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Which position would be better?

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Specializes in Med-Surg, Oncology, OB, School Nurse. Has 29 years experience.

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I have two job offers from two different places and I'm not sure which would be better.

First: Night shift, less pay and better benefits, 40 min commute, less turnover

Second: Day shift, more pay, 20 min commute, more turnover

The first job I'm concerned about the nights and a 40 min drive home. In the past when I've done nights I've been so exhausted I'd fall asleep at stop lights. I also would wake up after about four hours and not be able to go back to sleep and have a bad headache the rest of the night. That was many years ago so maybe it would be different now???

However the second place is notorious for being short staffed with a higher turnover and Dr's get away with yelling at the nurses a lot. ( I have friends who work here and this is what they tell me. ) However I know I'd handle the day shift better and the shorter commute would save me a lot of time. 

I currently work M-F but I'm bored and need a change and hate the five days a week. I'm always tired after work and don't feel like doing anything. Weekends I'm busy catching up on everything so I never feel like I get a real day off. I don't HAVE to change or do anything though but I get excited over the thought of something new and only working 3 days a week. 

Any suggestions or advice? Thanks!

NurseLy, BSN, RN

Specializes in Med surg. Has 4 years experience.

Personally, I could put up with some less than ideal stuff for straight days and a 20 minute commute. Those are high priorities for me. 

On 9/5/2021 at 9:46 PM, RatherBHiking said:

The first job I'm concerned about the nights and a 40 min drive home. In the past when I've done nights I've been so exhausted I'd fall asleep at stop lights. I also would wake up after about four hours and not be able to go back to sleep and have a bad headache the rest of the night. That was many years ago so maybe it would be different now???

Just from my personal experience.  In May, I went back to PT nights, even though I had difficulty working nights before, but I thought things would be better.  I found I cannot tolerate working nights and being 5 years older didn’t help.  The headaches, nausea, inability to sleep more than 4 hours during the day got to be too much, and tomorrow is my last day at this job.  There is just not enough money (for me) to make nights worth it. 
 

Goody luck in your decision! 

Been there,done that, ASN, RN

Has 33 years experience.

Could never handle night shift. The circadian rhythm change messed me up.  20 minute commute and dayshift is good . Doctors cannot yell at you. You will be okay... just yell back.

 Peace.

EDNURSE20, BSN

Specializes in ED, med-surg, peri op. Has 4 years experience.

Both options don’t sound good. Nights and a 40 min commute, or a terrible work environment where you are short staff and have rude drs  

Personally I would keep looking. If your biggest problem is being bored at your current job, I’m sure you can stick it out a bit longer till something better comes along. 

RNperdiem, RN

Has 14 years experience.

How about option 3: Stay with your dull but low stress day job for now while applying for other nursing jobs. Those two choices don't sound appealing at all. Hold out for something better.

9 hours ago, RatherBHiking said:

In the past when I've done nights I've been so exhausted I'd fall asleep at stop lights. I also would wake up after about four hours and not be able to go back to sleep and have a bad headache the rest of the night

Re-read this yourself, or read it as though a friend thinks it's a good idea.  Alternately, go for a night hike three nights in a row 40 minutes from your house, then see how you feel.  Then, take into account instead of hiking, you will be working inside in a stuffy environment surrounded by peers eating junk food.

 

9 hours ago, RatherBHiking said:

However the second place is notorious for being short staffed with a higher turnover and Dr's get away with yelling at the nurses a lot.

Short staffed for a reason.

And- if doctors are actually yelling at nurses, this is a bizarre and toxic environment.  In 17 years, I have never seen this.  I have heard of nurses who say they are yelled at, but have never seen/heard a doctor yelling at a nurse.

 

Jedrnurse, BSN, RN

Specializes in school nurse. Has 29 years experience.

Don't pick either job. Stay where you are until you find a better option.

RatherBHiking, BSN, RN

Specializes in Med-Surg, Oncology, OB, School Nurse. Has 29 years experience.

1 hour ago, hherrn said:

And- if doctors are actually yelling at nurses, this is a bizarre and toxic environment.  In 17 years, I have never seen this.  I have heard of nurses who say they are yelled at, but have never seen/heard a doctor yelling at a nurse.

I’ve experienced this many times, as well as many nurses in this area, at all three hospitals in our town. I don’t mean a Dr getting irritated but full out screaming as his (always a he) face is red and people stop and stare. It’s better than it was 20 yrs ago and at some you can file a workplace harassment form but consider yourself lucky it has never happened to you or even seen it. The third place I didn’t apply to I was told in an interview once our Dr’s are professional and don’t yell. Yet I saw it almost every day and was reamed out myself by a surgeon for holding a case up and it wasn’t even my fault. One also liked to throw instruments like scalpels across the room one one tech got hit and they still let him practice. I quit that job. 
 

Thanks for the insight.  We don’t have great choices of hospitals to work at in my area. 😕

Davey Do

Specializes in around 25 years psych, 15years medical. Has 42 years experience.

Advice: Bloom where you're planted.

2 hours ago, hherrn said:

I have heard of nurses who say they are yelled at, but have never seen/heard a doctor yelling at a nurse.

Ditto.

Sometimes I think yelling refers to not having properly walked on eggshells when speaking to a nurse.

 

5 hours ago, EDNURSE20 said:

If your biggest problem is being bored at your current job, I’m sure you can stick it out a bit longer till something better comes along. 

Kind of my thought, too.

Not sure but this sounds like a move from outpatient to acute care? If so, this is one heck of a time in history to decide that outpatient is too boring--and not just because of covid, either.

RatherBHiking, BSN, RN

Specializes in Med-Surg, Oncology, OB, School Nurse. Has 29 years experience.

This is why I wanted advice. I’ve learned when it comes to oneself you don’t always see the forest because of the trees. I know I wasn’t seeing everything clearly due to emotions. My outpatient job isn’t boring in the fact I’m not constantly busy, just in the fact it’s tedious, same old thing, no longer a challenge etc. I was excited to make a change and actually get offers but it’s starting to sound like I’m exchanging one set of problems for another. Thanks for your advice!