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TakeOne

TakeOne

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TakeOne's Latest Activity

  1. TakeOne

    Advice about Co-Worker

    Have you ever worked in a hospital where staff members wagered informally on who will die next, on what day and at what time? Have you ever said or heard someone say that they should write a book about their experiences with patients, or that they should sell tickets to the place because nobody would believe what goes on in hospitals if they didn't see it? None of it is serious. It's a way of blowing off steam. It's not even a "horrible joke." "The girl" has no "major issues" that I can see. We all kid and make jokes (good ones and bad) about patients, residents and each other--if you don't, you really need to lighten up or this work will eat you alive. Are you guys this deathly serious about everything? Try a sense of humor. Incidentally, telephone conversations, even when held in public places, are private inasmuch as only one side of it can be heard. What is heard becomes hearsay, is out of context AND (although said in an occupied break room) nobody elses business.
  2. TakeOne

    Another Vent...About a Frequent Faller!

    The falling resident doesn't need to give you "a straight answer" about what he's doing. "Alert" doesn't mean oriented and rational, and "alert" doesn't mean absence of short-term memory impairment. He likely WAS trying to get to the bathroom (falling and/or combative residents often are), no matter that he's incontinent and in briefs. He likely was trying to reach a book, or get up to look out of a window, or get to a phone, or go see his mother, or any one of the myriad explanations that demented residents give us for their behaviors all day long. Fallers fall because to them there is no reason that they shouldn't get up and motor when they want to. That's how it is, and that's why injury prevention is instituted. There are beds that are even lower than the lowest bed position. There are beds that are only a couple of inches off the floor. They are used in conjunction with floor mats. Residents can't fall out of them because there isn't enough of a rise between the mattress and the mat to allow a fall. Sliding out of these beds is common, but that's not falling and injury from sliding out of bed is uncommon. It sounds as though you are new to long term care. Don't worry. Take these things in stride while learning the nature of LTC residents and expanding your knowledge base about their often frustrating behaviors, as well as the regulations that dictate how LTC is done. Soon it will all start to make sense.
  3. TakeOne

    Advice about Co-Worker

    No it isn't. Nothing has happened, no ones confidentiality has been breached, no information has been disseminated. HIPAA does not apply. Huh? That part lost me. Oh, for heaven's sake! Do you really think that she's going to "follow through with her spy plans"? It was an off-the-cuff, break room phone conversation that the OP eavesdropped on then brought to this forum to get her overall negative opinion of the coworker affirmed. The OP needs to go back to work and mind her own business, up to and including in the break room.
  4. TakeOne

    Another Vent...About a Frequent Faller!

    Ya know... think about that for a minute. If you were confused and disoriented, and found yourself "zipped" into something and utterly unable to get out, how do you think you'd react? I think I'd feel worse than tied down, and respond in kind!
  5. TakeOne

    Ethical Issue -Missing Prescriptions

    I asked you if you were sure, but you responded by saying I'm wrong. What am I wrong about? I read your message correctly. You put a newly-filled bottle of narcotic pain reliever in places you usually don't keep it on two separate occasions. You lost the first one and couldn't account for it in any way. The second one, not only in a place you don't usually keep it BUT ALSO [you added later] in a place where nobody knew you had it, was fine and dandy each time you went to check on it until that Saturday when suddenly all you had was an empty bottle. Please understand that that is not proof that the caregiver took it.
  6. TakeOne

    Advice about Co-Worker

    I disagree. Your post is full of petty and catty remarks about this coworker, and my take is that you are dying to start something. Please, PLEASE don't be one of those nurses.
  7. TakeOne

    DNR POLST not signed by conservator, signed by MD

    It's my experience that court-appointed guardians will sign POLSTs for their wards only if that person's wishes were known ahead of time. Otherwise, since these are third parties assigned when there are no other reliable people available to care for the ward, they cannot take the word of the person who is unable to make decisions for him or herself and have no one else to ask. As they do not and cannot know what the wishes were in the absence of written and witnessed advance directives and have no right to decide for themselves. Yes, I suspect the same. An incident report, huh? Did he think your DON and administrator would take THAT seriously?? :)
  8. TakeOne

    health professional while married

    I had my career before marriage so that's a frame of reference I'm not familiar with. If pressed, however, I would say that marriage, kids, etc. definitely did influence my career choices.
  9. TakeOne

    Plz read!!! Nurse using drugs what should i do???

    Much of what is here is highly judgmental and all of it is one-sided. You only included "items" that you think carry any weight, so what happened to the rest of the story? Moreover, nowhere in your post do you mention that your friend's smoking pot while pregnant might be a problem in and of itself--you acknowledged that she does it, but it's not in your Top 10 List of concerns. Do you not think that it matters?
  10. TakeOne

    Our new hire, new grad charge nurse

    How on earth do my comments, which you lifted out of context and now have standing alone as non sequiturs, illustrate your point in even a sarcastic fashion? I've been practicing for thirty years. Everything I've told you about seeing and doing, I've seen and done. My comments were in defense of the newer/younger/new grad nurses in charge position. Since the point of the original post was that new grads lack the experience to be charge and I was countering that, it's not possible that my comments in context support your contention at all. "New" grad RNs and "new" hire RNs have been oriented to charge and rotated through charge for as long as I've been working. That's how it's been, and that's how it is. In long term care, LPNs are charge unless there's an RN working. That is how it is. Yes, it happens that ineffective nurses might pass off unstable patients as fast as they can without proper report. It isn't just new and inexperienced nurses who do it, and since you have worked for as long as you have, I KNOW you've had that happen to you as well. As for your facility's "policy" concerning what to do when you disagree with the charge nurse, so what? You're responsible for your practice and if you believe that your patient is not getting the care he or she needs it's your responsibility to proceed up the ladder to get it addressed. It's called due diligence, it's a legal standard and you're in deep poo if you ignore it. There was no nuance in the original post, and no nuance in your last one. Resentment drives your post, no matter what your motives are.
  11. TakeOne

    How to Deal With Ignorant Medical Professionals

    Does your employer not have its own Medical Director and physicians to whom you can go for orders when the patient's regular MD is "not available"? Are there established protocols and standing orders for you to follow when certain situations arise? Does your employer have SW and counselors on hand for assistance with the family? Don't risk alienating the family by insulting the doctor. Report what they said to your management, and let them decide whether or not to intervene.
  12. TakeOne

    Our new hire, new grad charge nurse

    She sounds highly resentful. She's not necessarily jealous, but she is very resentful of newly hired new grad RNs in charge positions.
  13. TakeOne

    Our new hire, new grad charge nurse

    Nonsense. That IS how it is and how it's been for as long as I've been practicing. All RNs learned to do charge, and rotated through the position if there was more than one RN on the unit per shift. And what about the rest of us, who don't fit that particular category? What is your estimation of why WE don't agree with you? So, I guess I don't understand your point. Do you want to be charge? The OP sounds resentful of new grads in charge positions, and so do you.
  14. TakeOne

    Our new hire, new grad charge nurse

    You sound like you have a problem with it, no matter how much you deny it. She's the RN. You're LPNs. She's in charge, even though she's a new grad with no experience (how much experience would you expect a new grad to have, anyway--let's be real here). That's how it works.
  15. TakeOne

    Nurse assaulted

    Management doesn't want this kind of thing to get draw the wrong kind of attention to the facility, lest it be perceived as an unsafe work environment. If something like that is identified, management is beholden by labor and occupational safety law to remedy it. They also don't want the injured employee to get any ideas about suing them for allowing an unsafe condition to exist.
  16. TakeOne

    Nurse assaulted

    I doubt that it is "policy." This is probably just advice given to her verbally by her supervisor and management. She certainly had the right to call the police and press charges when a crime was committed against her--in fact, she may still be able to bring charges against the assailant. If the hospital administrators thought something like that might make the facility look bad, they need to learn that preventing fires is easier than putting them out.