Should I give a two weeks' notice?

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I just came asking for advice on a situation.  There was a situation where a patient had to go the the ER and the nurse didn't assess the patient. This and most situations of this magnitude are swept under the rug.  Many shady events have happened over this year, with COVID, and deaths that we've had. No one is held accountable for adverse outcomes. Heck, I don't know how many lawsuits came out of this. 

This is a very toxic environment,  employees argue with  each other even threatening others and being derogatory.  I have been at this job for over a year, I was a new nurse so I took the position. Should I give a two weeks notice or should I quit? I can't see myself working or finishing a two weeks under these conditions. I don't know if I should stick it out. I fear retaliation, even though I didn't do anything wrong to the patient and that they will scrutinize me for the remainder of my notice and with as many patients as we have, it is easy to make a mistake even if it is minor. I am in a position where I can quit, but I don't know if it's a good idea.  What are the consequences? 

Any thoughts?

Davey Do

1 Article; 10,187 Posts

Specializes in Psych (25 years), Medical (15 years). Has 44 years experience.
1 hour ago, neuron said:

I can't see myself working or finishing a two weeks under these conditions. 

 I am in a position where I can quit...

Therein your question lies your answer, neuron.

I have quit jobs in the past, never again to darken the former employer's door, with no long term effects.

TriciaJ, RN

4,295 Posts

Specializes in Psych, Corrections, Med-Surg, Ambulatory. Has 42 years experience.

I surmise you're working in a long term care facility.  The beginning of your post was unclear.

You've been working there over a year but now can't stand the thought of toughing out a two week notice.  I guess when you've had enough you've had enough.

Here's a thought:  put in your notice, then call in sick.  A day later, call them all apologetic about not being able to work your notice.

I don't really see this as being dishonest;  you clearly are sick at the thought of ever going back there.  They may buy it or not.  No matter.  You need to be out of there.

Jedrnurse, BSN, RN

2,776 Posts

Specializes in school nurse. Has 31 years experience.

If you've been there a year, stick it out the two weeks. It'll go by (relatively) quickly and you won't have the black mark of having quit without notice. Even if you don't care what this facility thinks, the nursing world is small and you never know who you'll cross paths with down the road.

JadedCPN, BSN, RN

1,476 Posts

Specializes in Pediatrics, Pediatric Float, PICU, NICU. Has 17 years experience.
1 hour ago, Jedrnurse said:

If you've been there a year, stick it out the two weeks. It'll go by (relatively) quickly and you won't have the black mark of having quit without notice. Even if you don't care what this facility thinks, the nursing world is small and you never know who you'll cross paths with down the road.

I can not agree with this enough. Nursing really is such a small world, I never recommend burning a bridge like that by quitting without notice unless it is absolutely dire. 

JKL33

6,465 Posts

I'd give notice then conduct myself even more carefully than usual. For example, there are things for which they can fault you/write you up that don't involve needing to be hauled in front of the BON. All of administration's needs and fake emergencies, for example.

This is a useful mode even for every day nursing. It is meticulous about things that are actually important nursing principles, and when something needs to be prioritized just de-prioritize everything that isn't directly related to competent/excellent nursing care. Don't rush around passing meds and make a mistake just because you're also supposed to audit 10 charts to make sure your peers charted a pain rating. Pass the meds the right way and if you don't get around to auditing charts then oh well. That kind of thing.

Keep your interactions to a bare minimum and stay far away from squabbles and negativity. Just do your work.

caliotter3

38,333 Posts

Your post sounded as if this is your first nursing job.  Another reason not to quit without notice.  Don't give the employer cause to inform any future prospective employers that you quit your first nursing job without giving proper notice.  If you could tough out one year, you can tough out two weeks.

neuron

553 Posts

Has 5 years experience.
7 hours ago, TriciaJ said:

I surmise you're working in a long term care facility.  The beginning of your post was unclear.

You've been working there over a year but now can't stand the thought of toughing out a two week notice.  I guess when you've had enough you've had enough.

Here's a thought:  put in your notice, then call in sick.  A day later, call them all apologetic about not being able to work your notice.

I don't really see this as being dishonest;  you clearly are sick at the thought of ever going back there.  They may buy it or not.  No matter.  You need to be out of there.

Those are just examples of what has happened but the main situation was recent where the administrator and another manager were being abusive. I feel the situation is uncalled for. 

JadedCPN, BSN, RN

1,476 Posts

Specializes in Pediatrics, Pediatric Float, PICU, NICU. Has 17 years experience.
3 minutes ago, neuron said:

Those are just examples of what has happened but the main situation was recent where the administrator and another manager were being abusive. I feel the situation is uncalled for. 

How exactly were they being abusive? I only ask because if they were being truly abusive, whether it mentally or physically obviously, then yes I probably would quit without notice. But if they were "just" (I don't mean that lightly) being rude/mean/bullies, then I would still try my hardest to stick it out those 2 weeks to not burn the bridge.

Wishinonastar, BSN

3 Articles; 1,000 Posts

Has 38 years experience.

I have always given notice even when it was painful to do. The things they ask a previous employer are how you quit- was it voluntary? How long you worked there? And would they rehire you? Some places will not give much information but we are as someone else said- a small world. There were four local hospitals in my area and all the nurses tended to shift around between them. Everyone after a while knows someone at the place you worked before. Do not start out with a dark quit without notice on your record unless it is so intolerable that you cannot bear it. In a way, once that letter is given to your employer, it feels like a weight is off your shoulders. It is a good feeling. Awkward, but good. You do not care so much - it is short-time mentality and it will help you get through the two weeks. People are less focused on you once you quit too, they have nothing to gain from you anymore. They pull their hooks out. Good luck.

Has 16 years experience.

I have never had anything bad happen by not putting in 2 weeks.  As long as you don't plan on ever working there again.

JBMmom, MSN, NP

4 Articles; 2,350 Posts

Specializes in New Critical care NP, Critical care, Med-surg, LTC. Has 11 years experience.

Especially since it's your first job, I would be hesitant to leave without two weeks notice. You never know when someone you worked for/with in the past will show up in another workplace. I'm sorry to hear that your experience has been so difficult, I do hope that you find a better fit in your next position. Good luck.