What is the proper way to address an RN?

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Specializes in HH, Peds, Rehab, Clinical. Has 4 years experience.

I'd probably die laughing if someone called me Nurse Smith

Fiona59

8,343 Posts

Has 18 years experience.

Do American patients actually know their nurses surname/family name, whatever is politically correct?

It's a huge security issue in my region. It doesn't even appear on ID cards anymore. Just Christian/first name, rank/designation, barcode, and health service ID number (which is so small I can't see it without bifocals)

amoLucia

7,735 Posts

Specializes in retired LTC.

I used to work with a CNA who emigrated from Africa somewhere. He used to call me "Sister". It was the weirdest thing and I was uncomfortable with it. I would try to subtlely correct him, but no go. Finally we discussed it together. Turns out it was a title of respect and honor for a superior level professional in his country.

I used to feel like a nun, but once I understood...

Fiona59

8,343 Posts

Has 18 years experience.

"Sister" is still used in the UK and much of the Commonwealth.

I've been called "Sister" by doctors and patients.

RNsRWe, ASN, RN

4 Articles; 10,428 Posts

I used to work with a CNA who emigrated from Africa somewhere. He used to call me "Sister". It was the weirdest thing and I was uncomfortable with it. I would try to subtlely correct him, but no go. Finally we discussed it together. Turns out it was a title of respect and honor for a superior level professional in his country.

I used to feel like a nun, but once I understood...

It really IS a throwback to when most of the nurses people saw were nuns, or volunteers through a convent or religious order. Ah, good times.....

Specializes in HH, Peds, Rehab, Clinical. Has 4 years experience.

I always introduce myself as "Susan". I don't WANT my last name known to everyone, hence my choosing to just have my last inital on my name badge.

Specializes in Emergency/Cath Lab. Has 6 years experience.

Lately its been "Hey *******". I think they didn't hear my name right but oh well

Specializes in L&D, OBED, NICU, Lactation. Has 17 years experience.

I can't recall ever introducing myself to someone as anything other than "My name is ..., I'll be your baby's nurse for this shift." I do get called "Nurse (myname)" by many families and by other nurses who are introducing me to the families..."hey, Nurse (me) is here, he's awesome."

Specializes in L&D, OBED, NICU, Lactation. Has 17 years experience.
I don't call physicians "Doctor" because they make me. I call them Doctor out of respect.

Do you also request the same respect from them?

I treat everyone with courtesy and for those who earn it with their actions, respect.

I included these definitions because it's how I differentiate between the two (as does the American Heritage Dictionary). In my mind, the two are not the same and should not be used interchangeably.

courtesy n. Polite behavior; gracious manner or manners. --- [

respect n. 1. Deferential or high regard; esteem. 2. respects. Expressions of consideration or deference ; pay one's respects. 3. A particular aspect; detail. 4. Relation; reference; with respect to his request.

-v. 1. To have esteem for. 2. To avoid violation of. 3. To concern. [

Caffeine_IV

1,198 Posts

Specializes in LTC, med/surg, hospice. Has 7 years experience.

Patient use my first name if they can remember it or either just say nurse. I generally will write my name on the whiteboard during bedside report.

It is usually said wrong.

I don't mind being called "nurse" or "miss" but I HATE when people call me girl or little girl simply because I look young to them.

Specializes in Peri-op/Sub-Acute ANP.
Do you also request the same respect from them?

I treat everyone with courtesy and for those who earn it with their actions, respect.

I included these definitions because it's how I differentiate between the two (as does the American Heritage Dictionary). In my mind, the two are not the same and should not be used interchangeably.

courtesy n. Polite behavior; gracious manner or manners. --- [

respect n. 1. Deferential or high regard; esteem. 2. respects. Expressions of consideration or deference ; pay one's respects. 3. A particular aspect; detail. 4. Relation; reference; with respect to his request.

-v. 1. To have esteem for. 2. To avoid violation of. 3. To concern. [

No, I don't request the same from them. I earn the same from them.

subee, MSN, CRNA

4,405 Posts

Specializes in CRNA, Finally retired. Has 51 years experience.
I don't call physicians "Doctor" because they make me. I call them Doctor out of respect.

And we don't deserve the same respect? If a 30 year old doctor wants to address 65+ me by my first name and insists that I call him "doctor", then I'm feeling dissed. He/she can call me Ms.___, but not by my first name like I'm the maid in an old movie:).