Jump to content

What is the proper way to address an RN?

Posted

You are reading page 3 of What is the proper way to address an RN?. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

BuckyBadgerRN, ASN, RN

Specializes in HH, Peds, Rehab, Clinical. Has 4 years experience.

I'd probably die laughing if someone called me Nurse Smith

Fiona59

Has 18 years experience.

Do American patients actually know their nurses surname/family name, whatever is politically correct?

It's a huge security issue in my region. It doesn't even appear on ID cards anymore. Just Christian/first name, rank/designation, barcode, and health service ID number (which is so small I can't see it without bifocals)

amoLucia

Specializes in retired LTC.

I used to work with a CNA who emigrated from Africa somewhere. He used to call me "Sister". It was the weirdest thing and I was uncomfortable with it. I would try to subtlely correct him, but no go. Finally we discussed it together. Turns out it was a title of respect and honor for a superior level professional in his country.

I used to feel like a nun, but once I understood...

Fiona59

Has 18 years experience.

"Sister" is still used in the UK and much of the Commonwealth.

I've been called "Sister" by doctors and patients.

I used to work with a CNA who emigrated from Africa somewhere. He used to call me "Sister". It was the weirdest thing and I was uncomfortable with it. I would try to subtlely correct him, but no go. Finally we discussed it together. Turns out it was a title of respect and honor for a superior level professional in his country.

I used to feel like a nun, but once I understood...

It really IS a throwback to when most of the nurses people saw were nuns, or volunteers through a convent or religious order. Ah, good times.....

BuckyBadgerRN, ASN, RN

Specializes in HH, Peds, Rehab, Clinical. Has 4 years experience.

I always introduce myself as "Susan". I don't WANT my last name known to everyone, hence my choosing to just have my last inital on my name badge.

That Guy, BSN, RN, EMT-B

Specializes in Emergency/Cath Lab. Has 6 years experience.

Lately its been "Hey *******". I think they didn't hear my name right but oh well

labordude, BSN, RN

Specializes in L&D, OBED, NICU, Lactation. Has 15 years experience.

I can't recall ever introducing myself to someone as anything other than "My name is ..., I'll be your baby's nurse for this shift." I do get called "Nurse (myname)" by many families and by other nurses who are introducing me to the families..."hey, Nurse (me) is here, he's awesome."

labordude, BSN, RN

Specializes in L&D, OBED, NICU, Lactation. Has 15 years experience.

I don't call physicians "Doctor" because they make me. I call them Doctor out of respect.

Do you also request the same respect from them?

I treat everyone with courtesy and for those who earn it with their actions, respect.

I included these definitions because it's how I differentiate between the two (as does the American Heritage Dictionary). In my mind, the two are not the same and should not be used interchangeably.

courtesy n. Polite behavior; gracious manner or manners. --- [

respect n. 1. Deferential or high regard; esteem. 2. respects. Expressions of consideration or deference ; pay one's respects. 3. A particular aspect; detail. 4. Relation; reference; with respect to his request.

-v. 1. To have esteem for. 2. To avoid violation of. 3. To concern. [

Caffeine_IV

Specializes in LTC, med/surg, hospice. Has 7 years experience.

Patient use my first name if they can remember it or either just say nurse. I generally will write my name on the whiteboard during bedside report.

It is usually said wrong.

I don't mind being called "nurse" or "miss" but I HATE when people call me girl or little girl simply because I look young to them.

TakeTwoAspirin, MSN, RN, APRN

Specializes in Peri-op/Sub-Acute ANP.

Do you also request the same respect from them?

I treat everyone with courtesy and for those who earn it with their actions, respect.

I included these definitions because it's how I differentiate between the two (as does the American Heritage Dictionary). In my mind, the two are not the same and should not be used interchangeably.

courtesy n. Polite behavior; gracious manner or manners. --- [

respect n. 1. Deferential or high regard; esteem. 2. respects. Expressions of consideration or deference ; pay one's respects. 3. A particular aspect; detail. 4. Relation; reference; with respect to his request.

-v. 1. To have esteem for. 2. To avoid violation of. 3. To concern. [

No, I don't request the same from them. I earn the same from them.

subee, MSN, CRNA

Specializes in CRNA, Finally retired. Has 49 years experience.

I don't call physicians "Doctor" because they make me. I call them Doctor out of respect.

And we don't deserve the same respect? If a 30 year old doctor wants to address 65+ me by my first name and insists that I call him "doctor", then I'm feeling dissed. He/she can call me Ms.___, but not by my first name like I'm the maid in an old movie:).