What is the proper way to address an RN?

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Specializes in SICU, trauma, neuro. Has 16 years experience.

Generally first name, sometimes pts/fam call me "Nurse" or "Miss," occasionally "Ma'am" if they forget my name.

RNsRWe, ASN, RN

4 Articles; 10,428 Posts

I'm guessing by now the OP knows that "anything goes"!

I've been called by my first name if they manage to remember it, "Miss" or "Nurse" if they can't.

Where I work now, it's commonplace to be addressed as "Ma'am", as in "Yes, Ma'am", "No, Ma'am" and "Excuse me, Ma'am" :)

Specializes in ICU. Has 30 years experience.

We introduce ourselves by our first names to our patients. I don't really like this, and would much prefer to be called Ms. Soandso. It makes me feel like a servant for someone several decades younger than me to call me by my first name, but I have to call them Mr., Mrs., or Ms. We aren't "allowed" to call patients by anything but their title and last name. But I am also from that bygone era....

Has 33 years experience.

I always introduce myself to my patients by my first name, therefore most of them use that to get my attention. I agree few patients use the title "nurse" before talking to me. Few can distinguish a nurse from a tech, even though we have dress codes where the nurses always have white pants whereas the tech dress in navy.

amoLucia

7,735 Posts

Specializes in retired LTC.

Back in the dinosaur days, some old time doctors would use the "Nurse amoLucia" route. Always sounded funny to me.

And then we were always expected to properly address our elders as a sign of respect. Today, I'm one of the elders!

Fiona59

8,343 Posts

Has 18 years experience.

Up here, we introduce ourselves by our Christian names. We are not permitted to use our surnames on the floor for security reasons.

Some remember our names, most just call us "Nurse".

My family however when they call ask for "Nurse Surname" but then they are all either in the military, police, or retired from those jobs. They see it as a rank and use it as, now that I think of it, so do our military patients. But hey, I live in a garrison town with a large population of retired and serving military members.

RNsRWe, ASN, RN

4 Articles; 10,428 Posts

Up here, we introduce ourselves by our Christian names.

Well I guess I can't work there, LOL....:woot:

dudette10, MSN, RN

1 Article; 3,530 Posts

Specializes in Med/Surg, Academics. Has 12 years experience.

You may call me Mistress Medgiver. Thank you.

Fiona59

8,343 Posts

Has 18 years experience.
Well I guess I can't work there, LOL....:woot:

Semantics, I'm old. H e l l, I have a Hindu co-worker, who has said "My Christian name is xxxx". Which has led to several educational conversations.

RNsRWe, ASN, RN

4 Articles; 10,428 Posts

Semantics, I'm old. H e l l, I have a Hindu co-worker, who has said "My Christian name is xxxx". Which has led to several educational conversations.

LOL.....have also been told that I'm "a good Christian woman" :) For THIS particular person, I was comfortable saying "Actually, I'm a good JEWISH woman" and she thought for a minute and said "No, I still say you're a good CHRISTIAN woman"....LOL, no idea why she said that except that maybe she just wanted to make sure I recognized the compliment :D

Has 18 years experience.

I introduce myself with my first name to my residents/patients and staff. I don't mind them calling me by my name only. I have one staff member that refers to me as Miss Wanda. :)

Farawyn

12,646 Posts

Has 25 years experience.

My old coworker insisted on being called Mrs. Lastname. I am Firstname to my patients. Or hey you, Nurse, yadda yadda...

I am the school nurse at my kids' high school right now and a lot of their friends call me Nurse Mom. I love dopey boys.