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Webcams in Nursing Homes?

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traumaRUs has 27 years experience as a MSN, APRN, CNS and specializes in Nephrology, Cardiology, ER, ICU.

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Are Webcams the Wave of the Future?

As our population ages, our older and frailer population increases too. What's a family to do to ensure their family members are cared for in a compassionate and caring manner? You are reading page 2 of Webcams in Nursing Homes?. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

vampiregirl has 9 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Hospice.

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Like several other posters, my concerns lie in ensuring patient dignity (in some cases both the targeted patient and the roommate) and how the video footage would be used/ who has access to it. 

This is yet another area where technology has progressed faster than regulations and legalities can be addressed/ implemented. So many different aspects - both positive and negative. It will be interesting to see what the future brings in this area. 

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21 hours ago, JKL33 said:

I see this two ways. A room in these facilities constitutes a person's home. To the extent that they can have a camera on themselves without violating other residents' rights in their homes, they should be allowed to do so.

OTOH, I do have a problem with the idea of filming the work of the employees when so very much of what they are able to do or not do is dictated by someone else. Even the amount of time that they have to spend with a resident is dictated by constraints that are far, far out of their control. If the argument is that their work directly affects the residents and therefore is "fair game," then the conference and board rooms could also be fair game--with far greater effect toward the overall good. I honestly don't know why we don't wise up as a society and start demanding serious accountability from the people who control the resources, instead of attempting to pick apart individual people who look like the problem but are not the problem--those who have zero control over the resources.

 

I have never understood this line of thinking. It just isn't reality.  If it were, no one would ever have a story made up about them or a lie told or a misperception reported or an exaggerated complaint leveled. That isn't even to mention the human factor and the idea that people are not perfect and essentially no one deserves to have their non-abusive/non-problematic imperfections scrutinized for someone else's heavy-handed purposes.

I might feel differently if LTC workers had adequate power/resources to work through (defend) relatively minor complaints leveled against them instead of just preparing to be terminated -- but they have no power so it's completely moot.

Patients with cognitive deficits have absolutely no power. 

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Orion81RN has 7 years experience.

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On 9/24/2019 at 4:48 PM, brownbook said:

My grandson is special needs and has care givers. His mom mentioned the idea of a web cam in their home. She said if you don't trust the care givers, think you need a web cam, you need to hire different care givers. 

I understand that, but we see horrible videos on the Internet of abuses!

I don't know what I'd do.

I do private duty nursing. You simply can never know who you can trust. I WANT a camera *recording* in a patient's home, with our knowledge, not hidden. I believe that protects the employees as well from unfounded accusations, which happens more frequently than I care to think about, unfortunately. 

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1 hour ago, Queen Tiye said:

Patients with cognitive deficits have absolutely no power. 

No disagreement there. I trust you understood my point anyway. There are diminishing returns associated with picking the least powerful employees out of a large power structure and pretending that those people are the ones who must make good from others' wrongs, or that they are the main problem when things go wrong.

What sense does it make to film workers (such as bedside caregivers) when someone else has already made the decisions that dictate every other thing that happens?

But the point I was getting at even more is that this "if you aren't doing anything wrong" line of thinking is nonsensical when applied to people who are starting from a position of such serious disadvantage. They cannot come close to doing everything right for everyone all the time. They can do their best, but someone is bound to not be happy with that.

 

33 minutes ago, Orion81RN said:

I believe that protects the employees as well from unfounded accusations, which happens more frequently than I care to think about, unfortunately. 

I do think that was true for awhile. I knew a manager who would use data from staff tracking devices to refute patient complaints about how they "didn't see a nurse the entire time I was there," etc. But now everyone is so reticent to contradict a customer that facts matter very little way too much of the time, and we're left with the ways these things are actually used, which is as efficiency trackers and the like.

So what about situations where the complaint (seen on camera) is that "no one has been in mom's room for ____ hours." These types of negligence complaints are directly tied to help and resources. Yes, there could be a lazy worker who doesn't go in the room...but there could also be an excellent worker who literally cannot do the amount of work assigned - - and the employee has no way to really prove which of those two they are: They are what the boss makes them out to be when the [] hits the fan.

Edited by JKL33

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Hoosier_RN has 20 years experience as a MSN and specializes in LTC, home health, hospice, ICU, ER, dialysis.

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7 hours ago, Orion81RN said:

I believe that protects the employees as well from unfounded accusations, which happens more frequently than I care to think about, unfortunately. 

Too many accusations of abuse, which later turn out to be unfounded. I think this could help 

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I honestly don't feel that my cognitively impaired grandson's  parents need one in their home. It's a case by case issue. 

Webcams, and cell phones, have caught so many incidents involving workers in fast food restaurants, police interactions,  criminal activity, nursing home  abuses, etc.

Webcams might help improve patient care and  provide proof if allegations are made against staff.

Prominent signs where there is a camera should be mandatory.

It's kind of scary, gives meaning to It's A Brave New World.

22 hours ago, vampiregirl said:

Like several other posters, my concerns lie in ensuring patient dignity (in some cases both the targeted patient and the roommate) and how the video footage would be used/ who has access to it. 

This is yet another area where technology has progressed faster than regulations and legalities can be addressed/ implemented. So many different aspects - both positive and negative. It will be interesting to see what the future brings in this area. 

 

Edited by brownbook

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traumaRUs has 27 years experience as a MSN, APRN, CNS and specializes in Nephrology, Cardiology, ER, ICU.

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On 9/25/2019 at 7:44 AM, NICU Guy said:

We have NICview available for 75% of our patients (NICU environment, not SNF). Parents who sign up get a computer generated username (color animal number, ex. PurplePanda16)) and a password. Camera is always on, except during patient care. It reduces the frequencies of phone calls about the status of their baby, but there are the occasional "the pacifier is out of his mouth, can you put it back in". Camera is focused exclusively on the baby and not the environment.

What a great option for parents who can't visit too. I live near a tertiary medical center with many "feeder hospitals" in very rural areas where there is no transportation. If the parents can't be present frequently, this would provide at least some interaction. 

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SmilingBluEyes has 20 years experience.

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I don't have a problem with working with a cam in the room. But I also believe staff definitely need to be informed of use of such tools.  I do nothing that would be trouble, caught on camera. But people have the right to know when they are being recorded.

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Glycerine82 has 3 years experience as a ASN, LPN and specializes in SNF/Rehab/Geri.

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If this were common practice they'd eventually have to provide us with appropriate staffing, which will be fought tooth and nail. 

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1 hour ago, Glycerine82 said:

If this were common practice they'd eventually have to provide us with appropriate staffing, which will be fought tooth and nail. 

I was thinking/hoping the same. Cameras will prove how difficult basic daily patient care is, especially in understaffed  skilled nursing facilities. Local and state governments and agencies won't be able to claim they had no idea how bad it was. 

"Some say I'm a dreamer" 😢.

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traumaRUs has 27 years experience as a MSN, APRN, CNS and specializes in Nephrology, Cardiology, ER, ICU.

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On 9/30/2019 at 9:50 PM, SmilingBluEyes said:

I don't have a problem with working with a cam in the room. But I also believe staff definitely need to be informed of use of such tools.  I do nothing that would be trouble, caught on camera. But people have the right to know when they are being recorded.

Exactly. I have had patients and families want to record me and while I have no issue with this if they let me know, its an invasion of my privacy to record me without my knowledge. To clarify - this is in a clinic where there would be the opportunity to overhear other pt/provider interactions. If they wish to record a conversation with me, I would want it to be private so that I could ensure other pts' privacy

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On 9/27/2019 at 9:03 AM, JKL33 said:

No disagreement there. I trust you understood my point anyway. There are diminishing returns associated with picking the least powerful employees out of a large power structure and pretending that those people are the ones who must make good from others' wrongs, or that they are the main problem when things go wrong.

What sense does it make to film workers (such as bedside caregivers) when someone else has already made the decisions that dictate every other thing that happens?

But the point I was getting at even more is that this "if you aren't doing anything wrong" line of thinking is nonsensical when applied to people who are starting from a position of such serious disadvantage. They cannot come close to doing everything right for everyone all the time. They can do their best, but someone is bound to not be happy with that.

 

I do think that was true for awhile. I knew a manager who would use data from staff tracking devices to refute patient complaints about how they "didn't see a nurse the entire time I was there," etc. But now everyone is so reticent to contradict a customer that facts matter very little way too much of the time, and we're left with the ways these things are actually used, which is as efficiency trackers and the like.

So what about situations where the complaint (seen on camera) is that "no one has been in mom's room for ____ hours." These types of negligence complaints are directly tied to help and resources. Yes, there could be a lazy worker who doesn't go in the room...but there could also be an excellent worker who literally cannot do the amount of work assigned - - and the employee has no way to really prove which of those two they are: They are what the boss makes them out to be when the [] hits the fan.

A nurse I talked to recently said she had one aide for 30 patients, many of which were incontinent.  How do you keep 16 or so people clean and dry or feed 10?  Someone will be getting cold food or sit in urine for awhile.  That is a sad reality.

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