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Too old to go into nursing??

st431 st431 (New) New

Hello everyone!

I recently found out that I was accepted into Drexel's 24 month ACE nursing program. I am very excited and proud of my accomplishments so far but I fear that I may be too old for a career change. When I enter the program I will be one month shy of 41 and when I graduate I will be 43 (YIKES!). Here are some of my main issues. First of all am I too old? Also, will I be able to find a job after graduation? I am shelling out a lot of money for this program and have a lot of anxiety. I know the 24 month program is still fairly new however does anyone on here have an experience with the program? If so would you be able to share some information that would help put my mind as ease. For example, is the program manageable? I have trolling this site for months and have seen so many negative posts about Drexel and it is really starting to scare me. If anyone could help it would be wonderful.

WinterLilac

Specializes in Psychiatric.

Go for it!!! :yes: My mum did her 18month LPN (EN in Australia) and finished it when she was 65 years old. She had absolutely no problem getting work because she was enthusiastic and thorough. She took great pride in being an LPN and ensured she did everything by the book and to the benefit of the patient. You will be so proud of yourself for doing the course and the time is going to pass anyway so you might as well spend it educating yourself to get a profession. Let your teachers know you are nervous and ask if you could check in with them regularly for their feedback, advice and direction. You may need to do a short course on using Micrsoft Word and writing essays but once you get the hang of it you'll be fine. Also, as you progress through the course you may discover a specialty of nursing you are interested in as there are so many to choose from. Good luck!!!

RN or LPN?

I do not have experience with your particular program but I can help put your mind at ease regarding age. I was the second oldest student in my LPN program. I graduated at 40. The oldest started at 47. After we all got to know each other we both took on a leadership role within our group of 20somethings.

It's somewhat a struggle to find your first nursing job. Some people are lucky but for most it takes time. You WILL have to apply everywhere. You do have to be persistent. It is what it is.

43 for me was young. In fact I went back to nursing at 43 after 10 years off as a SAHM. Now almost 10 yrs back in and I have about 15 years left to practice my trade. Your chronological age wouldn't be a major factor as far as entering nursing but your physical age could be.

What I would be focusing on is the job market, ability to make the payments on a large loan and paying too much on a for profit program.

Edited by Libby1987

ThePrincessBride, BSN

Specializes in Med-Surg, NICU.

At 43, you potentially have 20+ years of working ahead of you. You can have a great career in that time frame.

Also, if 43 was too old for change we wouldn't have Wendy's (Dave Thomas was very old when he started the franchise), Game of Thrones (the first book was published in 1996 when George RR Martin was 48 years old) and many people have gone to even more intense training (such as med school and residency) at later ages.

43 is the new 33.

NurseGirl525, ASN, RN

Specializes in ICU.

I think as long as you take care of yourself and don't come across as "old" which I don't think at 43 you will. I'm graduating in May and I am 40. But you would never guess I'm 40. I have some very good genes, but I also take care of myself. Moisturizer is seriously my best friend. My hair is cut nicely and I have good stamina. I run and work out.

I also already have a job when I graduate and pass NCLEX. If this school is a for profit school, you may run into problems finding a job. Most hospitals want you to graduate from a nationally accredited school. Most of those schools are not. They will tell you they are, but they lie. Their admissions officers are used car salesman who will lie to you about their product to make the sale. Remember that. They are shady salespeople.

Do your own research and make a smart decision when deciding on a school. This is an investment in your future. It makes no sense to pay more for your education than you will get back in pay. Nursing wages are decent, but you aren't making so much that taking on the debt of what a house is worth. You would have an additional house payment each month. That's a lot of money.

I think as long as you take care of yourself and don't come across as "old" which I don't think at 43 you will. I'm graduating in May and I am 40. But you would never guess I'm 40. I have some very good genes, but I also take care of myself. Moisturizer is seriously my best friend. My hair is cut nicely and I have good stamina. I run and work out.

I also already have a job when I graduate and pass NCLEX. If this school is a for profit school, you may run into problems finding a job. Most hospitals want you to graduate from a nationally accredited school. Most of those schools are not. They will tell you they are, but they lie. Their admissions officers are used car salesman who will lie to you about their product to make the sale. Remember that. They are shady salespeople.

Do your own research and make a smart decision when deciding on a school. This is an investment in your future. It makes no sense to pay more for your education than you will get back in pay. Nursing wages are decent, but you aren't making so much that taking on the debt of what a house is worth. You would have an additional house payment each month. That's a lot of money.

I don't know much about their nursing program, but Drexel is a reputable university in general.

Hello everyone!

When I enter the program I will be one month shy of 41 and when I graduate I will be 43 (YIKES!).

How old will you be in two years if you DON'T go to nursing school?

You have an amazing opportunity in front of you. Go for it.

CrunchRN, ADN, RN

Specializes in Clinical Research, Outpt Women's Health.

How much money?

Yes, how much money? Is there a community college or state school available?

CalicoKitty, BSN, RN

Specializes in Med-surg.

I got pretty much what I expected when I went through Drexel's ACE program (1 yr). When I took the NCLEX, I was sure I passed (I checked with the Pearson trick anyway). Drexel focuses a lot on the test.

For clinical time, I felt a little "unprepared". I'm not sure how the 24 mo program would differ from the 1 year program. I think more clinical time could have been better (but really hard to fit into the schedule). Some schools offer a "capstone" or final practicum where they pretty much learn how to do hospital nursing (the other clinical stuff seemed more theory).

I graduated when I was 36, so a little younger, but not significantly. You've still got 20+ years of work to look forward to! And with nursing, it is really easy to get flexible jobs (think working a day or two every few weeks into retirement just for more spending money).

Getting a job isn't always easy. I'd seriously advise finding a new-grad position in a hospital that includes a good amount of training. (My hospital has a year-long program, with 3 months of training for med-surg and more for ED and ICU). They are becoming more common.

A Bachelor's will make it easier to get a job in a hospital, but other things like previous experience will help, too (especially medical stuff). There are jobs out there. But, Philly has a pretty high amount of new grads getting pushed out annually, so first jobs may require more distance. There are hospitals in the greater Philadelphia area, but also, hospitals in NJ, DE and MD (each state requires a separate license since PA is not a compact state).

After your initial job, there's so many different nursing areas you can work. So, if one type of job isn't what you want, you can try other stuff.

Yes, Drexel is expensive. :D

lifelearningrn, BSN, RN

Specializes in School Nursing.

So you can turn 43 without a shiny, new hard earned nursing degree or you can turn 43 and be doing something amazing. Why not go with the latter?

FTR- I was 39 when I got into nursing school, and 41 when I graduated. I had similar misgivings.. I don't regret doing it for one second!

djh123

Specializes in LTC, Rehab.

I don't know anything about Drexel, but I got my BSN at 54... shoulda been a year or two earlier, but there was a bump or two along the way. So I'm crazy, and you're definitely not too old. (And there were 2 others in my class who were my age). So put one foot in front of the other...

I am 47 and just got accepted into our Nursing Program here in Wyoming and I am on the Bachelor tract!! I say "GO FOR IT"! You can do what ever you set your mind to do. At an older age it is a bit more difficult to learn but definitely not impossible.

The accomplishment alone will be very rewarding.

:)

If this program is expensive, I would check a community college. I am so cautious about student loans! I see them crippling people financially. I have no idea what kind of money this program costs. You are not too old though! Regardless of age I would just be conservative about the cost.

You are not too old. I had a classmate who was in her early 50s.

nrcnurse

Specializes in hospice.

I had a mid-life crisis at 47 and left my corporate job. I worked as a CNA, graduated from LPN school at 49, RN at 51, BSN at 55. I am now experiencing my two-thirds-life-crisis at 60, and working as a traveller. Too old? Hogwash. Best decision you'll ever make.

I had the same concerns as you and I am so happy that I made such a career change at my age!! I was raising my three small children when I decided to go to nursing school! I took ONE prerequisite a semester for 12 years while raising my babies and finally graduated at 50 years old!! Your never ever too old to start a new dream....just do it!!!

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