Jump to content

Why be a floor nurse when they don't care?

Posted

in the last newsletter for our nursing unit it read that they will be removing chairs/terminals per "upper management and the expectation is that RNs should chart in patient rooms or in the "hallways" with very limited dedicated space for charting at a workstation...in a time where nurses are stressed, overworked, and facing so many challenges I am surprised Legacy Health, one of Oregon's largest hospital systems is doing this to their beloved RN heroes.... I guess we are not so respected and beloved...and I guess none of them have worked 12 hours straight running their tail off taking care of sick people and cannot realize the importance of focused charting and some time to rest our feet. 

Besides the reality that sick patients do not want an RN charting in their patient room for an extended period of time...when a nurse is in the room they expect you to be providing care not typing and disturbing them for over 5 minutes.

Is this really true Upper Management? Is this what you want for your RNs and patients?

first no N-95 masks for RNs in the beginning of the pandemic and now take away our chairs and ability to chart and rest for a few minutes.....

Pathetic really and embarrassing that any professional would accept this type of treatment, we need to do something. Unacceptable.

 

ClaraRedheart, BSN, RN

Specializes in Med-Surg. Has 6 years experience.

Just curious what happens if you spend 12 hours running on all cylinders and need to sit and chart after shift because you couldn't stop? Where do you chart? I guess I'd have to see the plan to judge fully. My nursing unit does not have more than two chairs at some charting areas. We try to save the two chair areas for someone who might be precepting. Other than that, there are plenty of  single chairs and computers in the hallway right outside of the patients rooms and we mostly either chart on those, or in the patients rooms.

What I've found, is that I prefer to chart in my patients rooms. It only takes an extra 7-10 minutes, but if there isn't a bonafide emergency in the next room that I need to get to, it's more efficient because I'm not stuck charting at the end of the day. I learned that quick when I went from nights to days... you pretty much HAVE  to chart as you go or  you're staying late 1-2 hours . I don't like that, and management doesn't like paying for that overtime. I'd rather someone's sprite to be 7 minutes late  because I finished charting in their neighbors room.

Pandemic nursing presents new challenges. Lately, I have found that I'm running from one room to attend to either an emergency, or a through the roof blood pressure, 10/10 pain or Q2 turn on 4/5 patients because our easy patients are gone. Days like that, I have had to stay late and chart and I would be mad as all getout to not have a chair to sit in while I did so.  

Edited by ClaraRedheart

fibroblast

Has 5 years experience.

And if you sit too long in the room the patient may ask you for ice or fluff their pillows. I love doing things for my patients, but I 'don't' like it when administration doesn't allow me to take care of my patients. This is a one way ticket out of  nursing field if this doesn't stop. 

Edited by fibroblast

amoLucia

Specializes in LTC.

As I recall not so long ago, there was a very similar post re Admin removing chairs from the nsg station. It also forced nurses to do their charting standing up.

The process did NOT go over WELL, to say the least. I don't remember for sure, but I think that debacle fell by the wayside.

 

Tweety, BSN, RN

Specializes in Med-Surg, Trauma, Ortho, Neuro, Cardiac. Has 28 years experience.

Nurses don't need to be treated as "beloved heroes".    But we should be respected.

I try to chart in rooms as much as possible.  For example, I dump a foley, take out an IV, do a dressing change, etc. I chart it then and there.  When I get a post op patient while doing frequent vital signs I will chart in the room, or when giving blood I will chart in the room.  But often with five head to toe assessments to chart, I need to move on to the next thing and chart that later.  I'm not going to go back to the patients room and say "excuse me but management says I'm to chart about you in the room" and finish charting.

Some of our floors have chairs that attach to the computers for the nurses to use in the hallway, but my floor doesn't so I'm guessing it's an individual manager's choice.  But many of us are able to chart in the nurse's station and our manager doesn't seem to mind.  It's more important that we do bedside shift change report and hourly rounding in her eyes than if during a 12 hour shift we sit down to chart.  

I feel for you. You've seen behind the curtain.

12 hours ago, NursesDontNeedChairstoChart12hrShift said:

I am surprised Legacy Health, one of Oregon's largest hospital systems is doing this to their beloved RN heroes.... I guess we are not so respected and beloved

No you aren't beloved and you never were. You are not thought of as a hero by them, either, and never were.

 

12 hours ago, NursesDontNeedChairstoChart12hrShift said:

I guess none of them have worked 12 hours straight running their tail off taking care of sick people and cannot realize the importance of focused charting and some time to rest our feet. 

Even if they did run like that they would think it's just fine for them to have a chair and you not to.

 

12 hours ago, NursesDontNeedChairstoChart12hrShift said:

Besides the reality that sick patients do not want an RN charting in their patient room for an extended period of time...when a nurse is in the room they expect you to be providing care not typing and disturbing them for over 5 minutes.

This is a weak argument.

Actually, there is no argument that is worth your breath. It will only blacken your soul if you try to argue with unthinking narcissists.

It is really incredible for this change to happen during covid if for no other reason than the fact that there are other points in history where this in-room agenda might have been more appropriate; now is not it. Get in and get out. The good news is that blatantly illogical moves like this let everyone know where things stand.

You need your Plan B pronto (in case there's any confusion I'm not talking about a better chair argument, I'm talking about how you are going to take abuse and negativity and turn it into something positive for yourself). 

Don't waste your breath and your words and your emotions.  Assimilate this information (from your recent epiphany) so you don't waste years grieving over something that never was. Get a plan and start executing it.

💮👍🏽

 

At my facility we're billed as part of the furniture (we come with the room) soon we'll BE the furniture! 😄

cynical-RN, BSN

Specializes in ICU. Has 10 years experience.

I feel sorry for night shift nurses typing in the room every 2 or 4 hours and the patients who need to rest/sleep. Sleep is a significant variable in the continuum of wellbeing for patients. This is quite an imprudent move from the powers that be.

ruby_jane, BSN, RN

Specializes in ICU/community health/school nursing. Has 10 years experience.

I can only infer that this newsletter was written by someone who hasn't actually charted on a patient in years.....

Common trend of management to break up the central nurses station, lessens opportunities for us to gather and think as a group....you see this same thing in newly built hospitals where they have "pods" and no central nursing station, you can go entire shifts without seeing 90% of the other nurses on your shift...true or not, just my thought

It’s threads like this that make me thankful for where I work.  I don’t chart in patient rooms.  Plus, we don’t chart in real time.  I write all my stuff down then when I’m done passing morning meds I go and chart at the nursing station.  By the time I get done with all of that it’s time for my noon assessment and meds.  

CKPM2RN, ASN, EMT-P

Specializes in Emergency/Med-Tele. Has 3 years experience.

When I work on the the floor  I have a difficult time doing any charting in the rooms because we have our computers attached to the wall by an articulating arm which neither goes up high enough for me, nor stays up without sinking back down to the lowest level. I have to either kneel or squat on the floor or bend over at an odd angle to type. It makes it really difficult and uncomfortable. 

 

Emergent, RN

Has 27 years experience.

The ideal set up is to provide a variety of spaces, for a temperamentally diverse workforce. 

The charting procrastinators like to sit and chart, after the fact. Others like to get their charting out of the way in real time. Still others use a mix of these methods. Also, some shifts are steady, and others are full of drama and crises. When you have a shift where you are frantically trying to keep your patient alive, you have to chart after the fact.

A one-size-fits-all approach is never the best way.

 

I don’t want to chart where the patients can see me.

They’ll start making busy work for me.

What's the rationale for this? 

 

To stop nurses spreading COVID among themselves?