernurse profile page
    0
    I disagree, Lori. Here in the U.S., the LPN is, in fact, being "phased out" of the acute care setting, which is unfortunate, but happening nonetheless. I would bet my last that it won't be long before Canada follows.

    Regards,

    Michael


    Quote from loriangel14
    Some parts of Canada refer to LPNs as RPNs. They are the same. RNA designation does not exist anymore. They are not phasing them out at all.Recently the RPN scope was expanded as well as the education. My program was 5 semesters and would take 2.5 years to complete. In my area RPNs are used in almost all areas except CCU and ICU and there are plenty of jobs. I have a former classmate that works in the ER.
    RNs are now required to have their BSN in Ontario for licensure and I think other provinces are heading that way as well.
  11. Visit  futurecnm profile page
    0
    Quote from unitek1963
    I disagree, Lori. Here in the U.S., the LPN is, in fact, being "phased out" of the acute care setting, which is unfortunate, but happening nonetheless. I would bet my last that it won't be long before Canada follows.

    Regards,

    Michael
    what actions are being taken to phase out LPN's? I know they are hired somewhat less in hospital settings but there are still many working around where I am. And there are still LPN programs. If they are truly phasing them out, why are there still schools for LPN? I just finished an RN program so it doesn't affect me directly but I think it has been something people have been saying for years and I still see plenty of LPN's.
  12. Visit  Fiona59 profile page
    3
    Quote from unitek1963
    I disagree, Lori. Here in the U.S., the LPN is, in fact, being "phased out" of the acute care setting, which is unfortunate, but happening nonetheless. I would bet my last that it won't be long before Canada follows.

    Regards,

    Michael
    This question is aimed at Canadians to answer. The employment and education of nurses up here is very different to that of the US.

    The CNA is looking at having the PN become the entry level of nursing up here, with nursing education being laddered from PN-RN-MSN-PhD.

    Our basic course for a PN is a miniumum of four college semesters and includes the first year arts completed by BScN students.

    While your input is welcome, I really doubt that most American posters have the knowledge to comment on nursing in Canada.

    To put it bluntly, if my province did "phase" out LPNs, they would be short roughly 4,500 acute care NURSES.
  13. Visit  Silverdragon102 profile page
    0
    Moved to the Canadian forum for further input
  14. Visit  NotReady4PrimeTime profile page
    1
    There was an attempt in the early 90's to phase out the LPN in Manitoba. It wasn't the success they expected and they had to backpedal a lot. As fiona59 says, the current plan is to make the LPN the bottom rung on the nursing ladder, with the BScN then the MScN and PhD above.
    Fiona59 likes this.
  15. Visit  linzz profile page
    1
    I would say that RPN employment in hospitals may vary depending on the area, but it is unlikely they will be phased out in Ontario or anywhere where the BSN is the requirement for RN licensure because it would cause a huge shortage. Most provinces in Canada will not allow RPN or RN education to be done by any private colleges, at least not in Ontario and this is turn reduces the number of seats in government funded colleges. In addition, RPN's have a fairly wide scope if they are diploma grads which includes initial assessments, IV starts and monitoring, catheters and on and on. That said, I have to say that there are far more opportunities for RN's.
    Fiona59 likes this.


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