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So tired of crappy treatment by seasoned nurses!

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by Blackheartednurse Blackheartednurse (Member)

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caroladybelle is a BSN, RN and specializes in Oncology/Haemetology/HIV.

5,486 Posts; 29,413 Profile Views

What former post is this? I've seen it mentioned a couple times today.

Several monthes back, the OP participated in number of discussions, about the dangers and risks posed to attractive nurses in home health, advantages in hiring for the young and attractive, and how jealous old nurses targeted the young and attractive. There is also a focus on backstabbing, cattiness and jealousy.

Given this focus, many involved in those discussions have preconceived impression regarding the OP that will affect how they view her current vent.

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52 Posts; 1,574 Profile Views

Plain speaking does not equal shark. Nurses give their opinions here, and sometimes we don't agree with each other. My rule of thumb is: if I ask for advice I can't be offended when someone posts something I don't agree with. If I decide to wade into the fray, I better have my big girl panties on because sometimes it can get heated here.

I guess what you call "plainly speaking" I call rude and obnoxious. To each it's own. However, I dont think I am alone on this one. I just see a bunch of grown professionals excusing their rude manners. And I do have my big girl pants on, hope you do too, I guess thats how it goes. But it should not be this way.:eek:

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newtress has 3 years experience as a LPN and specializes in med surg ltc psych.

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I've learned in this first year of nursing that no matter where I have been working, the rude manners thing is quite common. Now that I know this, I basically have come to accept this is how it is. I don't like it and feel it's not necessary when mistakes can be made if a seasoned nurse isn't willing to answer a question or two. But I will if in doubt ask that rude nurse to either clarify or verify something in a respectful manner and usually that works out to be pretty decent. I've found that how I approach a very experienced nurse is key to a better outcome. I want that nurse to think or feel that I have some professionalism about me, even though I am nervous and totally unsure about something. I'm asking for verification or a second opinion and I think they may appreciate that.

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klone has 13 years experience as a MSN, RN and specializes in Women's Health/OB Leadership.

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I've only had one nurse that was particularly heinous to me as a new grad. She was snotty and impatient and I felt like I couldn't do anything right. However, as I got to know her over the years I was there, I learned that part of that is just her curt personality, and part of it was MY insecurity being projected onto her behavior towards me.

Turns out, this nurse is one of the ones who taught me the most, and before I left that department to move to a different state, she wrote a glowing recommendation for me for graduate school.

So you just never know. My advice is, if you feel like you're constantly being eaten alive, and all/most of the seasoned nurses are awful, perhaps you should examine what the common denominator is.

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1,118 Posts; 7,789 Profile Views

Well OP, I wasn't there. It's hard to say how someone really treated you when you weren't there. So I'm not going to try and determine if they were rude or not, as many on here have been trying to do.

I'm also not going to judge you based on your past posts, as that's not my place either.

Nursing isn't full of sharks, hopefully you'll find a place where there are more nice ones than meanies. There's only one nasty nurse where I volunteer, the rest of them are nice. One is a tiny number in a huge department.

Stand up for yourself. If you have someone treating you badly, you need to tell them to stop. We're all a team. There's no reason to be rude to each other.

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NanikRN specializes in Oncology, Rehab, Public Health, Med Surg.

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Stand up for yourself. If you have someone treating you badly, you need to tell them to stop. We're all a team. There's no reason to be rude to each other.

But let's be reasonable. OP did not say that she made prior arrangements with the nurse or the company to be precepted. Thus, she just showed up at the end of the clinic(to see closing protocal) and expected the nurse to take extra time to explain proceedures. Prob proceedures that the nurse just learned herself.

Typically these type of clinics are looking for nurses that are comfortable enough to handle unfamilar surrondings. At the very least OP should have prearrange/asked for precepting, not just assumed that nurse at clicnic would give it.

And from what I could see, the nurse didn't talk or treat her badly. She just didn't pander to the op wish that the clinic nurse alter her schedule/tasks to accomadate OP 's need. That is not rude behavior from the clicnic nurse--rather arrogant behavior from the OP.

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Up2nogood RN is a RN and specializes in pulm/cardiology pcu, surgical onc.

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I'm sorry but I don't think that nursing is full of mean sharks. I'm a newer nurse and have oriented in one FT and 2 per diem positions and have always been treated kindly. I think a lot of how one is treated is by one's attitude towards others. It's hard telling from an Internet forum but you seem to always be treated rough no matter where you go. Spmetimes it's best to look within for your answer.

Maybe you're just too good looking and these nurses are jealous?

For what it's worth I'm cute too ;) and don't have any issues with interpersonal work relationships.

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11,191 Posts; 53,636 Profile Views

Given this focus, many involved in those discussions have preconceived impression regarding the OP that will affect how they view her current vent.

i mean, really, how immature is that?

just because someone identifies w/themself as attractive and perceives others as being "jealous", tell me, isn't it remotely possible that could be the case with some???

it really isn't that far-fetched.

and the op has continually taken a boatload of criticism from others, very graciously i would say.

Well OP, I wasn't there. It's hard to say how someone really treated you when you weren't there. So I'm not going to try and determine if they were rude or not, as many on here have been trying to do.

I'm also not going to judge you based on your past posts, as that's not my place either.

Nursing isn't full of sharks, hopefully you'll find a place where there are more nice ones than meanies. There's only one nasty nurse where I volunteer, the rest of them are nice. One is a tiny number in a huge department.

Stand up for yourself. If you have someone treating you badly, you need to tell them to stop. We're all a team. There's no reason to be rude to each other.

happy, the more i read your posts, the more i grow to appreciate you.

you're a very wise woman.

leslie

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1,118 Posts; 7,789 Profile Views

And from what I could see, the nurse didn't talk or treat her badly. She just didn't pander to the op wish that the clinic nurse alter her schedule/tasks to accomadate OP 's need. That is not rude behavior from the clicnic nurse--rather arrogant behavior from the OP.

From what you can see? Were you there? No. You didn't observe the situation so you don't know what truly happened. None of us do.

Which is why the comment I made, which you are referring to, is in general. It was not about that particular nurse or situation.

Is it possible the nurse wasn't rude? Yes. Is it possible the nurse was rude? Yes.

Should the OP have asked for training? Yeah. That's a lesson she's hopefully learned. But I can understand why she may have thought "observe" meant she would be trained. At my hospital, they say you are going to "observe" but it's really not observing. It's training. The person you are observing tells you what they are doing and answers questions. Even when upper management comes to "observe" (and I'm not kidding when they say observe, that's their exact words) they don't observe. They want you to explain everything you are doing. Definitely a poor choice of a word, for sure.

There's a way to give advice, without making comments about the OP being arrogant or whatnot. Plenty of people on here have given great advice.

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219 Posts; 3,021 Profile Views

...I know truth hurts and post from new nurses proves that!!!

Now what does that statement prove, exactly, except that you have a chip on your shoulder and a grudge against "seasoned" nurses?

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410 Posts; 5,530 Profile Views

Should the OP have asked for training? Yeah. That's a lesson she's hopefully learned. But I can understand why she may have thought "observe" meant she would be trained. At my hospital, they say you are going to "observe" but it's really not observing. It's training. The person you are observing tells you what they are doing and answers questions. Even when upper management comes to "observe" (and I'm not kidding when they say observe, that's their exact words) they don't observe. They want you to explain everything you are doing. Definitely a poor choice of a word, for sure.

The position that OP took is at a Mollen flu clinic. They provide online education, and then most employees run the clinic based on that training. Some, based on recommendations from others on the thread here at allnurses, have decided to go observe the clinic set up and tear down procedures. This is NOT paid training. It is NOT done at the suggestion or request of Mollen. The training that is provided is online, and OP was aware of that when she took the position.

The nurse at the clinic may have been rude. She probably didn't understand why OP was there to observe, because it's not part of the standard procedure. It wasn't called for if she was rude. But I just wanted to shed some light on why OP didn't receive "training" from the nurse that she felt was rude -- she wasn't supposed to. OP took the initiative to go on her own, which is excellent. Hopefully her next experience and interaction with this individual will be more positive.

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219 Posts; 3,021 Profile Views

Part of it is that many experienced nurses hear nonexperienced nurses say that they get eaten for "being too cute - being too young - being too nice - being too helpful" etc. When there are actually many more issues at work, that the one venting does not acknowledge.

We also, as experienced nurses, have fortunately or unfortunately, earned not to always take words at face value - most issues are more complex that are presented.

What I've seen also among the new nurses/new hires (because it's not just new nurses who do these things) who complain that they don't get enough instruction and attention from the other nurses on the floors is rebuffing offers of help with constant "No, I don't need any help. I'm fine," negating attempts at education in procedures and unit routine with "I know" or "I already knew that" or "Everybody knows that," affronting staff with declarations of "Don't tell me about THAT kind of stuff. I learned that in nursing school. Tell me about THE OTHER stuff" then confounding the mentor with "I don't know! Everything!" when asked what it is they DO want to be told about...

Most of us create our own problems.

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