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The Sad Truth: Version 2.0

Published

Specializes in Long Term Care, ER, and Education. Has 7 years experience.

I recently wrote an article about my experience on attempting to find a nursing instructor position at a traditional four year university. The school I attended was called into question, because it was unknown to a member of the hiring board. You are reading page 2 of The Sad Truth: Version 2.0. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

Jules A, MSN

Specializes in Family Nurse Practitioner.

*Hmmm - maybe someday, when I'm in my dotage, strapped to my assisted-living Segway I'll be ready to drone on about nursing theory to a gaggle of disinterested students . . . nah, what am I thinking.

Lol, as God is my witness this chick will be retiring at a respectable age when I'm still lucid enough to realize that my game is slipping and it will definitely be before the segway with attached oxgen tank comes into play. :D

tacomaster

Specializes in ninja nursing.

The only people needing DNPs are for people high up on the education food chain like deans and chancellors. Seriously, they don't have enough nursing instructors as it is now. If you've got your Masters, you can teach BSN students at any four year university in Texas. Plus, they have an amazing state retirement for when you are eligible for retirement. Stick with it.

LadyFree28, BSN, RN

Specializes in Pediatrics, Rehab, Trauma. Has 10 years experience.

Version 2.0 wasn't necessary. Version 1.0 completely covered the issue.

Moving on.

Wonder why this wasn't posted in the other forum...

Anywho, ignore me splitting hairs, and move right along...

;)

explorereb96, ADN, BSN

Specializes in Pediatrics Telemetry CCU ICU. Has 34 years experience.

It makes a difference if this candidate was told that his degree held no merit. I agree that if that is in fact why they did not hire you, it is discriminatory. That being said, the sad truth is that it isn't covered by any known entity, law, or regulation. There is no law that states "we will not discriminate due to age, sex, color, race, creed, religion and an online degree from an unknown university." they have that right, I suppose, but would you want to work with these individuals anyway or for a university that condones that? Hell, if they offered me a free ride scholarship, I would turn it down. Look, we all know what went on there. They are looking for one of their own to keep the family together. Incest... yep you are correct. That does not make it an excellent program, it makes it a suspect one. In my world an equal degree would mean that you are in the running. After an interview, you will have to "show me" "impress me," In other words, each candidate will get 1/2 day to show me how they would run their area. Compensation for that time would be minimum wage. Then there would be a second interview with the other staff in attendance. You are right, its not right, its unethical, and its immoral but its not illegal.

TheCommuter, BSN, RN

Specializes in Case mgmt., rehab, (CRRN), LTC & psych. Has 15 years experience.

There is no law that states "we will not discriminate due to age, sex, color, race, creed, religion and an online degree from an unknown university."
Exactly.

For instance, the restaurant chain Hooters won't be hiring me into a waitstaff position anytime soon because my appearance isn't what they're seeking (read: my boobs aren't big enough and my tummy isn't flat enough). However, no laws are in existence to prevent employers from discriminating against body types that deviate from the ideal standard of beauty.

Some types of discriminatory actions are lawful. Employers can choose to reject applicants who are too short, too tall, too smelly, too underweight, too overweight, too tattooed, too toothless, or any number of non-protected reasons.

emmasuern

Specializes in Clinical Research. Has 10 years experience.

I was going to post on the original and time got away from me. I did my AS at a community college in my hometown. My RN-BSN was online. We did have clinical hours for that degree. My MS is from a state school that is very well known and the courses were online. No one has ever questioned me about whether the coursework was online or in a classroom.

I'm going back for my PhD this year. The two programs I applied to are online. They both have a requirement to spend a week on campus every year. The rest is online. They are both very well known state schools. I am sure that I will have no problem obtaining a job.

I always say I want to teach. I currently work in research (the focus of my MS degree). I've applied for teaching positions and haven't heard a thing. I will most likely end up working in research on the sponsor side. I'm okay with that. It's a lot more money. I can guarantee you that I won't be turned away because my PhD was done with an online format. They are going to look at my years of working in research. I worked with someone from a big device company. She was told she had to have a doctorate to keep her job. They didn't even care what the degree was in. Her manager told her it could be in underwater basket weaving. Once you have a specialty a company will overlook things like where you obtained your degree.

I've had many jobs I was rejected from in the past. Looking back I always had something better come up. Hopefully, you will be able to say the same thing a year down the road.

To the OP,

I apologize if between your first article on this subject, and now, on your second, I have missed information where you stated that you formally applied for a specific teaching position with a bricks and mortar university. In your first article you stated that you were told you wouldn't be hired to teach nursing by the university you mentioned, as your degree was obtained online, but as you didn't state that you actually applied for a teaching position and were formally rejected, I am unclear about why you perceive you have been unfairly excluded for employment teaching nursing with this university. Again, I apologize if I missed information you provided later in the threads in regard to your having formally applied for a teaching position.

Edited by Susie2310

TheCommuter, BSN, RN

Specializes in Case mgmt., rehab, (CRRN), LTC & psych. Has 15 years experience.

*shaking head* OP seems intelligent & motivated - wonder why she wants to dive into "academentia" *shudder*.
Not that it should matter or anything like that, but the OP is a 'he,' not a 'she.'

TexMex22

Has 30 years experience.

Quote from roser13

Version 2.0 wasn't necessary. Version 1.0 completely covered the issue.

Moving on.

Wonder why this wasn't posted in the other forum...

Anywho, ignore me splitting hairs, and move right along...

;)

No kidding. Nothing like beating it to death. :dead:

Edited by TexMex22
misquote

ParkerBC,MSN,RN, PhD, RN

Specializes in Medical Surgical/Addiction/Mental Health.

Canwil2082-

Thanks for sharing your experience. Each person's experience adds value and it is your truth. I am currently in a BSN to PhD program. At first, I applied to and was accepted into a nurse practitioner track. After taking nursing research, I quickly changed to the PhD program. The program awards students a MSN in Nursing Education once they reach a certain point in the program. I reached that point some time ago. The program is online although the school is brick and mortar and well known.

I landed a position at a local community college where I completed my education practicum. I also work part-time with the local health department creating curriculum and helping to develop a nursing education program. I was told that a second recent graduate of an MSN program applied for the same position with the health department. I inquired why I was selected and she wasn't. I was told because she completed her MSN with an online school. I reminded the medical director that I too was in an online BSN to PhD program. She said, I know that, but I also know of your school.”

I keep copies of the syllabi of the courses I have taken. I think that helps to clear any confusion. I was able to demonstrate the projects I completed in regards to program and curriculum development. I believe having that information helped to secure my position. Perhaps in your portfolio, you could include: a brief description of the school, its' mission and history, list of required courses to completed your degree with course descriptions, and syllabi of each course taken.

This is the topic of my thesis- compared to students who take traditional undergraduate nursing community health courses; is there a difference in scores among students who take online nursing community health courses on the ATI predictor exam? I don't believe people who attend brick and mortar schools receive a better education. If the program is CCNE accredited, it has already demonstrated through its' curriculum that the program meets the rigorous requirements.

The university where you applied, is it a research intensive one? If not, I am surprised by the responses you received. I was told by my professor that I may find it difficult to a land job with schools like Indiana University because of their level of research funding compared to the school I attend. She said all other schools with equal of less funding should be no problem. I knew then that higher education was political.

I wish you the best in your pursuit of finding a nurse educator position.

Edited by ParkerBC,MSN,RN

ParkerBC,MSN,RN, PhD, RN

Specializes in Medical Surgical/Addiction/Mental Health.

Quote from roser13

Version 2.0 wasn't necessary. Version 1.0 completely covered the issue.

Moving on.

No kidding. Nothing like beating it to death. :dead:

And this is why our profession is slow to change. If you can't add anything of value, troll elsewhere.

Edited by ParkerBC,MSN,RN

TheCommuter, BSN, RN

Specializes in Case mgmt., rehab, (CRRN), LTC & psych. Has 15 years experience.

This is the topic of my thesis- compared to traditional undergraduate community health courses; do students who take online community health courses perform equally or better than their counterparts on the ATI predictor exam? I don't believe people who attend brick and mortar schools receive a better education. If the program is CCNE accredited, it has already demonstrated through its' curriculum that the program meets the rigorous requirements.
I can answer about my performance. Last fall I completed an online community health course through the same virtual university that the OP attended. I scored in the 99th percentile on the ATI community health predictor exam.

ParkerBC,MSN,RN, PhD, RN

Specializes in Medical Surgical/Addiction/Mental Health.

I can answer about my performance. Last fall I completed an online community health course through the same virtual university that the OP attended. I scored in the 99th percentile on the ATI community health predictor exam.

I read the quote and realized I messed up on the PICOT question. Anyway Commuter, that does not surprise me!